Writing on the Wall

Social Media - The First 2,000 Years

Author: Tom Standage

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 162040284X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9565

From the bestselling author of A History of the World in 6 Glasses, the story of social media from ancient Rome to the Arab Spring and beyond. Social media is anything but a new phenomenon. From the papyrus letters that Cicero and other Roman statesmen used to exchange news, to the hand-printed tracts of the Reformation and the pamphlets that spread propaganda during the American and French revolutions, the ways people shared information with their peers in the past are echoed in the present. After decades of newspapers, radio, and television dominating in dissemination of information, the Internet has spawned a reemergence of social media as a powerful new way for individuals to share information with their friends, driving public discourse in new ways. Standage reminds us how historical social networks have much in common with modern social media. The Catholic Church's dilemmas in responding to Martin Luther's attacks are similar to those of today's large institutions in responding to criticism on the Internet, for example, and seventeenth-century complaints about the distractions of coffeehouses mirror modern concerns about social media. Invoking figures from Thomas Paine to Vinton Cerf, co-inventor of the Internet, Standage explores themes that have long been debated, from the tension between freedom of expression and censorship to social media's role in spurring innovation and fomenting revolution. Writing on the Wall draws on history to cast provocative new light on today's social media and encourages debate and discussion about how we'll communicate in the future.

Writing on the Wall

Social Media - The First 2,000 Years

Author: Tom Standage

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408842076

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 3251

Today we are endlessly connected: constantly tweeting, texting or e-mailing. This may seem unprecedented, yet it is not. Throughout history, information has been spread through social networks, with far-reaching social and political effects. Writing on the Wall reveals how an elaborate network of letter exchanges forewarned of power shifts in Cicero's Rome, while the torrent of tracts circulating in sixteenth-century Germany triggered the Reformation. Standage traces the story of the rise, fall and rebirth of social media over the past 2,000 years offering an illuminating perspective on the history of media, and revealing that social networks do not merely connect us today ? they also link us to the past.

Revolutions in Communication

Media History from Gutenberg to the Digital Age

Author: Bill Kovarik

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 144118550X

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 7213

The rise of the Information Age, the fall of the traditional media, and the bewildering explosion of personal information services are all connected to the historical chain of communications' revolutions. We need to understand these revolutions because they influence our present and future as much as any other trend in history. And we need to understand them not simply on a national basis - an unstable foundation for history in any event - but rather as part of the emergent global communications network. Unlike most of the current texts in the field, Revolutions in Communication is an up-to-date resource, expanding upon contemporary scholarship. It provides students and teachers with detailed sidebars about key figures, technical innovations, global trends, and social movements, as well as supplemental reading materials, and a fully supportive companion website. Revolutions in Communication is an authoritative introduction to the history of all branches of media.

Go Figure

Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know

Author: The Economist

Publisher: The Economist

ISBN: 1610397444

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 256

View: 3474

Go Figure: Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know brings together for the first time the very best explainers and charts, written and created by top journalists to help us understand such brain-bending conundrums as why almost half the population of Korea has one of two surnames, how bitcoin mining works, and the seasonal distribution of dog poo on the streets of New York. Subjects both topical and timeless, profound and peculiar, are explained with The Economist's trademark wit and verve. The Economist Explains and its online sister, the Daily Chart, are the two most popular blogs on The Economist's website. Together, these online giants provide answers to the kinds of questions, quirky and serious, that may be puzzling anyone interested in the world around them. Want to know how a tattoo affects your job prospects, why bees are under threat, or even how different countries spend their money? We have the answers. They are sometimes surprising, often intriguing, and always enlightening.

The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories

Author: Frank Rose

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393341259

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 2553

A contributing editor at Wired examines the way entertainment has shifted in the face of new media and discusses the way that people such as Will Wright, James Cameron and Damon Lindelof are changing how we play, relax and think. Reprint.

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone on the Media

Author: Brooke Gladstone,Josh Neufeld

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393077799

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 1444

The cohost of NPR's On the Media narrates, in cartoon form, two millennia of the influence of the media on the populace, from newspapers in Caesar's Rome to the penny press of the American Revolution to today. 30,000 first printing.

