A Cultural History of Modern Chinese Literature

Author: Fuhui Wu

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Chinese literature

Page:

View: 445

"Since it focuses on the "development" of modern Chinese literature, it shall be open-ended and ever extending, and nobody has the right to put an end to it. Written as a single-volume literary history, and with illustrations added, the space is quite limited. And since scholars have already expanded the literary history of this period into a much broader one, the author must find some key points that may best represent each period. In this book, he consciously cut down narratives about authors and tried not to cover all their literary works, but give a detailed analysis of typical representative works, in which process the lack and neglect of some major authors and works are unavoidable. Maybe this is a writing method worth trying, and this book may provide both positive and negative experience for future scholars who try to write ever more concise and focused literary histories"--

A History of Modern Chinese Fiction

Author: Chih-tsing Hsia

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 726

View: 309

First published in 1961, and reissued in new editions several times, this is the pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction. The book covers some 60 years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76. C. T. Hsia, Prof. Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia Univ., examines the major writers from Lu Hsun to Eileen Chang and representative works since 1949 from both mainland China and Taiwan. The first serious study of modern Chinese fiction in English, this book is also the best study of its subject available. Not only the specialist, but every reader who is interested in China or in literature will find it of interest. Hsia's astute insights and graceful writing make the book enjoyable as well as deeply edifying.

A History of Contemporary Chinese Literature

Author: Zicheng Hong

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 636

View: 354

"A thorough overview and analysis of the literary scene in China during the 1949-1999 period, focusing primarily on fiction, poetry, drama, and prose writing"--Provided by publisher.

Modern Chinese Literature in the May Fourth Era

Author: Merle Goldman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 360

One of the most creative and brilliant episodes in modern Chinese history, the cultural and literary flowering that takes the name of the May Fourth Movement, is the subject of this comprehensive and insightful book. This is the first study of modern Chinese literature that shows how China's Confucian traditions were combined with Western influences to create a literature of new values and consciousness for the Chinese people.

A New Literary History of Modern China

Author: David Der-wei Wang

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1032

View: 194

Featuring over 140 Chinese and non-Chinese contributors, this landmark volume, edited by David Der-wei Wang, explores unconventional forms as well as traditional genres, emphasizes Chinese authors’ influence on foreign writers as well as China’s receptivity to outside literary influences, and offers vibrant contrasting voices and points of view.

The Birth of Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature

Revolutions in Language, History, and Culture

Author: Yu Gao

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 202

View: 783

This study makes a linguistic case for the twentieth century revolution in Chinese language and literature. It offers a history of reform and change in the Chinese language throughout the country’s history, and focuses on the concept of ‘baihua’, a language reform movement championed by Hu Shi and other scholars which laid the foundation for the May fourth New Literature Movement, the larger New Culture Movement and which now defines modern Chinese. Examining the differences between classical and modern Chinese language systems alongside an investigation into the relevance and impact of translation in this language revolution - notably addressing the pivotal role of May Fourth leader Lu Xun - this book provides a rare insight into the evolution of the Chinese language and those who championed its development.

