Writing Gender History

Author: Laura Lee Downs

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 736

How has feminist scholarship changed history? Writing Gender History explores the evolution of historical writing about women and gender from the 1930s until the early twenty-first century. With chapters on the history of Europe, the USA, colonial India and Africa, the discussion moves from women's history to gender history, and then to poststructuralist challenges to that history. This revised edition includes an exciting new chapter looking at recent scholarship on race, gender and sexuality in colonial and transnational history, and on the history of the body. Highly accessibly but also encouraging new debate, this book provides students with a comprehensive understanding of gender history, as well as its possible future.

Writing Women's History Since the Renaissance

Author: Mary Spongberg

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 525

The complaint of Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, that history has 'hardly any women at all' is not an uncommon one. Yet there is evidence to suggest that women have engaged in historical writing since ancient times. This study traces the history of women's historical writing, reclaiming the lives of individual women historians, recovering women's historical writings from the past and focusing on how gender has shaped the genre of history. Mary Spongberg brings together for the first time an extensive survey of the progress of women's historical writing from the Renaissance to the present, demonstrating the continuities between women's historical writings in the past and the development of a distinctly woman-centred historiography. Writing Women's History since the Renaissance also examines the relationship between women's history and the development of feminist consciousness, suggesting that the study of history has alerted women to their unequal status and enabled them to use history to achieve women's rights. Whether feminist or anti-feminist, women who have had their historical writings published have served as role models for women seeking a voice in the public sphere and have been instrumental in encouraging the growth of a feminist discourse.

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing

Author: Rohan Amanda Maitzen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 530

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Writing Contemporary History

Author: Robert Gildea

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 866

This book brings together the world's most pre-eminent historians to discuss the ten core issues confronting students of contemporary history today. As part of the "Writing History" series, this volume combines theoretical reflection with the practice of producing historical texts. It introduces the reader to important theoretical approaches in the field of contemporary history writing and how these approaches have shaped this important sub-discipline. Each chapter frames the contribution of two scholars both in parallel thought and opposition. Questions include whether the role of gender history has a future and the proper time period referred to as "colonial history" and the definition of cultural history.

Gender and the Politics of History

Author: Joan Wallach Scott

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 682

This landmark work from a renowned feminist historian is a foundational demonstration of the uses of gender as a conceptual tool for cultural and historical analysis. Joan Wallach Scott offers a trenchant critique of the compartmentalization of women’s history, arguing that political and social categories are always fundamentally shaped by gender and that questions of gender are essential to considerations of difference in history. Exploring topics ranging from language and class to the politics of work and family, Gender and the Politics of History is a vital contribution to feminist history and historical methodology that also speaks more broadly to the ongoing redefinition of gender in our political and cultural vocabularies. This anniversary edition of a classic text in feminist theory and history shows the evergreen relevance of Scott’s work to the humanities and social sciences. In a new preface, Scott reflects on the book’s legacy and implications for contemporary politics as well as what she has reconsidered as a result of her engagement with psychoanalytic theory. The book also includes a previously unpublished essay, “The Conundrum of Equality,” which takes up issues concerning affirmative action.

Gender Differences and the Making of Liturgical History

Lifting a Veil on Liturgy's Past

Author: Professor Teresa Berger

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 194

Mapping uncharted territory in the study of liturgy's past, this book offers a history to contemporary questions around gender and liturgical life. Teresa Berger looks at liturgy's past through the lens of gender history, understood as attending not only to the historically prominent binary of "men" and "women" but to all gender identities, including inter-sexed persons, ascetic virgins, eunuchs, and priestly men. Demonstrating what a gender-attentive inquiry is able to achieve, Berger explores both traditional fundamentals such as liturgical space and eucharistic practice and also new ways of studying the past, for example by asking about the developing link between liturgical presiding and priestly masculinity. Drawing on historical case studies and focusing particularly on the early centuries of Christian worship, this book ultimately aims at the present by lifting a veil on liturgy's past to allow for a richly diverse notion of gender differences as these continue to shape liturgical life.

Writing Women in Central America

Gender and the Fictionalization of History

Author: Laura Barbas-Rhoden

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 201

View: 930

What is the relationship between history and fiction in a place with a contentious past? And of what concern is gender in the telling of stories about the past? This study explores these questions as it considers key Central American texts.

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

Volume 3: 1400-1800

Author: Masayuki Sato

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 752

View: 728

Offers essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from c.1400 to c.1800.

Liturgy's Imagined Past/s

Methodologies and Materials in the Writing of Liturgical History Today

Author: Teresa Berger

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 705

This book calls attention to the importance of scholarly reflection on the writing of liturgical history. The essays not only probe the impact of important shifts in historiography but also present new scholarship that promises to reconfigure some of the established images of liturgy’s past. Based on papers presented at the 2014 Yale Institute of Sacred Music Liturgy Conference, Liturgy’s Imagined Past/s seeks to invigorate discussion of methodologies and materials in contemporary writings on liturgy’s pasts and to resource such writing at a point in time when formidable questions are being posed about the way in which historians construct the object of their inquiry.

Gender History in Practice

Historical Perspectives on Bodies, Class & Citizenship

Author: Kathleen Canning

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 740

The eight essays collected in this volume examine the practice of gender history and its impact on our understanding of European history. Each essay takes up a major methodological or theoretical issue in feminist history and illustrates the necessity of critiquing and redefining the concepts of body, citizenship, class, and experience through historical case studies. Kathleen Canning opens the book with a new overview of the state of the art in European gender history. She considers how gender history has revised the master narratives in some fields within modern European history (such as the French Revolution) but has had a lesser impact in others (Weimar and Nazi Germany).Gender History in Practice includes two essays now regarded as classics?"Feminist History after the 'Linguistic Turn'" and "The Body as Method"—as well as new chapters on experience, citizenship, and subjectivity. Other essays in the book draw on Canning's work at the intersection of labor history, the history of the welfare state, and the history of the body, showing how the gendered "social body" was shaped in Imperial Germany. The book concludes with a pair of essays on the concepts of class and citizenship in German history, offering critical perspectives on feminist understandings of citizenship. Featuring an extensive thematic bibliography of influential works in gender history and theory that will prove invaluable to students and scholars, Gender History in Practice offers new insights into the history of Germany and Central Europe as well as a timely assessment of gender history's accomplishments and challenges.