What is Mathematics?

An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods

Author: Richard Courant

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 566

View: 619

A discussion of fundamental mathematical principles from algebra to elementary calculus designed to promote constructive mathematical reasoning.

What is Mathematics?

An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods

Author: Richard Courant

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 521

View: 782

Computable Foundations for Economics

Author: K. Vela Velupillai

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 512

View: 750

Computable Foundations for Economics is a unified collection of essays, some of which are published here for the first time and all of which have been updated for this book, on an approach to economic theory from the point of view of algorithmic mathematics. By algorithmic mathematics the author means computability theory and constructive mathematics. This is in contrast to orthodox mathematical economics and game theory, which are formalised with the mathematics of real analysis, underpinned by what is called the ZFC formalism, i.e., set theory with the axiom of choice. This reliance on ordinary real analysis and the ZFC system makes economic theory in its current mathematical mode completely non-algorithmic, which means it is numerically meaningless. The book provides a systematic attempt to dissect and expose the non-algorithmic content of orthodox mathematical economics and game theory and suggests a reformalization on the basis of a strictly rigorous algorithmic mathematics. This removes the current schizophrenia in mathematical economics and game theory, where theory is entirely divorced from algorithmic applicability – for experimental and computational exercises. The chapters demonstrate the uncomputability and non-constructivity of core areas of general equilibrium theory, game theory and recursive macroeconomics. The book also provides a fresh look at the kind of behavioural economics that lies behind Herbert Simon’s work, and resurrects a role for the noble classical traditions of induction and verification, viewed and formalised, now, algorithmically. It will therefore be of particular interest to postgraduate students and researchers in algorithmic economics, game theory and classical behavioural economics.

Language and Mathematics

An Interdisciplinary Guide

Author: Marcel Danesi

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 344

View: 110

This book explores the many disciplinary and theoretical links between language, linguistics, and mathematics. It examines trends in linguistics, such as structuralism, conceptual metaphor theory, and other relevant theories,to show that language and mathematics have a similar structure, but differential functions, even though one without the other would not exist.

Meaning in Mathematics

Author: John Polkinghorne

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 159

View: 570

Is mathematics invented or discovered? Why does this seemingly abstract discipline provide the key to unlocking the deep secrets of the physical universe? Famous mathematicians, mathematical physicists and philosophers of mathematics try to answer these questions in a series of accessible chapters that shed light on what mathematics really means.

Perfect Rigor

A Genius and the Mathematical Breakthrough of the Century

Author: Masha Gessen

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 230

A gripping and tragic tale that sheds rare light on the unique burden of genius In 2006, an eccentric Russian mathematician named Grigori Perelman solved the Poincare Conjecture, an extremely complex topological problem that had eluded the best minds for over a century. A prize of one million dollars was offered to anyone who could unravel it, but Perelman declined the winnings, and in doing so inspired journalist Masha Gessen to tell his story. Drawing on interviews with Perelman’s teachers, classmates, coaches, teammates, and colleagues in Russia and the United States—and informed by her own background as a math whiz raised in Russia—Gessen uncovered a mind of unrivaled computational power, one that enabled Perelman to pursue mathematical concepts to their logical (sometimes distant) end. But she also discovered that this very strength turned out to be Perelman's undoing and the reason for his withdrawal, first from the world of mathematics and then, increasingly, from the world in general.

Elliptic Tales

Curves, Counting, and Number Theory

Author: Avner Ash

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 280

View: 487

Elliptic Tales describes the latest developments in number theory by looking at one of the most exciting unsolved problems in contemporary mathematics—the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture. In this book, Avner Ash and Robert Gross guide readers through the mathematics they need to understand this captivating problem. The key to the conjecture lies in elliptic curves, which may appear simple, but arise from some very deep—and often very mystifying—mathematical ideas. Using only basic algebra and calculus while presenting numerous eye-opening examples, Ash and Gross make these ideas accessible to general readers, and, in the process, venture to the very frontiers of modern mathematics.

Pythagoras

Pioneering Mathematician and Musical Theorist of Ancient Greece

Author: Dimitra Karamanides

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 890

Biography of the Greek philosopher Pythagoras and his lasting contributions on the fields of mathematics and philosophy.

The Oxford Handbook of Culture and Psychology

Author: Jaan Valsiner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 1136

View: 413

The goal of cultural psychology is to explain the ways in which human cultural constructions -- for example, rituals, stereotypes, and meanings -- organize and direct human acting, feeling, and thinking in different social contexts. A rapidly growing, international field of scholarship, cultural psychology is ready for an interdisciplinary, primary resource. Linking psychology, anthropology, sociology, archaeology, and history, The Oxford Handbook of Culture and Psychology is the quintessential volume that unites the variable perspectives from these disciplines. Comprised of over fifty contributed chapters, this book provides a necessary, comprehensive overview of contemporary cultural psychology. Bridging psychological, sociological, and anthropological perspectives, one will find in this handbook: - A concise history of psychology that includes valuable resources for innovation in psychology in general and cultural psychology in particular - Interdisciplinary chapters including insights into cultural anthropology, cross-cultural psychology, culture and conceptions of the self, and semiotics and cultural connections - Close, conceptual links with contemporary biological sciences, especially developmental biology, and with other social sciences - A section detailing potential methodological innovations for cultural psychology By comparing cultures and the (often differing) human psychological functions occuring within them, The Oxford Handbook of Culture and Psychology is the ideal resource for making sense of complex and varied human phenomena.

From Calculus to Chaos

An Introduction to Dynamics

Author: David Acheson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 269

View: 735

What is calculus really for? This book is a highly readable introduction to applications of calculus, from Newton's time to the present day. These often involve questions of dynamics, i.e. of how - and why - things change with time. Problems of this kind lie at the heart of much of appliedmathematics, physics, and engineering. From Calculus to Chaos takes a fresh approach to the subject as a whole, by moving from first steps to the frontiers, and by highlighting only the most important and interesting ideas, which can get lost amid a snowstorm of detail in conventional texts. Thebook is aimed at a wide readership, and assumes only some knowledge of elementary calculus. There are exercises (with full solutions) and simple but powerful computer programs which are suitable even for readers with no previous computing experience. David Acheson's book will inspire new studentsby providing a foretaste of more advanced mathematics and showing just how interesting the subject can be.