Women, Islam, and the State

Author: Deniz Kandiyoti

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9780877227861

Category: Religion

Page: 276

View: 3326

This collection of original essays examines the relationship between Islam, the nature of state projects, and the position of women in the modern nation states of the Middle East and South Asia. Arguing that Islam is not uniform across Muslim societies and that women's roles in these societies cannot be understood simply by looking at texts and laws. the contributors focus, instead, on the effects of the political projects of states on the lives of women.--provided by publisher.

Women, Gender, and Terrorism

Author: Laura Sjoberg,Caron E. Gentry

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820335835

Category: Political Science

Page: 250

View: 9289

In the last decade the world has witnessed a rise in women's participation in terrorism. Women, Gender, and Terrorism explores women's relationship with terrorism, with a keen eye on the political, gender, racial, and cultural dynamics of the contemporary world. Throughout most of the twentieth century, it was rare to hear about women terrorists. In the new millennium, however, women have increas­ingly taken active roles in carrying out suicide bombings, hijacking air­planes, and taking hostages in such places as Palestine, Iraq, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Lebanon, and Chechnya. These women terrorists have been the subject of a substantial amount of media and scholarly attention, but the analysis of women, gender, and terrorism has been sparse and riddled with stereotypical thinking about women's capabilities and motivations. In the first section of this volume, contributors offer an overview of women's participation in and relationships with contemporary terrorism, and a historical chapter traces their involvement in the politics and conflicts of Islamic societies. The next section includes empirical and theoretical analysis of terrorist movements in Chechnya, Kashmir, Palestine, and Sri Lanka. The third section turns to women's involvement in al Qaeda and includes critical interrogations of the gendered media and the scholarly presentations of those women. The conclusion offers ways to further explore the subject of gender and terrorism based on the contributions made to the volume. Contributors to Women, Gender, and Terrorism expand our understanding of terrorism, one of the most troubling and complicated facets of the modern world.

Byzantine Women

Varieties of Experience 800-1200

Author: Lynda Garland

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754657378

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 4011

This volume brings together a group of international scholars in new explorations of the world of Byzantine women in the period 800-1200. The specific aim of this collection is to investigate the participation of women - non-imperial women in particular - in supposedly 'masculine' fields of operation. Contributions focus on women's participation in the street life of Constantinople, their appearance in Byzantine fiscal documents, their monastic foundations, their costume and engagement with entertainment at the imperial court, and the way heroines are portrayed in the Byzantine novels.

Bad women, mad women

Author: Maria Gerolemou

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3823365800

Category: Greek drama (Tragedy)

Page: 442

View: 2358

Perfecting Women

Maulana Ashraf 'Ali Thanawi's Bihishti Zewar

Author: Ashraf ʻAlī Thānvī,Barbara Daly Metcalf

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520080935

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 6539

Challenging conventional notions about the place of women in Muslim societies, the Bihishti Zewar (Heavenly Ornaments) gives life to the themes of religious and social reform that have too often been treated in the abstract. This instructional guidebook, used by the world's largest population of Muslims, is a vital source for those interested in modern Indian social and intellectual history, in Islamic reform, and in conceptions of gender and women's roles. The Bihishti Zewar was written in northern India in the early 1900s by a revered Muslim scholar and spiritual guide, Maulana Ashraf 'Ali Thanawi (1864-1943), to instruct Muslim girls and women in religious teachings, proper behavior, and prudent conduct of their everyday lives. In so doing, it sets out the core of a reformist version of Islam that has become increasingly prominent across Muslim societies during the past hundred years. Throughout the work, nothing is more striking than the extent to which the book takes women and men as essentially the same, in contrast to European works directed toward women at this time. Its rich descriptions of the everyday life of the relatively privileged classes in turn-of-the-century north India provide information on issues of personality formation as well as on family life, social relations, household management, and encounters with new institutions and inventions. Barbara Metcalf has carefully selected those sections of the Bihishti Zewar that best illustrate the themes of reformist thought about God, the person, society, and gender. She provides a substantial introduction to the text and to each section, as well as detailed annotations.