A History of the World in Six Glasses

Author: Tom Standage

Publisher: Anchor Canada

ISBN: 0307375110

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9022

Whatever your favourite tipple, when you pour yourself a drink, you have the past in a glass. You can likely find them all in your own kitchen — beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, cola. Line them up on the counter, and there you have it: thousands of years of human history in six drinks. Tom Standage opens a window onto the past in this tour of six beverages that remain essentials today. En route he makes fascinating forays into the byways of western culture: Why were ancient Egyptians buried with beer? Why was wine considered a “classier” drink than beer by the Romans? How did rum grog help the British navy defeat Napoleon? What is the relationship between coffee and revolution? And how did Coca-Cola become the number one poster-product for globalization decades before the term was even coined? From the Hardcover edition.

The Art of Social Media

Power Tips for Power Users

Author: Guy Kawasaki,Peg Fitzpatrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1591848075

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 196

View: 9488

"A bottom-up strategy [intended] to produce a focused, thorough, and compelling presence on the most popular social-media platforms ... [guiding] you through steps to build your foundation, amass your digital assets, optimize your profile, attract more followers, and effectively integrate social media and blogging"--Amazon.com.

Communication Technology Update

Author: August E. Grant,Ashley J. Bennington

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 1483142078

Category: Social Science

Page: 396

View: 9745

Communication Technology Update, Third Edition provides the latest information on as many communication technologies as possible, using as many specific statistics on market share, units sold, etc., as possible to allow comparison among the technologies. This book is designed to help make sense of the spectrum of communication technologies. The text explores the widest possible range of technologies, from broadcast to telephony and from wired to wireless. In discussing each technology, this book will not only deal with the hardware of the technology, but also with the software, organizational structure, political and economic influences, and individual users of the technologies. Major developments in each of these areas are presented for each technology, along with background information to help explain the major factors in the evolution of the technology. The first chapter begins by defining communication technology and introducing the ""umbrella perspective"" used to present and analyze each technology. Following this discussion, an overview of the remainder of the book is presented. This book targets two groups of users. One of which is the group of communication professionals who have a desire to keep up with the latest developments both within and adjacent to their particular fields. Second is the group of students who are studying communication technology and need information that is more current than that provided by a textbook and more comprehensive than that found in trade magazines.

The Victorian Internet

The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-line Pioneers

Author: Tom Standage

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0802713424

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 1385

Offers a historical review of the telegraph network, from its invention by Samuel Morse in the nineteenth century to the present day, exploring the social and political effects it has had on the world throughout its existence.

Fahrenheit 451

A Novel

Author: Ray Bradbury

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451673310

Category: Fiction

Page: 159

View: 8457

A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners, Guy Montag, suddenly realizes their merit.

Your Happiness Was Hacked

Why Tech Is Winning the Battle to Control Your Brain--and How to Fight Back

Author: Vivek Wadhwa,Alex Salkever

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1523095857

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 192

View: 7941

Your Happiness Was Hacked Why Tech Is Winning the Battle to Control Your Brain—and How to Fight Back Do you feel in control of your life or enslaved by your devices? Have you risked your life texting and driving? Do you sympathize with a test group of students who endured painful shocks rather than be separated from their phones? Digital technology is wonderful, but it's making us miserable, say former tech executives Vivek Wadhwa and Alex Salkever. There's a reason Apple CEO Tim Cook told the Guardian he won't let his nephew on social networks. We've become a nation of tech addicts—although it's not entirely our fault, and it is possible to enjoy the benefits of technology while taking our happiness back from the bots. Wadhwa and Salkever describe the applied neuroscience techniques developers are using to make their products so insidiously habit-forming and, drawing on the latest research, detail the negative impact of technology in four key areas: love, work, play, and life. There are dozens of vivid examples. Online dating apps like Tinder encourage users to evaluate people like products, leading to superficial, unsatisfying relationships. Workers check their email an average of seventy-seven times a day, wreaking havoc on productivity. Children now spend nearly twice as much time playing inside with their screens as they do outside in the natural world—it is any wonder childhood obesity is a problem? The light from the devices so many of us look at right before we go to sleep suppresses the production of melatonin, a hormone vital for sleep and healthy organ functioning. But there's a way out. Wadhwa and Salkever lay out simple, common-sense ways to disrupt developers' efforts to get you hooked, including six simple questions to help you decide what role any given technology should play in your life. Ironically, they even describe some emerging technologies designed to give users more control. Get back to making technology serve you, not the other way around!

