A Brief History of Henry VIII

King, Reformer and Tyrant

Author: Derek Wilson

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 488

Henry VIII changed the course of English life more completely than any monarch since the Conquest. In the portraits of Holbein, Henry Tudor stands proud as one of the most powerful figures in renaissance Europe. But is the portrait just a bluff? In his new book Derek Wilson explores the myths behind the image of the Tudor Lion. He was the monarch that delivered the Reformation to England yet Luther called him 'A fool, a liar and a damnable rotten worm'. As a young man he gained a reputation as an intellectual and fair prince yet he ruled the nation like a tyrant. He treated his subjects as cruelly as he treated his wives. Based on a wealth of new material and a life time's knowledge of the subject Derek Wilson exposes a new portrait of a much misunderstood King. PRAISE FOR DEREK WILSON'S PREVIOUS WORKS: The Uncrowned Kings of England: 'Stimulating and authorative.' John Guy 'Masterly. [Wilson] has a deep understanding of...characters, reaching out accross the centuries.' Sunday Times Hans Holbein: Portrait of an Unknown Man: 'Fascinating.' Sarah Bradford, Daily Telegraph' Highly readable...The most accurate and vivid portrayal to date.' Alison Weir

Tudors

The History of England

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 99

Following on from Foundation, Tudors is the second volume in Peter Ackroyd's astonishing series, The History of England. Rich in detail and atmosphere and told in vivid prose, Tudors recounts the transformation of England from a settled Catholic country to a Protestant superpower. It is the story of Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome, and his relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir; of how the brief reign of the teenage king, Edward VI, gave way to the violent reimposition of Catholicism and the stench of bonfires under 'Bloody Mary'. It tells, too, of the long reign of Elizabeth I, which, though marked by civil strife, plots against the queen and even an invasion force, finally brought stability. Above all, however, it is the story of the English Reformation and the making of the Anglican Church. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, England was still largely feudal and looked to Rome for direction; at its end, it was a country where good governance was the duty of the state, not the church, and where men and women began to look to themselves for answers rather than to those who ruled them.

My Revision Notes Edexcel AS History: Henry VIII - Authority, Nation and Religion, 1509-40

Author: Peter Clements

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 80

View: 188

Written by senior examiners and experienced teachers of the course, this student revision workbook for Edexcel AS History Unit 2: Henry VIII: Authority, Nation and Religion, 1509-40 closely combines course content with revision activities and advice on exam technique. This allows students the opportunity to improve the skills needed to perform well in exam conditions through interacting with the content they need to revise. In addition each section has a model answer with exam tips for students to analyse and better understand what is required in the exam.

A Brief History of the Episcopal Church

Author: David L. Holmes

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 239

View: 431

A readable and accurate account of the beginnings of the Anglican Church in America at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, to the establishment of the Protestant Church in America after the War of Independence to the present day. All who are insterested in Americn church history and in the influence of the Espicopal Church on American history will find Holmes' book most enlightening.

Henry VIII

Author: J. J. Scarisbrick

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 561

View: 898

A realistic portrait of the sixteenth century English king and of the personalities who dominated his times.

The Children of Henry VIII

Author: Alison Weir

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 276

“Fascinating . . . Alison Weir does full justice to the subject.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer At his death in 1547, King Henry VIII left four heirs to the English throne: his only son, the nine-year-old Prince Edward; the Lady Mary, the adult daughter of his first wife Katherine of Aragon; the Lady Elizabeth, the teenage daughter of his second wife Anne Boleyn; and his young great-niece, the Lady Jane Grey. In this riveting account Alison Weir paints a unique portrait of these extraordinary rulers, examining their intricate relationships to each other and to history. She traces the tumult that followed Henry's death, from the brief intrigue-filled reigns of the boy king Edward VI and the fragile Lady Jane Grey, to the savagery of "Bloody Mary," and finally the accession of the politically adroit Elizabeth I. As always, Weir offers a fresh perspective on a period that has spawned many of the most enduring myths in English history, combining the best of the historian's and the biographer's art. “Like anthropology, history and biography can demonstrate unfamiliar ways of feeling and being. Alison Weir's sympathetic collective biography, The Children of Henry VIII does just that, reminding us that human nature has changed--and for the better. . . . Weir imparts movement and coherence while re-creating the suspense her characters endured and the suffering they inflicted.”—The New York Times Book Review

The Six Wives of Henry VIII

Author: D. M. Loades

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 265

The marital ups and downs of England's most infamous king. The story of Henry VIII and his six wives has passed from history into legend - taught in the cradle as a cautionary tale and remembered in adulthood as an object lesson in the dangers of marrying into royalty. The true story behind the legend, however, remains obscure to most people, whose knowledge of the affair begins and ends with the aide memoire 'Divorced, executed, died, divorce, executed, survived'. David Loades masterly book recounts the whole sorry tale in detail from Henry's first marriage, to his brother's widow, to more or less contented old age in the care of the motherly Catherine Parr.

A Brief History of Britain 1485-1660

The Tudor and Stuart Dynasties

Author: Ronald Hutton

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 958

From the death of Richard III on Bosworth Field in 1485 to the execution of Charles I, after the Civil Wars of 1642-48, England was transformed by two Dynasties. Firstly the Tudors, who won the crown on the battlefield and changed both the nature of kingship but also the nation itself. England became a Protestant nation and began to establishment itself as a trading power; facing down impossible odds it defeated its enemies on land and sea. Yet after a century Elizabeth I died with no heir and the crown was passed to the Stuarts, who were keen to remould the kingdom in their own image. Leading Historian, Ronald Hutton brilliantly recreates the political landscape over this early modern period and shows how the modern nation was forged in these anxious, transformative years. Combining skilful pen portraits of the leading figures, culture, economics and accounts of everyday life, he reveals insights in this key era in our nation's story. This the second book in the four volume Brief History of Britain which brings together some of the leading historians to tell our nation's story from the Norman Conquest of 1066 to the present-day. Combining the latest research with accessible and entertaining story telling, it is the ideal introduction for students and general readers.

A Brief History of Ireland

Author: Richard Killeen

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 252

From the dawn of history to the decline of the Celtic Tiger - how Ireland has been shaped over the centuries. Ireland has been shaped by many things over the centuries: geography, war, the fight for liberty. A Brief History of Ireland is the perfect introduction to this exceptional place, its people and its culture. Ireland has been home to successive groups of settlers - Celts, Vikings, Normans, Anglo-Scots, Huguenots. It has imported huge ideas, none bigger than Christianity which it then re-exported to Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire. In the Tudor era it became the first colony of the developing English Empire. Its fraught and sometimes brutal relationship with England has dominated its modern history. Killeen argues that religion was decisive in all this: Ireland remained substantially Catholic, setting it at odds with the larger island culturally, religiously and politically. But its own culture and identity have stayed strong, most obviously in literature with a magnificent tradition of writing from the Book of Kells to the modern masters: Joyce, Yeats, Beckett and Heaney.