A Brief History of Misogyny

The World's Oldest Prejudice

Author: Jack Holland

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 108

In this compelling, powerful book, highly respected writer and commentator Jack Holland sets out to answer a daunting question: how do you explain the oppression and brutalization of half the world's population by the other half, throughout history? The result takes the reader on an eye-opening journey through centuries, continents and civilizations as it looks at both historical and contemporary attitudes to women. Encompassing the Church, witch hunts, sexual theory, Nazism and pro-life campaigners, we arrive at today's developing world, where women are increasingly and disproportionately at risk because of radicalised religious belief, famine, war and disease. Well-informed and researched, highly readable and thought-provoking, this is a refreshingly straightforward investigation into an ancient, pervasive and enduring injustice. It deals with the fundamentals of human existence -- sex, love, violence -- that have shaped the lives of humans throughout history. The answer? It's time to recognize that the treatment of women amounts to nothing less than an abuse of human rights on an unthinkable scale. A Brief History of Misogyny is an important and timely book that will make a long-lasting contribution to the efforts to improve those rights throughout the world.

Misogyny

The New Activism

Author: Gail Ukockis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 934

New aspects of the misogyny that impacts girls and women worldwide continue to emerge every day. However, recent movements (e.g., #MeToo, Time's Up, the Women's March) indicate a strong hunger for a meaningful resource for thoughtful activists. Impassioned but practical, this book discusses the social contexts of misogyny, such as toxic masculinity and rape culture. It traces the history of misogyny and considers its meaning today-what is new and what is old. The author also proposes strategies for effective feminist action. Written for advocates of gender equality who are already aware of misogyny, the book includes Action Steps as tools for activism on both the individual and political levels. Misogyny is a timely text that offers concrete guidance as we strive for the egalitarian society that, despite all setbacks, we are capable of achieving.

Misogyny

The World's Oldest Prejudice

Author: Jack Holland

Publisher: Running PressBook Pub

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 390

An international survey of historical and contemporary attitudes toward women cites the roles played by such factors as radical religion, war, and disease while explaining how witch hunts, Nazism, pro-life campaigns, and other practices have placed half of the world's population disproportionately at risk. Original.

Misogyny Online

A Short (and Brutish) History

Author: Emma A. Jane

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 152

View: 720

Misogyny Online explores the worldwide phenomenon of gendered cyberhate as a significant discourse which has been overlooked and marginalised. The rapid growth of the internet has led to numerous opportunities and benefits; however, the architecture of the cybersphere offers users unprecedented opportunities to engage in hate speech. A leading international researcher in this field, Emma A. Jane weaves together data and theory from multiple disciplines and expresses her findings in a style that is engaging, witty and powerful. Misogyny Online is an important read for students and faculty members alike across the social sciences and humanities.

Misogyny

The Male Malady

Author: David D. Gilmore

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 121

"Yes, women are the greatest evil Zeus has made, and men are bound to them hand and foot with impossible knots by God."—Semonides, seventh century B.C. Men put women on a pedestal to worship them from afar—and to take better aim at them for the purpose of derision. Why is this paradoxical response to women so widespread, so far-reaching, so all-pervasive? Misogyny, David D. Gilmore suggests, is best described as a male malady, as it has always been a characteristic shared by human societies throughout the world. Misogyny: The Male Malady is a comprehensive historical and anthropological survey of woman-hating that casts new light on this age-old bias. The turmoil of masculinity and the ugliness of misogyny have been well documented in different cultures, but Gilmore's synoptic approach identifies misogyny in a variety of human experiences outside of sex and marriage and makes a fresh and enlightening contribution toward understanding this phenomenon. Gilmore maintains that misogyny is so widespread and so pervasive among men that it must be at least partly psychogenic in origin, a result of identical experiences in the male developmental cycle, rather than caused by the environment alone. Presenting a wealth of compelling examples—from the jungles of New Guinea to the boardrooms of corporate America—Gilmore shows that misogynistic practices occur in hauntingly identical forms. He asserts that these deep and abiding male anxieties stem from unresolved conflicts between men's intense need for and dependence upon women and their equally intense fear of that dependence. However, misogyny, according to Gilmore, is also often supported and intensified by certain cultural realities, such as patrilineal social organization; kinship ideologies that favor fraternal solidarity over conjugal unity; chronic warfare, feuding, or other forms of intergroup violence; and religious orthodoxy or asceticism. Gilmore is in the end able to offer steps toward the discovery of antidotes to this irrational but global prejudice, providing an opportunity for a lasting cure to misogyny and its manifestations.

