A Bigger Prize

How We Can Do Better than the Competition

Author: Margaret Heffernan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 416

View: 585

Get into the best schools. Land your next big promotion. Dress for success. Run faster. Play tougher. Work harder. Keep score. And whatever you do—make sure you win. Competition runs through every aspect of our lives today. From the cubicle to the race track, in business and love, religion and science, what matters now is to be the biggest, fastest, meanest, toughest, richest. The upshot of all these contests? As Margaret Heffernan shows in this eye-opening book, competition regularly backfires, producing an explosion of cheating, corruption, inequality, and risk. The demolition derby of modern life has damaged our ability to work together. But it doesn't have to be this way. CEOs, scientists, engineers, investors, and inventors around the world are pioneering better ways to create great products, build enduring businesses, and grow relationships. Their secret? Generosity. Trust. Time. Theater. From the cranberry bogs of Massachusetts to the classrooms of Singapore and Finland, from tiny start-ups to global engineering firms and beloved American organizations—like Ocean Spray, Eileen Fisher, Gore, and Boston Scientific—Heffernan discovers ways of living and working that foster creativity, spark innovation, reinforce our social fabric, and feel so much better than winning.

A Bigger Prize

Author: Denis Gray

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 452

View: 220

When trainer Frank “Black Machine” Whaley of View Point, Texas, dies of a heart attack in 1946, Elegant Raines, an eighteen-year-old black prizefighter, must find a new trainer. Raines calls on Leemore “Pee-Pot” Manners, a boxing trainer who lives in Longwood, West Virginia. Any honest man would say Pee-Pot knows more about boxing than anyone alive—whether that man is black or white. Raines’s goal is to become the heavyweight champion of the world. Under Pee-Pot’s tutelage Raines wins not only the middleweight championship, but the light heavyweight championship, marking him as one of the greatest fighters of his time. During his quest for the title, Raines falls in love with Gem Loving, a pastor’s daughter whose father, Pastor Embry O. Loving, maintains a dim view of fighters. Gem must fight for Raines in ways her father will condemn. A Bigger Prize tells a fictional story of the boxing world in the 1940s and what the sport meant to both blacks and whites of the time. It considers the question of whether Elegant Raines’s “bigger prize” is the world’s heavyweight championship—or something outside the ring more violent than boxing and its reward.

The Caddie Was a Reindeer

And Other Tales of Extreme Recreation

Author: Steve Rushin

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 272

View: 196

Steve Rushin, a four-time finalist for the National Magazine Award, has been hailed as one of the best sportswriters in America. In The Caddie Was a Reindeer he circumnavigates the globe in pursuit of extreme recreation. In the Arctic Circle, he meets ice golfers. In Minnesota, he watches the National Amputee Golf Tournament, where one participant tells him, “I literally have one foot in the grave.” Along the way, Rushin meets fellow travelers like Joe Cahn, a professional tailgater who confesses aboard the RV in which he lives: “It’s wonderful to see America from your bathroom.” And even Rushin has logged fewer miles in pursuit of extreme recreation than Rich Rodriguez, a marathon roller-coaster rider who makes endless loops for entire summers on coasters around the world. The Caddie Was a Reindeer is a ride to everywhere: to south London (where Rushin downs pints with the King of Darts), to the Champs-Elysees (where the author indulges in “excessive nightclubbing” with World Cup soccer stars), and to Japan (where Rushin eats soba noodles with the world champion of competitive eating). Enlightening, hilarious, and unexpectedly heartwarming, this collection is not a body of work: it’s a body of play.

The Blizzard - The Football Quarterly: Issue Twelve

Author: Jonathan Wilson

Publisher: Blizzard Media Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 190

