Which Policy for Europe?

Power and Conflict inside the European Commission

Author: Miriam Hartlapp

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 547

The European Commission is at the center of the European Union's political system. Within its five-year terms each Commission proposes up to 2000 binding legal acts and therefore crucially shapes EU policy, which in turn impacts on the daily lives of more than 500 million European citizens. However, despite the Commissions key role in setting the agenda for European decision making, little is known about its internal dynamics when preparing legislation. This book provides a problem-driven, theoretically-founded, and empirically rich treatment of the so far still understudied process of position-formation inside the European Commission. It reveals that various internal political positions prevail and that the role of power and conflict inside the European Commission is essential to understanding its policy proposals. Opening the 'black box' of the Commission, the book identifies three ideal types of internal position-formation. The Commission is motivated by technocratic problem-solving, by competence-seeking utility maximization or ideologically-motivated policyseeking. Specifying conditions that favor one logic over the others, the typology furthers understanding of how the EU system functions and provides novel explanations of EU policies with substantial societal implications.

The European Commission and Europe's Democratic Process

Why the EU’s Executive Faces an Uncertain Future

Author: Stuart A. Brown

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 112

View: 429

This book examines the multitude of challenges which the European Commission faces: once the centre of political gravity in Europe’s integration process, the growth of Euroscepticism and the emergence of new institutional rivals threaten to undermine its status as an institution. Tracing the roots of the Commission’s decline from the early 1990s through to the Eurozone and refugee crises, Stuart A Brown draws on new evidence to illustrate why the EU’s executive now faces a battle for its future, and asks whether in the reforms of Jean-Claude Juncker the Commission may be facing its last chance. This study will appeal to students and scholars in EU institutions, politics, and public policy.

Commentary on the EU Treaties and the Charter of Fundamental Rights

Author: Marcus Klamert

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 2464

View: 149

This Commentary provides an article-by-article summary of the TEU, the TFEU, and the Charter of Fundamental Rights, offering a quick reference to the provisions of the Treaties and how they are interpreted and applied in practice. Written by a team of contributors drawn from the Legal Service of the European Commission and academia, the Commentary offers expert guidance to practitioners and academics seeking fast access to the Treaties and current practice. The Commentary follows a set structure, offering a short overview of the Article, the Article text itself, a key references list including essential case law and legislation, and a structured commentary on the Article itself. The editors and contributors combine experience in practice with a strong academic background and have published widely on a variety of EU law subjects.

A Global Security Triangle

European, African and Asian Interaction

Author: Valeria Bello

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 183

This book considers the interactions between Africa, Asia and Europe, analysing the short and long term strategies various states have adopted to external relations. The urgency attached to the agenda of international terrorism and human and drugs- trafficking has forced the European Union into new cooperation with Africa and Asia. These inter-regional relations have taken on new dimensions in the context of contemporary international politics framed by new security challenges, and new competitive forces particularly from Asia. This book provides both conceptual and empirical arguments to offer an innovative perspective on the EU as a global actor. It demonstrates how these three regions interact politically and economically to address global challenges as well as global opportunities, and thus provides an assessment of the multilateralism which the EU clearly stated in its Security Strategy paper. Addressing a broad range of topical issues, the book features chapters on European Security; European Migration Policy; African Union and its peace and security policy; Terrorism and international security; China and its fast growing global role; India, the biggest democracy in the world; and the impact of the Asian economic growth on the global economy. Further it compares the different backgrounds, forms and priorities of regional integrations. A Global Security Triangle will be of interest to all scholars of European politics, security studies, African and Asian studies, and International Relations.

Demystifying the European Union

The Enduring Logic of Regional Integration

Author: Roy H. Ginsberg

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 423

View: 574

By comparing and contrasting the EU to another union of States across the Atlantic, the United States, this text introduces readers to the historical, legal, economic, and political foundations of European integration, while focusing extensively on the effects of the EU on its own citizens and on the outside world.