Picturing Women in Late Medieval and Renaissance Art

Author: Christa Grössinger

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 173

View: 269

This extensively illustrated book discusses the representation of women in the art of the late Middle Ages in Northern Europe. Drawing on a wide range of different media, but making particular use of the rich plethora of woodcuts, the author charts how the images of women hanged during the period and proposes two basic categories - the Virgin and Eve, good and evil. Within these, however, we discover attitudes to sinful, foolish, married and unmarried women and the style and use of these images exposes the full extend of the misogyny entrenched in medieval society.

A Brief History of The Men’s Rights Movement

From 1856 to the present

Author: Peter Wright

Publisher: Academic Century Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 223

View: 171

The Men’s Rights Movement consists of groups or individuals fighting for improved human rights for men. The movement is sometimes referred to as the Men’s Human Rights Movement (MHRM), with human rights serving as a central focus that encompasses the same rights called civil liberties or civil rights but also including those rights that are not encoded in law - such as compassionate and respectful behavior toward men and indeed toward all human beings. The purpose of the movement has occasionally been misunderstood, this partly because it has been poorly documented. To correct that oversight this book attempts to provide a brief overview of both the historical beginnings and goals of the movement over the last 150 years. A historical survey reveals that the MRM is concerned with a large array of issues impacting men and boys such as alimony, genital mutilation of male infants, male homelessness, mental illness, false accusations, family court bias, suicide, child custody, low funding for male health issues, educational performance, and misandry in mainstream culture just to name a few. The following pages provide examples of the early MRM in action, focusing in Parts 1 – 3 on the rise of men’s advocacy in the 1800s. Part four provides a sample list of men’s rights initiatives from the 1800s to recent times, and Part five provides a few personal and co-authored essays penned between the years 2012 – 2017 that give a taste of contemporary thinking, with the concluding essay by Robert Brockway giving a general overview of concerns of the modern MRM. With the publication of this material in one volume it is hoped that the historical footprint of the MRM will be set straight.

Misogyny, Misandry, and Misanthropy

Author: R. Howard Bloch

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 258

View: 499

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1989.

The Troublesome Helpmate

A History of Misogyny in Literature

Author: Katharine M. Rogers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Misogyny in literature

Page: 288

View: 710

A Brief History of Tea

The Extraordinary Story of the World's Favourite Drink

Author: Roy Moxham

Publisher: Constable

ISBN:

Category: Tea

Page: 258

View: 787

Behind the wholesome image of the world's most popular drink lies a strangely murky and often violent past. When tea began to be imported into the West from China in the seventeenth century, its high price and heavy taxes made it an immediate target for smuggling and dispute at every level, culminating in international incidents like the notorious Boston Tea Party. In China itself the British financed their tea dealings by the ruthless imposition of the opium trade. Intrepid British tea planters soon began flocking to India, Ceylon and Africa, setting up huge plantations; often workers were bought and sold like slaves. Roy Moxham's account of this extraordinary history begins with his own sojourn in Africa, managing 500 acres of tea and a thousand-strong workforce. His experiences inform the book and led him to investigate the early history of tea - and the results of his researches reflect little credit on the British Empire, while often revealing a fascinating world story.

A Brief History of the Normans

Author: Francois Neveux

Publisher: Running PressBook Pub

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 440

Examines the rise of this powerful warrior tribe of the Dark Ages that dominated vast lands of Europe from the Baltic Sea to Sicily, established their own kingdom, and eventually came to rule the British Isles in 1066 A.D. Original.

A Brief History of the End of the World

Author: Simon Pearson

Publisher: Constable

ISBN:

Category: Armageddon

Page: 310

View: 358

Most people's concept of the 'end of the world' comes from the book of Revelation. Today, there are an estimated 25 million Christian fundamentalists in the US who believe it will come with the 'Rapture;' others point to an ecological catastrophe, the AIDS pandemic, nuclear and biological warfare. With the benefit of a vast historical canvas, Pearson examines both apocalyptic theory (biblical literature, art, and popular culture) and practice (politics, cults, war, and revolution), from its Biblical beginnings to the Branch Davidians, via the Vikings, the French Revolution, the Pilgrim Fathers, Hitler's Apocalyptic rhetoric, asteroids, Hollywood and suicide bombers. Pearson's illuminating study shows how our pictures of the end of the world have evoked and converged--and are still very much on the agenda.