View: 441

The Blizzard is a quarterly football publication, put together by a cooperative of journalists and authors, its main aim to provide a platform for top-class writers from across the globe to enjoy the space and the freedom to write what they like about the football stories that matter to them. Contents of Issue Twelve ---------------- The Rivals ---------------- * Sid Lowe, Power Play - Carles Rexach and Jorge Valdano discuss the changing nature of the Real Madrid-Barcelona rivalry * Miguel Delaney, Gamechanger - Johan Cruyff on his role in creating the style of Barcelona and modern football * Graham Hunter, An Honourable Man - How Vicente del Bosque overcame rejection by Real Madrid to lead Spain to glory --------------------------- A Game of Chess --------------------------- * Philippe Auclair, Beyond the System - Could the lessons of chess show football the way to an exciting new future? * Scott Oliver, Play Jazz, not Chess - Reflections on football, order and the imagination, and the need for improvisation ------------ Theory ------------ * Steve Menary, Maximum Opportunity - Was Charles Hughes a long-ball zealot, or pragmatist reacting to necessity? * Sergio Levinsky, The Cult of the Pibe - Argentina’s love affair with scruffy urchins with feet of gold --------------------------------- Defenders of the Faith --------------------------------- * Paul Brown, The Birth of the Fan - Why Victorians flocked to watch 22 men kicking a pig’s bladder about * James Montague, Jerusalem Syndrome - The mysterious disappearance of Guma Aguiar, the saviour of Beitar Jerusalem * Brian Homewood, Identity Crisis - Unpicking the convoluted threads of Mexico’s franchise system * Bartosz Nowicki, Dream Fulfilled - Relief and glee as Cardiff City finally found their way into the Premier League -------------------------- Against the Odds -------------------------- * Robin Bairner, Sleeping Giant - In 1982, Jean-Pierre Adams was given anaesthetic before knee surgery. He hasn’t woken up. * Richard Jolly, And Not to Yield - Only one sportsman can match Ryan Giggs for longevity: the New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter * Javier Sauras and Felix Lill, The Street Dogs of Manila - The Philippines are rising through the rankings, but are they Filipino enough * Matthew Campelli, Second City Syndrome - Why has Birmingham struggled for football success for 30 years? --------------- Polemics --------------- * Alex Keble, Artist or Machine? - An investigation into the paradoxical relationship between sport and creativity * Tim Vickery, Alternate Title - The lessons sports journalists can draw from the Monkees --------------- Fiction --------------- * Iain Macintosh, The Quantum of Bobby - After his exile in Qatar, Bobby Manager returns to English football. Or does he…? ------------------------- Greatest Games ------------------------- * Rob Smyth, England 1 West Germany 1* - World Cup semi-final, 4 July 1990, Stadio delle Alpi, Turin ----------------- Eight Bells ----------------- * Michael Yokhin, Non-identical twins - A selection of twins who looked the same but played very differently

News in a New Century

Reporting in An Age of Converging Media

Author: Jerry Lanson

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 339

View: 212

This comprehensive book provides a wealth of exercises and assignments for teaching students reporting skills, combining successful, tried and tested techniques with an awareness of new realities and technologies in broadcast and print. The authors take the student through a writing process initiated by ideas rather than concepts of correct writing, covering: writing in different media, including the Internet; news beats; sensitivity and the diverse national community; law and ethics; and new research skills, including databases and computer-assisted reporting.

Half a World Away: a Love Least Expected

Inspired by True Events

Author: Lee E. Carter

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 817

"Half A World Away", inspired by true events, is an International Suspense-Mystery-Romance of a man whose entire adult life becomes plagued by a series of unfortunate events, before his world begins to slowly become brighter. At one time, Jared Marchal was at the top of his game. He had the promising military and police careers he always wanted, was very well off financially, enjoyed a great marriage and later, welcomed a son on the way. Beginning with a tragedy no one should endure, Jareds perfect world progressively continues to crash around him. Jared becomes a writer by chance, and through an act of serendipity by his publisher, he is contacted by a fellow writer, Stasia, from Russia; an unlikely heroine who attempts to tear down the massive wall protecting his heart from any possibility of disappointment, as well as any happiness. Soon their love, a passion so newly developed, will be the only simple, uncomplicated aspect of their lives together. As the intrigue begins, a volatile secret surrounding Stasia and its potential to change the world, OPEC, and war as we now know it, in addition to her fathers own military past, catapults them into an international event involving both their countries. Governments, double agents, betrayal and murder all intrude among the many twists you never see coming, as they collide forward into the storys climax. The spirit of their personalities also shines as the jokes they play on one another during their times together are a welcome relief, as well as some of the funniest situations ever written. Author, Lee E. Carter, through skillful adaptation of people from personal, military and law enforcement experiences, intertwines fiction and non-fiction to create the distinctive personalities and action sequences of "Half A World Away ".