Modern Chinese Literary and Cultural Studies in the Age of Theory

Reimagining a Field

Author: Rey Chow

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 470

These groundbreaking essays use critical theory to reflect on issues pertaining to modern Chinese literature and culture and, in the process, transform the definition and conceptualization of the field of modern Chinese studies itself. The wide range of topics addressed by this international group of scholars includes twentieth-century literature produced in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and mainland China; film, art, history, popular culture, and literary and cultural criticism; as well as the geographies of migration and diaspora. One of the volume’s provocative suggestions is that the old model of area studies—an offshoot of U.S. Cold War strategy that found its anchorage in higher education—is no longer feasible for the diverse and multifaceted experiences that are articulated under the rubric of “Chineseness.” As Rey Chow argues in her introduction, the notion of a monolithic Chineseness bound ultimately to mainland China is, in itself, highly problematic because it recognizes neither the material realities of ethnic minorities within China nor those of populations in places such as Tibet, Taiwan, and post–British Hong Kong. Above all, this book demonstrates that, as the terms of a chauvinistic sinocentrism become obsolete, the critical use of theory—particularly by younger China scholars whose enthusiasm for critical theory coincides with changes in China’s political economy in recent years—will enable the emergence of fresh connections and insights that may have been at odds with previous interpretive convention. Originally published as a special issue of the journal boundary 2, this collection includes two new essays and an afterword by Paul Bové that places its arguments in the context of contemporary cultural politics. It will have far-reaching implications for the study of modern China and will be of interest to scholars of theory and culture in general. Contributors. Stanley K. Abe, Ien Ang, Chris Berry, Paul Bové, Sung-cheng Yvonne Chang, Rey Chow, Dorothy Ko, Charles Laughlin, Leung Ping-kwan, Kwai-cheung Lo, Christopher Lupke, David Der-wei Wang, Michelle Yeh

Early China

A Social and Cultural History

Author: Li Feng

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 506

'Early China' refers to the period from the beginning of human history in China to the end of the Han Dynasty in AD 220. The roots of modern Chinese society and culture are all to be found in this formative period of Chinese civilization. Li Feng's new critical interpretation draws on the most recent scholarship and archaeological discoveries from the past thirty years. This fluent and engaging overview of early Chinese civilization explores key topics including the origins of the written language, the rise of the state, the Shang and Zhou religions, bureaucracy, law and governance, the evolving nature of war, the creation of empire, the changing image of art, and the philosophical search for social order. Beautifully illustrated with a wide range of new images, this book is essential reading for all those wanting to know more about the foundations of Chinese history and civilization.

Contemporary Chinese Literature

From the Cultural Revolution to the Future

Author: Y. Huang

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 219

View: 848

This book offers a case study of four of the most influential contemporary Chinese writers and 'cultural bastards' - Duoduo, an underground 'misty' poet; Wang Shuo, a 'hooligan' writer; Zhang Chengzhi, an old 'Red Guard' and new 'cultural heretic'; and Wang Xiaobo, a chronicler of Rabelaisian modern history.

A History of Pain

Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film

Author: Michael Berry

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 868

This work probes the restaging, representation, and reimagining of historical violence and atrocity in contemporary Chinese fiction, film, and popular culture. It examines five historical moments including the Musha Incident (1930) and the February 28 Incident (1947).

Belief, History and the Individual in Modern Chinese Literary Culture

Author: Artur K. Wardega

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 190

View: 818

A value system in constant change; a longing for stability amid uncertainties about the future; a new consciousness about the unlimited challenges and aspirations in modern life: these are themes in modern Chinese literature that attract the attention of overseas readers as well as its domestic audience. They also provide Chinese and foreign literary researchers with complex questions about human life and achievements that search beyond national identities for global interaction and exchange. This volume presents ten outstanding essays by Chinese and European scholars who have undertaken such exchange for the purpose of examining the individual and society in modern Chinese literature.

China

A Religious State

Author: Cho-yun Hsu

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 442

An internationally recognized authority on Chinese history and a leading innovator in its telling, Cho-yun Hsu constructs an original portrait of Chinese culture. Unlike most historians, Hsu resists centering his narrative on China's political evolution, focusing instead on the country's cultural sphere and its encounters with successive waves of globalization. Beginning long before China's written history and extending through the twentieth century, Hsu follows the content and expansion of Chinese culture, describing the daily lives of commoners, their spiritual beliefs and practices, the changing character of their social and popular thought, and their advances in material culture and technology. In addition to listing the achievements of emperors, generals, ministers, and sages, Hsu builds detailed accounts of these events and their everyday implications. Dynastic change, the rise and fall of national ambitions, and the growth and decline of institutional systems take on new significance through Hsu's careful research, which captures the multiple strands that gave rise to China's pluralistic society. Paying particular attention to influential relationships occurring outside of Chinese cultural boundaries, he demonstrates the impact of foreign influences on Chinese culture and identity and identifies similarities between China's cultural developments and those of other nations.