Women, Politics, and the United Nations

Author: Anne Winslow

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313295225

Category: Political Science

Page: 213

View: 3951

Participants and scholars appraise the successes and failures of women's agendas at the UN and international conferences for equality and full partnership.

What Happened to the Women?

Gender and Reparations for Human Rights Violations

Author: Ruth Rubio-Marín

Publisher: SSRC

ISBN: 0979077206

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 7025

The first volume of the International Center for Transitional Justice's new Advancing Transitional Justice Series. Published with the support of the International Development Research Centre. What happens to women whose lives are transformed by human rights violations? What happens to the voices of victimized women once they have their day in court or in front of a truth commission? Women face a double marginalization under authoritarian regimes and during and after violent conflicts. Nonetheless, reparations programs are rarely designed to address the needs of women victims. What Happened to the Women? Gender and Reparations for Human Rights Violations, argues for the introduction of a gender dimension into reparations programs. The volume explores gender and reparations policies in Guatemala, Peru, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Timor-Leste.

Women, Gender, and Language in Morocco

Author: Fatima Sadiqi

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004128530

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 5098

This text is an original investigation in the complex relationship between women, gender, and language in a Muslim, multilingual, and multicultural setting. Moroccan women's use of monolingualism (oral literature) and multilingualism (code-switching) reflects their agency and gender-role subversion in a heavily patriarchal society.

Violence Against Women

Author: Claire M. Renzetti,Raquel Kennedy Bergen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742530553

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 297

View: 6764

This is an edited volume of 12 articles previously published in Social Problems that may be considered among the most influential in the development of the sociological study of violence against women.

Women Medievalists and the Academy

Author: Jane Chance

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299207502

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1073

View: 3138

Long overlooked in standard reference works, pioneering women medievalists finally receive their due in Women Medievalists and the Academy. This comprehensive edited volume brings to life a diverse collection of inspiring figures through memoirs, biographical essays, and interviews. Covering many different nationalities and academic disciplines—including literature, philology, history, archaeology, art history, theology (or religious studies), and philosophy—each essay delves into one woman’s life, intellectual contributions, and efforts to succeed in a male-dominated field. Together, these extraordinary personal histories constitute a new standard reference that speaks to a growing interest in women’s roles in the development of scholarship and the academy. The collection begins in the seventeenth century with Elizabeth Elstob and continues through the twentieth century, and includes—among more than seventy profiles—such important figures as Anna Jameson, Lina Eckenstein, Georgiana Goddard King, Eileen [Edna Le Poer] Power, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Whitelock, Susan Mosher Stuard, Marcia Colish, and Caroline Walker Bynum, among others.

The Women

Author: Clare Boothe Luce

Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc

ISBN: 9780822212706

Category: Drama

Page: 92

View: 5514

THE STORY: The author carries us through a number of varied scenes and shows us not only a somewhat unflattering picture of womanhood, but digging under the surface, reveals a human understanding for and sympathy with some of its outstanding figure

Women, Gender, and Human Rights

A Global Perspective

Author: Marjorie Agosín

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813529837

Category: Political Science

Page: 339

View: 4574

II: WOMEN AND HEALTH

Women and Monarchy in Macedonia

Author: Elizabeth Donnelly Carney

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806132129

Category: History

Page: 369

View: 4115

In this groundbreaking work, Elizabeth Donnelly Carney examines the role of royal women in the Macedonian Argead dynasty from the sixth century B.C. to 168 B.C. Women were excluded from the exercise of power in most of the Hellenic world. However, Carney shows that the wives, mothers, and daughters of kings sometimes played important roles in Macedonian public life and occasionally determined the course of national events. Carney assembles an exhaustive array of evidence on the political role of Argead royal women. In addition, she presents a series of biographical sketches describing the public careers of all the royal women -- including Olympias, mother of Alexander the Great, and the warrior Cynnane, his half-sister -- whose names are preserved in ancient sources. Women and Monarchy in Macedonia fills a growing need for an updated survey of the subject, corrects previously held assumptions, and offers a fresh interpretation of the status, function, influence, and authority of women in the ancient world.