Of Beasts and Beings

Author: Ian Holding

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 135

Militia seize an innocent captive and subject him to a nightmarish overland journey that feels as though it will never end. Meanwhile, a lonely white schoolteacher wrestles personal demons whilst attempting to overcome the everyday difficulties of a life in which power cuts last for months at a time, homes are left without running water, brawls break out over even the most basic necessities and an atmosphere of fear and intimidation presides. Which of them is in the gravest danger, and does either have the power to escape their fate? In this highly original, searing and timely new novel, we witness the devastating effects of a country's economic and moral collapse. In a world where greed, barbarism, anarchy and lawlessness are rife, how do the honest survive? Is it possible to keep a conscience when all those around you have lost theirs?

A Dog's Life

An FBC Mystery

Author: Edward Garbowski, Jr.

Publisher: Edward Garbowski Jr

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 316

Having recently lost both parents to a brutal murder, Franklin Benjamin Cartwright has decided that it's time to retire from life in the big city and try a quiet life in the country. While still young, he has inherited his family's wealth and wants to leave the "rat race" behind. He decides to first try a small town called Witmore that claims to have a population under 1,000.The place turns out to have some odd characters, but plenty of quiet charm that he is looking for. It also has a romantic interest in the form of local reporter Janice Fredricks. And most important, Franklin also comes across a wayward dog that has more to him than meets the eye initially.What it also has is what Franklin wanted to avoid: murder! When the newly installed hotel manager turns up murdered, Franklin's curious nature kicks in and he feels he can't walk away without trying to solving it. What happens along the way surprises him and the whole town.

Movies and the Meaning of Life

Philosophers Take on Hollywood

Author: Kimberly A. Blessing

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 300

View: 336

"The meaning of life is the most urgent of questions," said the existentiallist thinker Albert Camus. And no less a philosopher than Woody Allen has wondered:"How is it possible to find meaning in a finite world, given my waist and shirt size?" "Movies and the Meaning of Life" looks at popular and cult movies, examining their assumptions and insights on meaning-of-life questions: What is reality and how can I know it? (The Truman Show, Contact, Waking Life); How do I find myself and my true identity? (Fight Club, Being John Malkovich, Boys Don't Cry, Memento); How do I find meaning from my interactions with others? (Pulp Fiction, Shadowlands, Chasing Amy); What is the chief purpose in life? (American Beauty, Life is Beautiful, The Shawshank Redemption); and How ought I live my life? (Pleasantville, Spiderman, Minority Report, Groundhog Day).

The Thistle and the Drone

How America's War on Terror Became a Global War on Tribal Islam

Author: Akbar Ahmed

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 106

In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, the United States declared war on terrorism. More than ten years later, the results are decidedly mixed. Here world-renowned author, diplomat, and scholar Akbar Ahmed reveals an important yet largely ignored result of this war: in many nations it has exacerbated the already broken relationship between central governments and the largely rural Muslim tribal societies on the peripheries of both Muslim and non-Muslim nations. The center and the periphery are engaged in a mutually destructive civil war across the globe, a conflict that has been intensified by the war on terror. Conflicts between governments and tribal societies predate the war on terror in many regions, from South Asia to the Middle East to North Africa, pitting those in the centers of power against those who live in the outlying provinces. Akbar Ahmed's unique study demonstrates that this conflict between the center and the periphery has entered a new and dangerous stage with U.S. involvement after 9/11 and the deployment of drones, in the hunt for al Qaeda, threatening the very existence of many tribal societies. American firepower and its vast anti-terror network have turned the war on terror into a global war on tribal Islam. And too often the victims are innocent children at school, women in their homes, workers simply trying to earn a living, and worshipers in their mosques. Battered by military attacks or drone strikes one day and suicide bombers the next, the tribes bemoan, "Every day is like 9/11 for us." In The Thistle and the Drone, the third volume in Ahmed's groundbreaking trilogy examining relations between America and the Muslim world, the author draws on forty case studies representing the global span of Islam to demonstrate how the U.S. has become involved directly or indirectly in each of these societies. The study provides the social and historical context necessary to understand how both central governments and tribal societies have become embroiled in America's war. Beginning with Waziristan and expanding to societies in Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, and elsewhere, Ahmed offers a fresh approach to the conflicts studied and presents an unprecedented paradigm for understanding and winning the war on terror. The Thistle and the Drone was the 2013 Foreword Reviews Gold winner for Political Science.