The EU's Role in Global Governance

The Legal Dimension

Author: Bart Van Vooren

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 943

For years the European Union has been looked on as a potential model for cosmopolitan governance, and enjoyed considerable influence on the global stage. The EU has a uniquely strong and legally binding mission statement to pursue international relations on a multilateral basis, founded on the progressive development of international law. The political vision was for the EU to export its values of the rule of law and sophisticated governance mechanisms to the international sphere. Globalization and the financial crisis have starkly illustrated the limits of this vision, and the EU's dependence on global forces partially beyond the control of traditional provinces of law. This book takes stock of the EU's role in global governance. It asks: to what extent can and does the EU shape and influence the on-going re-ordering of legal processes, principles, and institutions of global governance, in line with its optimistic mission statement? With this ambitious remit it covers the legal-institutional and substantive aspects of global security, trade, environmental, financial, and social governance. Across these topics 23 contributors have taken the central question of the extent of the EU's influence on global governance, providing a broad view across the key areas as well as a detailed analysis of each. Through comparison and direct engagement with each other, the different chapters provide a distinctive contribution to legal scholarship on global governance, from a European perspective.

Governing the World

The History of an Idea, 1815 to the Present

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 496

View: 247

The story of global cooperation between nations and peoples is a tale of dreamers goading us to find common cause in remedying humanity’s worst problems. But international institutions have also provided a tool for the powers that be to advance their own interests and stamp their imprint on the world. Mark Mazower’s Governing the World tells the epic story of that inevitable and irresolvable tension—the unstable and often surprising alchemy between ideas and power. From the beginning, the willingness of national leaders to cooperate has been spurred by crisis: the book opens in 1815, amid the rubble of the Napoleonic Empire, as the Concert of Europe was assembled with an avowed mission to prevent any single power from dominating the continent and to stamp out revolutionary agitation before it could lead to war. But if the Concert was a response to Napoleon, internationalism was a response to the Concert, and as courts and monarchs disintegrated they were replaced by revolutionaries and bureaucrats. 19th century internationalists included bomb-throwing anarchists and the secret policemen who fought them, Marxist revolutionaries and respectable free marketeers. But they all embraced nationalism, the age’s most powerful transformative political creed, and assumed that nationalism and internationalism would go hand in hand. The wars of the twentieth century saw the birth of institutions that enshrined many of those ideals in durable structures of authority, most notably the League of Nations in World War I and the United Nations after World War II. Throughout this history, we see that international institutions are only as strong as the great powers of the moment allow them to be. The League was intended to prop up the British empire. With Washington taking over world leadership from Whitehall, the United Nations became a useful extension of American power. But as Mazower shows us, from the late 1960s on, America lost control over the dialogue and the rise of the independent Third World saw a marked shift away from the United Nations and toward more pliable tools such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. From the 1990s to 2007, Governing the World centers on a new regime of global coordination built upon economic rule-making by central bankers and finance ministers, a regime in which the interests of citizens and workers are trumped by the iron logic of markets. Now, the era of Western dominance of international life is fast coming to an end and a new multi-centered global balance of forces is emerging. We are living in a time of extreme confusion about the purpose and durability of our international institutions. History is not prophecy, but Mark Mazower shows us why the current dialectic between ideals and power politics in the international arena is just another stage in an epic two-hundred-year story.

The Further Enlargement of the EU

Threat Or Opportunity? : Report with Evidence

Author: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. European Union Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: European Union

Page: 290

View: 395

When Bulgaria and Romania join in January 20097, the EU will have grown from an original 6 to 27 countries. This report looks at the impact of the various enlargements; current attitudes to further enlargement; the concept of absorption capacity and the debate concerning the borders of Europe. It also takes a detailed look at candidates and potential candidates for membership and considers possible alternatives to enlargement and probable costs of not enlarging.

The European Commission of the Twenty-First Century

Author: Hussein Kassim

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 381

View: 978

Co-authored by an international team of researchers, this book draws on original data from the largest attitudinal survey ever conducted by independent researchers inside the Commission, as well as a structured programme of interviews with senior officials. It provides an authoritative account of the European Commission of the twenty-first century and tests, challenges and refutes many widely held myths about the Commission and the people who work for it.