Historical Dictionary of Modern Chinese Literature

Author: Li-hua Ying

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 494

View: 361

Historical Dictionary of Modern Chinese Literature presents a broad perspective on the development and history of literature in modern China. This book offers a chronology, introduction, bibliography, and over 300 cross-referenced dictionary entries on authors, literary and historical developments, trends, genres, and concepts that played a central role in the evolution of modern Chinese literature.

A History of Modern Chinese Fiction, 1917-1957

Author: Chih-tsing Hsia

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Chinese fiction

Page: 662

View: 710

"[The author has] tried to elicit and pattern from the chaotic mass of modern Chinese fiction ... and to test this pattern against the communist idea of the modern literary tradition--From preface.

A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature

Author: Yingjin Zhang

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 592

View: 984

This wide-ranging Companion provides a vital overview of modern Chinese literature in different geopolitical areas, from the 1840s to now. It reviews major accomplishments of Chinese literary scholarship published in Chinese and English and brings attention to previously neglected, important areas. Offers the most thorough and concise coverage of modern Chinese literature to date, drawing attention to previously neglected areas such as late Qing, Sinophone, and ethnic minority literature Several chapters explore literature in relation to Sinophone geopolitics, regional culture, urban culture, visual culture, print media, and new media The introduction and two chapters furnish overviews of the institutional development of modern Chinese literature in Chinese and English scholarship since the mid-twentieth century Contributions from leading literary scholars in mainland China and Hong Kong add their voices to international scholarship

The Birth of Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature

Revolutions in Language, History, and Culture

Author: Yu Gao

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 202

View: 888

This study makes a linguistic case for the twentieth century revolution in Chinese language and literature. It offers a history of reform and change in the Chinese language throughout the country’s history, and focuses on the concept of ‘baihua’, a language reform movement championed by Hu Shi and other scholars which laid the foundation for the May fourth New Literature Movement, the larger New Culture Movement and which now defines modern Chinese. Examining the differences between classical and modern Chinese language systems alongside an investigation into the relevance and impact of translation in this language revolution - notably addressing the pivotal role of May Fourth leader Lu Xun - this book provides a rare insight into the evolution of the Chinese language and those who championed its development.

The Appropriation of Cultural Capital

China’s May Fourth Project

Author: Milena Doleželová-Velingerová

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 138

"For much of the twentieth century, the May Fourth movement of 1919 was seen as the foundational moment of modernity in China. Recent examinations of literary and cultural modernity in China have, however, led to a questioning of this view. By approaching May Fourth from novel perspectives, the authors of the eight studies in this volume seek to contribute to the ongoing critique of the movement. The essays are centered on the intellectual and cultural/historical motivations and practices behind May Fourth discourse and highlight issues such as strategies of discourse formation, scholarly methodologies, rhetorical dispositions, the manipulation of historical sources, and the construction of modernity by means of the reification of China’s literary past."

A History of Contemporary Chinese Literature

Author: Zicheng Hong

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 656

View: 533

This groundbreaking book by the eminent Peking University professor Hong Zicheng covers the literary scene in China during the 1949-1999 period, primarily focusing on fiction, poetry, drama, and prose writing.

New Literature in Chinese

China and the World

Author: Zhu Shoutong

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 718

This book systematically discusses the academic connotations of the concept of “Modern Chinese Literature”, as well as its basic categories. The discipline founded upon this concept is influential both in China and throughout the world, and scholars engaged in teaching and research in this field number around ten thousand. The discipline was originally established in haste in an abnormal academic environment, and, with the passage of time, such derivative disciplines as “Contemporary Chinese Literature”, “20th Century Chinese Literature”, “the Literature of Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau” and “World Chinese Literature” have appeared. This book argues that these fields should be united in the area of “New Literature in Chinese”, because they have a shared language, culture and tradition. In today’s multi-polar world, where Chinese literature is so diversified, such an approach is obviously helpful.