Pressed for Time

The Acceleration of Life in Digital Capitalism

Author: Judy Wajcman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022619647X

Category: Computers

Page: 215

View: 8821

[Here], Judy Wajcman explains why we immediately interpret our experiences with digital technology as inexorably accelerating everyday life. She argues that we are not mere hostages to communication devices, and the sense of always being rushed is the result of the priorities and parameters we ourselves set rather than the machines that help us set them. ..."--Book jacket.

My European Family

The First 54,000 Years

Author: Karin Bojs

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472941497

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 9064

Karin Bojs grew up in a small, broken family. At her mother's funeral she felt this more keenly than ever. As a science journalist she was eager to learn more about herself, her family and the interconnectedness of society. After all, we're all related. And in a sense, we are all family. My European Family tells the story of Europe and its people through its genetic legacy, from the first wave of immigration to the present day, weaving in the latest archaeological findings. Karin goes deep in search of her genealogy; by having her DNA sequenced she was able to trace the path of her ancestors back through the Viking and Bronze ages to the Neolithic and beyond into prehistory, even back to a time when Neanderthals ran the European show. Travelling to dozens of countries to follow the story, she learns about early farmers in the Middle East and flute-playing cavemen in Germany and France, and a whole host of other fascinating characters. This book looks at genetics from a uniquely pan-European perspective, with the author meeting dozens of geneticists, historians and archaeologists in the course of her research. The genes of this seemingly ordinary modern European woman have a truly fascinating story to tell, and in many ways it is the true story of Europe. At a time when politics is pushing nations apart, this book shows that, ultimately, our genes will always bind us together.

The Handmaid's Tale

Author: Margaret Atwood

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547345666

Category: Fiction

Page: 311

View: 2999

Now a Hulu Original Series The Handmaid’s Tale is a novel of such power that the reader will be unable to forget its images and its forecast. Set in the near future, it describes life in what was once the United States and is now called the Republic of Gilead, a monotheocracy that has reacted to social unrest and a sharply declining birthrate by reverting to, and going beyond, the repressive intolerance of the original Puritans. The regime takes the Book of Genesis absolutely at its word, with bizarre consequences for the women and men in its population. The story is told through the eyes of Offred, one of the unfortunate Handmaids under the new social order. In condensed but eloquent prose, by turns cool-eyed, tender, despairing, passionate, and wry, she reveals to us the dark corners behind the establishment’s calm facade, as certain tendencies now in existence are carried to their logical conclusions. The Handmaid’s Tale is funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing. It is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and a tour de force. It is Margaret Atwood at her best.

Walls

A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick

Author: David Frye

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501172727

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8664

In Walls historian David Frye tells the epic story of history’s greatest manmade barriers, from ancient times to the present. It is a haunting and frequently eye-opening saga—one that reveals a startling link between what we build and how we live. With Frye as our raconteur-guide, we journey back to a time before barriers of brick and stone even existed—to an era in which nomadic tribes vied for scarce resources, and each man was bred to a life of struggle. Ultimately, those same men would create edifices of mud, brick, and stone, and with them effectively divide humanity: on one side were those the walls protected; on the other, those the walls kept out. The stars of this narrative are the walls themselves—rising up in places as ancient and exotic as Mesopotamia, Babylon, Greece, China, Rome, Mongolia, Afghanistan, the lower Mississippi and even Central America. As we journey across time and place, we discover a hidden, thousand-mile-long wall in Asia’s steppes; learn of bizarre Spartan rituals; watch Mongol chieftains lead their miles-long hordes; witness the epic siege of Constantinople; chill at the fate of French explorers; marvel at the folly of the Maginot Line; tense at the gathering crisis in Cold War Berlin; gape at Hollywood’s gated royalty; and contemplate the wall mania of our own era. A masterpiece of historical recovery and preeminent storytelling, Walls is alternately evocative, amusing, chilling, and deeply insightful as it gradually reveals the startling ways that barriers have affected our psyches. The questions this book summons are both intriguing and profound: Did walls make civilization possible? And can we live without them?