A Brief History of the Age of Steam

The Power that Drove the Industrial Revolution

Author: Thomas Crump

Publisher: Constable

ISBN:

Category: Steam engineering

Page: 370

View: 515

In 1710 an obscure Devon ironmonger Thomas Newcomen invented a machine with a pump driven by coal, used to extract water from mines. Over the next two hundred years the steam engine would be at the heart of the industrial revolution that changed the fortunes of nations. Passionately written and insightful, A Brief History of the Age of Steam reveals not just the lives of the great inventors such as Watts, Stephenson and Brunel but also tells a narrative that reaches from the US to the expansion of China, India and South America and shows how the steam engine changed the world.

A Brief History of the English Civil Wars

Roundheads, Cavaliers and the Execution of the King

Author: John Miller

Publisher: Constable

ISBN:

Category: Battles

Page: 230

View: 300

'The English Civil War' is one of the most hotly contested areas of English History. Amid dramatic accounts of the key battles and confrontations, the author explores what triggered the initial conflict between crown and parliament and how this was played out in England, Scotland and Ireland in the lead-up to war.

Medieval Misogyny and the Invention of Western Romantic Love

Author: R. Howard Bloch

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

View: 105

Until now the advent of Western romantic love has been seen as a liberation from—or antidote to—ten centuries of misogyny. In this major contribution to gender studies, R. Howard Bloch demonstrates how similar the ubiquitous antifeminism of medieval times and the romantic idealization of woman actually are. Through analyses of a broad range of patristic and medieval texts, Bloch explores the Christian construction of gender in which the flesh is feminized, the feminine is aestheticized, and aesthetics are condemned in theological terms. Tracing the underlying theme of virginity from the Church Fathers to the courtly poets, Bloch establishes the continuity between early Christian antifeminism and the idealization of woman that emerged in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. In conclusion he explains the likely social, economic, and legal causes for the seeming inversion of the terms of misogyny into those of an idealizing tradition of love that exists alongside its earlier avatar until the current era. This startling study will be of great value to students of medieval literature as well as to historians of culture and gender.

Down Girl

The Logic of Misogyny

Author: Kate Manne

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 368

View: 676

Down Girl is a broad, original, and far ranging analysis of what misogyny really is, how it works, its purpose, and how to fight it. The philosopher Kate Manne argues that modern society's failure to recognize women's full humanity and autonomy is not actually the problem. She argues instead that it is women's manifestations of human capacities -- autonomy, agency, political engagement -- is what engenders misogynist hostility.

Daughters of the Church

Women and ministry from New Testament times to the present

Author: Ruth A. Tucker

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 556

View: 510

Rich in historical events and colorfully written, this fascinating account of women in the church spans nearly two thousand years of church history. It tells of events and aspirations, determination and disappointment, patience and achievement that mark the history of daughters of the church from the time of Jesus to the present. The authors have endeavored to present an objective story. The very fact that readers may find themselves surprised now and again by the prominent role of women in certain events and movements proves an inequality that historical narrative has often been guilty of. This is a book about women. It is a setting straight off the record -- a restoring of balance to history that has repeatedly played down the significance of the contributions of women to the theology, the witness, the movements, and the growth of the church. An exegetical study of relevant Scripture passages offers stimulating thought for discussion and for serious reevaluation of historical givens. This volume is enriched by pictures, appendixes, bibliography, and indexes. Like many of the women whose stories it tells, this book has a subdued strength that should not be underestimated.

The Literature of Misogyny in Medieval Spain

The Arcipreste de Talavera and the Spill

Author: Michael Solomon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 609

An examination of two fifteenth-century misogynist Iberian works.

Misogynous Economies

The Business of Literature in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Author: Laura C. Mandell

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 417

The eighteenth century saw the birth of the concept of literature as business: literature critiqued and promoted capitalism, and books themselves became highly marketable canonical objects. During this period, misogynous representations of women often served to advance capitalist desires and to redirect feelings of antagonism toward the emerging capitalist order. Misogynous Economies proposes that oppression of women may not have been the primary goal of these misogynistic depictions. Using psychoanalytic concepts developed by Julia Kristeva, Mandell argues that passionate feelings about the alienating socioeconomic changes brought on by capitalism were displaced onto representations that inspired hatred of women and disgust with the female body. Such displacements also played a role in canon formation. The accepted literary canon resulted not simply from choices made by eighteenth-century critics but also, as Mandell argues, from editorial and production practices designed to stimulate readers' desires to identify with male poets. Mandell considers a range of authors, from Dryden and Pope to Anna Letitia Barbauld, throughout the eighteenth century. She also reconsiders Augustan satire, offering a radically new view that its misogyny is an attempt to resist the commodification of literature. Mandell shows how misogyny was put to use in public discourse by a culture confronting modernization and resisting alienation.