Women in Iran from the Rise of Islam to 1800

Author: Guity Nashat,Lois Beck

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252071218

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 5513

Combining scholarship from a range of disciplines, this collection of essays is a comprehensive examination of the role of women in Iranian society and culture, from pre-Islamic times to 1800. The contributors challenge common assumptions about women in Iran and Islam. Sweeping away modern myths, these essays show that women have had significant influence in almost every area of Iranian life. Focusing on a region wider than today's nation-state of Iran, this book explores developments in the spheres that most affect women: gender constructs, family structure, community roles, education, economic participation, Islamic practices and institutions, politics, and artistic representations. The contributors to this volume are among the most prominent international scholars working in this field, and each draws on decades of research to address the history of Iranian women within the context of his or her area of expertise. This broad framework allows for a thorough and nuanced examination of the history of a complex society.

Edging Women Out

Victorian Novelists, Publishers and Social Change

Author: Gaye Tuchman,Nina E. Fortin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415533244

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 266

View: 2626

Before about 1840, there was little prestige attached to the writing of novels, and most English novelists were women. By the turn of the twentieth century, "men of letters" acclaimed novels as a form of great literature, and most critically successful novelists were men. In the book, sociologist Gaye Tuchman examines how men succeeded in redefining a form of culture and in invading a white-collar occupation previously practiced mostly by women. Tuchman documents how men gradually supplanted women as novelists once novel-writing was perceived as potentially profitable, in part because of changes in the system of publishing and rewarding authors. Drawing on unusual data ranging from the archives of Macmillan and company (London) to an analysis of the lives and accomplishments of authors listed in the Dictionary of National Biography, she shows that rising literacy and the centralization of the publishing industry in London after 1840 increased literary opportunities and fostered men’s success as novelists. Men redefined the nature of a good novel and applied a double standard in critically evaluating literary works by men and by women. They also received better contracts than women for novels of equivalent quality and sales. They were able to accomplish this, says Tuchman, because they were to a large extent the culture brokers – the publishers, publishers’ readers, and reviewers of an elite art form. Both a sociological study of occupational gender transformation and a historical study of writing and publishing, this book will be a rich resource for students of the sociology of culture, literary criticism, and women’s studies.

Women, Gender, and Technology

Author: Mary Frank Fox

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252073363

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 8922

Each of the ten chapters in Women, Gender, and Technology explores a different aspect of how gender and technology work--and are at work--in particular domains, including film narratives, reproductive technologies, information technology, and the profession of engineering. The volume's contributors include representatives of over half a dozen different disciplines, and each provides a novel perspective on the foundational idea that gender and technology co-create one another. Together, their articles provide a window on to the rich and complex issues that arise in the attempt to understand the relationship between these profoundly intertwined notions.

Women Writers of Traditional China

An Anthology of Poetry and Criticism

Author: Kang-i Sun Chang,Haun Saussy,Charles Yim-tze Kwong

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804732314

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 891

View: 9891

The book also includes an extended section of criticism by and about women writers.

City of Women

Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860

Author: Christine Stansell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252014819

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 1407

Women, the Family, and Freedom: 1750-1880

Author: Susan G. Bell,Karen M. Offen

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804711715

Category: Social Science

Page: 561

View: 7329

This is the first book in a two-part collection of 264 primary source documents from the Enlightenment to 1950 chronicling the public debate that raged in Europe and America over the role of women in Western society. The present volume looks at the period from 1750 to 1880. The central issues—motherhood, women's legal position in the family, equality of the sexes, the effect on social stability of women's education and labor—extended to women the struggle by men for personal and political liberty. These issues were political, economic, and religious dynamite. They exploded in debates of philosophers, political theorists, scientists, novelists, and religious and political leaders. This collection emphasizes the debate by juxtaposing prevailing and dissenting points of view at given historical moments (e.g. Madame de Staël vs. Rousseau, Eleanor Marx vs. Pope Leo XIII, Strindberg vs. Ibsen, Simone de Beauvoir vs. Margaret Mead). Each section is preceded by a contextual headnote pinpointing the documents significance. Many of the documents have been translated into English for the first time.