The Turk

The Life and Times of the Famous Eighteenth-Century Chess-Playing Machine

Author: Tom Standage

Publisher: Berkley Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780425190395

Category: Games

Page: 272

View: 1105

Describes the eighteenth-century invention by Wolfgang von Kempeden of the Turk, a mechanical man fashioned of wood, powered by clockwork, and capable of playing chess, examining the machine's remarkable career in light of the industrial revolution and the impact of the invention on the history of technology. Reprint.

American Girls

Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers

Author: Nancy Jo Sales

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804173184

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 4740

Instagram. Whisper. Yik Yak. Vine. YouTube. Kik. Ask.fm. Tinder. The dominant force in the lives of girls coming of age in America today is social media. What it is doing to an entire generation of young women is the subject of award-winning Vanity Fairwriter Nancy Jo Sales's riveting and explosive American Girls. With extraordinary intimacy and precision, Sales captures what it feels like to be a girl in America today. From Montclair to Manhattan and Los Angeles, from Florida and Arizona to Texas and Kentucky, Sales crisscrossed the country, speaking to more than two hundred girls, ages thirteen to nineteen, and documenting a massive change in the way girls are growing up, a phenomenon that transcends race, geography, and household income. American Girlsprovides a disturbing portrait of the end of childhood as we know it and of the inexorable and ubiquitous experience of a new kind of adolescence-one dominated by new social and sexual norms, where a girl's first crushes and experiences of longing and romance occur in an accelerated electronic environment; where issues of identity and self-esteem are magnified and transformed by social platforms that provide instantaneous judgment. What does it mean to be a girl in America in 2016? It means coming of age online in a hypersexualized culture that has normalized extreme behavior, from pornography to the casual exchange of nude photographs; a culture rife with a virulent new strain of sexism and a sometimes self-undermining notion of feminist empowerment; a culture in which teenagers are spending so much time on technology and social media that they are not developing basic communication skills. From beauty gurus to slut-shaming to a disconcerting trend of exhibitionism, Nancy Jo Sales provides a shocking window into the troubling world of today's teenage girls. Provocative and urgent, American Girlsis destined to ignite a much-needed conversation about how we can help our daughters and sons negotiate unprecedented new challenges. From the Hardcover edition.

The Clock Of The Long Now

Time and Responsibility

Author: Stewart Brand

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780786722921

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 7505

Using the designing and building of the Clock of the Long Now as a framework, this is a book about the practical use of long time perspective: how to get it, how to use it, how to keep it in and out of sight. Here are the central questions it inspires: How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? Discipline in thought allows freedom. One needs the space and reliability to predict continuity to have the confidence not to be afraid of revolutions Taking the time to think of the future is more essential now than ever, as culture accelerates beyond its ability to be measured Probable things are vastly outnumbered by countless near-impossible eventualities. Reality is statistically forced to be extraordinary; fiction is not allowed this freedom This is a potent book that combines the chronicling of fantastic technology with equally visionary philosophical inquiry.

A Little History of the World

Illustrated Edition

Author: E. H. Gombrich

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300213972

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7201

E. H. Gombrich's Little History of the World, though written in 1935, has become one of the treasures of historical writing since its first publication in English in 2005. The Yale edition alone has now sold over half a million copies, and the book is available worldwide in almost thirty languages. Gombrich was of course the best-known art historian of his time, and his text suggests illustrations on every page. This illustrated edition of the Little History brings together the pellucid humanity of his narrative with the images that may well have been in his mind's eye as he wrote the book. The two hundred illustrations—most of them in full color—are not simple embellishments, though they are beautiful. They emerge from the text, enrich the author's intention, and deepen the pleasure of reading this remarkable work. For this edition the text is reset in a spacious format, flowing around illustrations that range from paintings to line drawings, emblems, motifs, and symbols. The book incorporates freshly drawn maps, a revised preface, and a new index. Blending high-grade design, fine paper, and classic binding, this is both a sumptuous gift book and an enhanced edition of a timeless account of human history.