When Google Met Wikileaks

Author: Julian Assange

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 223

View: 590

In June 2011, Julian Assange received an unusual visitor: the chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt, arrived from America at Ellingham Hall, the country residence in Norfolk, England where Assange was living under house arrest. For several hours the besieged leader of the world's most famous insurgent publishing organization and the billionaire head of the world's largest information empire locked horns. The two men debated the political problems faced by society, and the technological solutions engendered by the global network--from the Arab Spring to Bitcoin. They outlined radically opposing perspectives: for Assange, the liberating power of the Internet is based on its freedom and statelessness.For Schmidt, emancipation is at one with US foreign policy objectives and is driven by connecting non-Western countries to American companies and markets. These differences embodied a tug-of-war over the Internet's future that has only gathered force subsequently. When Google Met WikiLeaks presents the story of Assange and Schmidt's encounter. Both fascinating and alarming, it contains an edited transcript of their conversation and extensive, new material, written by Assange specifically for this book, providing the best available summary of his vision for the future of the Internet.

The Stack

On Software and Sovereignty

Author: Benjamin H. Bratton

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 528

View: 707

A comprehensive political and design theory of planetary-scale computation proposing that The Stack -- an accidental megastructure -- is both a technological apparatus and a model for a new geopolitical architecture.

The Social Media Revolution: An Economic Encyclopedia of Friending, Following, Texting, and Connecting

An Economic Encyclopedia of Friending, Following, Texting, and Connecting

Author: Jarice Hanson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 441

View: 729

Social media shapes the ways in which we communicate, think about friends, and hear about news and current events. It also affects how users think of themselves, their communities, and their place in the world. This book examines the tremendous impact of social media on daily life. • Provides an insightful perspective on the past and future that demonstrates how the technologies of communication serve to create the nexus of social interaction • Examines the fundamental need and desire of humanity to communicate, which in turn determines what we think of ourselves, how we see the world, and how we make meaning • Focuses on social media as a powerful tool, not only for communication and entertainment but also for potentially equalizing power and social mobility locally, nationally, and globally • Considers the financial impact of social media as it challenges legacy media for consumers, users, and audiences

How I Lost By Hillary Clinton

Author:

Publisher: OR Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 262

View: 562

Judging by the stance of the leadership of the Democratic Party and much of the media, Hillary Clinton’s devastating loss in the presidential election of November 2016 was all the fault of pernicious Russian leaks, unwarranted FBI investigations and a skewed electoral college. Rarely blamed was the party’s decision to run a deeply unpopular candidate on an uninspiring platform. At a time of widespread dissatisfaction with business-as-usual politics, the Democrats chose to field a quintessential insider. Her campaign dwelt little on policies, focusing overwhelmingly on the personality of her opponent. That this strategy was a failure is an understatement. Losing an election to someone with as little competence or support from his own party as Donald Trump marked an extraordinary fiasco. The refusal of the Democratic leadership to identify the real reasons for their defeat is not just a problem of history. If Democrats persevere with a politics that prioritizes well-off professionals rather than ordinary Americans, they will leave the field open to right wing populism for many years to come. Drawing on the WikiLeaks releases of Clinton’s talks at Goldman Sachs and the e mails of her campaign chief John Podesta, as well as key passages from her public speeches, How I Lost By Hillary Clinton also includes extensive commentary by award-winning journalist Joe Lauria, and a foreword by Julian Assange, editor-in-chief of WikiLeaks. It provides, in the words of the Democratic candidate and her close associates, a riveting, unsparing picture of the disastrous campaign that delivered America to President Trump, and a stark warning of a mistake that must not be repeated.

Data Politics

Worlds, Subjects, Rights

Author: Didier Bigo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 294

View: 892

Didier Bigo is Professor of War Studies at King’s College London and Research Professor at Sciences-Po, CERI Paris. He is editor of the quarterly journal, Cultures & Conflicts, and was the founder and co-editor of International Political Sociology, published by International Studies Association. His work concerns sociology of surveillance, policing, and borders. He co-edited Transversal Lines (with Tugba Basaran, Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet and R. B. J. Walker, 2016) as part of the Routledge Studies in International Political Sociology. Engin Isin is Professor in International Politics at Queen Mary University of London and University of London Institute in Paris (ULIP). Isin’s work concerns politics of the changing figure of the citizen as a political subject. He has authored Cities Without Citizens (1992), Citizenship and Identity (with Patricia Wood, 1999), Being Political (2002), Citizens Without Frontiers (2012), and Being Digital Citizens (with Evelyn Ruppert, 2015). He has edited Acts of Citizenship (2008) with Greg Nielsen, Enacting European Citizenship (2013) with Michael Saward, and Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies (2014) with Peter Nyers. His latest book is Citizenship after Orientalism: Transforming Political Theory (2015). Evelyn Ruppert is Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. She studies how digital technologies and the data they generate can powerfully shape and have consequences for how people are known and governed and how they understand themselves as political subjects, that is, citizens with rights to data. Evelyn is PI of an ERC funded project, Peopling Europe: How data make a people (ARITHMUS; 2014–19). She is Founding and Editor-in-Chief of the SAGE open access journal, Big Data & Society. Recent books are Being Digital Citizens (with Engin Isin, 2015) and Modes of Knowing (with John Law, 2016).

Controversial Matters on Media Ethics

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 343

In this volume, several communication researchers deal with different moral controversial issues. Communication and ethics are two faces of the same coin, because communication is just the ability of the human being to respect the equal condition of others to their right to be informed of social matters. Only when they have had right information about the public interest they can participate in their community as citizens. In this book we collected different significant contributions on communication and the main current questions of moral dilemmas.

Inside WikiLeaks

My Time with Julian Assange at the World's Most Dangerous Website

Author: Daniel Domscheit-Berg

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 624

Since its launch in 2006, WikiLeaks has rapidly grown into the most powerful and influential whistleblowing organisation ever. Its status as a repository and publisher of leaked sensitive and confidential governmental, corporate, organisational or religious documents while preserving the anonymity and untraceability of its contributors, and the statements and behaviour of its leader Julian Assange have made WikiLeaks both daily front page news and a topic of enormous controversy. In an eye-opening account, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, who joined WikiLeaks in its early days and became its spokesman, reveals never-disclosed details about the inner workings of the organisation that has struck fear into governments and businesses worldwide and prompted the Pentagon to convene a 120-man investigative task force. He also provides a remarkably up-close portrait of Julian Assange himself. Under the pseudonym Daniel Schmitt, Domscheit-Berg was the effective No. 2 at WikiLeaks and its most public face after Assange. In this book, he tells the backstories of leaks ranging from the Church of Scientology and the Afghanistan and Iraq War logs to Cablegate, and reveals the evolution, finances and inner tensions of the whistleblower organisation, beginning with his first meeting with Assange in December 2007. He also describes what led to his September 2010 withdrawal from WikiLeaks, including his disenchantment with its lack of transparency, its abandonment of political neutrality, and Assange's increasing concentration of power. What has been made public so far about WikiLeaks is only a small fraction of the truth. With his insider knowledge, Domscheit-Berg is uniquely able to tell the full story.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Cablegate Files of Wikileaks

Author: Arthur Conan Doyle

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Detective and mystery stories, English

Page: 340

View: 864

This book is a mixture of Sherlock Holmes and Wikileaks files, become a detective youself. Read the adventures of world famous detective Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and discover 23 highly interesting files from the Wikileaks collection of cables. Read the cables and become a detective by and reveal the contradictions between the US's public persona and what it says behind closed doors. This book is also the first of a series of books published by artist Michael Marcovici, a completely new type of "remixed books" that will feature documents, literature, comics as well as official documents.

Cypherpunks

Freedom and the Future of the Internet

Author: Julian Assange

Publisher: OR Books

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 196

View: 493

The harassment of WikiLeaks and other Internet activists, together with attempts to introduce anti-file sharing legislation such as SOPA and ACTA, indicate that the politics of the Internet have reached a crossroads. In one direction lies a future that guarantees, in the watchwords of the cypherpunks, “privacy for the weak and transparency for the powerful”; in the other lies an Internet that allows government and large corporations to discover ever more about internet users while hiding their own activities. Assange and his co-discussants unpick the complex issues surrounding this crucial choice with clarity and engaging enthusiasm.

Wikileaks and the Age of Transparency

Author: Micah L. Sifry

Publisher: OR Books

ISBN:

Category: Transparency in government

Page: 211

View: 904

WikiLeaks' release of a massive trove of secret official documents has riled politicians from across the spectrum, welcoming in the Age of Transparency. But political analyst and writer Micah Sifry argues that WikiLeaks is not the whole story: it is a symptom, an indicator of an ongoing generational and philosophical struggle between older, closed systems, and the new open culture of the Internet. Sifry, who has worked with and knows Julian Assange, cogently explores the implications of WikiLeaks' ascendancy.