War at Sea in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Author: Ernest J King Professor of Maritime History Chairman Maritime History Department and Director Naval War College Museum John B Hattendorf,John B. Hattendorf,Richard W. Unger

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 9780851159034

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 7608

The role and characteristics of armed force at sea in western Europe and the Mediterranean prior to 1650.

Shipping, Trade and Crusade in the Medieval Mediterranean

Studies in Honour of John Pryor

Author: Dr Ruthy Gertwagen,Professor Elizabeth Jeffreys

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409483126

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 7657

The cutting-edge papers in this collection reflect the wide areas to which John Pryor has made significant contributions in the course of his scholarly career. They are written by some of the world's most distinguished practitioners in the fields of Crusading history and the maritime history of the medieval Mediterranean. His colleagues, students and friends discuss questions including ship construction in the fourth and fifteenth centuries, navigation and harbourage in the eastern Mediterranean, trade in Fatimid Egypt and along the Iberian Peninsula, military and social issues arising among the crusaders during field campaigns, and wider aspects of medieval warfare. All those with an interest in any of these subjects, whether students or specialists, will need to consult this book.

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World

Author: Lincoln Paine

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307962253

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 9562

A monumental retelling of world history through the lens of maritime enterprise, revealing in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, lake and stream, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world’s waterways, bringing together civilizations and defining what makes us most human. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors’ first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India and Southeast and East Asia, who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish thriving overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European expansion. And finally, his narrative traces how commercial shipping and naval warfare brought about the enormous demographic, cultural, and political changes that have globalized the world throughout the post–Cold War era. This tremendously readable intellectual adventure shows us the world in a new light, in which the sea reigns supreme. We find out how a once-enslaved East African king brought Islam to his people, what the American “sail-around territories” were, and what the Song Dynasty did with twenty-wheel, human-powered paddleboats with twenty paddle wheels and up to three hundred crew. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be linked to the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history.

Alfred's Wars

Sources and Interpretations of Anglo-Saxon Warfare in the Viking Age

Author: Ryan Lavelle

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 1843837390

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 4014

Collection of source material and crucial interpretations, offering a comprehensive guide to Anglo-Saxon warfare.

War in the Middle Ages

Author: Philippe Contamine

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

ISBN: 9780631144694

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 517

A history of medieval warfare in Europe covers the fifth through the fifteenth century and discusses armor, artillery, strategy, and courage

Empires of the Sea

The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the Center of the World

Author: Roger Crowley

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812977645

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 5831

A thrilling account of the brutal decades-long battle between Christendom and Islam for the soul of Europe. This struggle's brutal climax came between 1565 and 1571, seven years that witnessed a fight to the finish decided in a series of bloody set pieces: the epic siege of Malta, in which a tiny band of Christian defenders defied the might of the Ottoman army; the savage battle for Cyprus; and the apocalyptic last-ditch defense of southern Europe at Lepanto--one of the single most shocking days in world history. At the close of this cataclysmic naval encounter, the carnage was so great that the victors could barely sail away because of the countless corpses floating in the sea. Lepanto fixed the frontiers of the Mediterranean world that we know today.

War In The Early Modern World

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135361568

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 3562

A collection of essays charting the developments in military practice and warfare across the world in the early modern and modern periods.

Neptune and the Netherlands

State, Economy, and War at Sea in the Renaissance

Author: L H J Sicking

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004138501

Category: Law

Page: 551

View: 3383

This book, mainly based on primary sources from various countries, provides fascinating new insights into the origin and development of the Admiralty and maritime policy in the Low Countries before the Dutch Revolt, including government interference with maritime strategy, warfare, privateering, prize law, commerce, and fishery.

Classical Myths and Legends in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

A Dictionary of Allegorical Meanings

Author: H. David Brumble

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136797386

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 8340

While numerous classical dictionaries identify the figures and tales of Greek and Roman mythology, this reference book explains the allegorical significance attached to the myths by Medieval and Renaissance authors. Included are several hundred alphabetically arranged entries for the gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and places of classical myth and legend. Each entry includes a brief account of the myth, with reference to the Greek and Latin sources. The entry then discusses how Medieval and Renaissance commentators interpreted the myth, and how poets, dramatists, and artists employed the allegory in their art. Each entry includes a bibliography and the volume concludes with appendices and an extensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources.

Geography, Technology, and War

Studies in the Maritime History of the Mediterranean, 649-1571

Author: John H. Pryor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521428927

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 8919

A study of the technological limitations of maritime traffic in the Mediterranean, seen in conjunction with the geographical conditions within which it operated.

The Edge of the World

How the North Sea Made Us Who We Are

Author: Michael Pye

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN: 9780241963838

Category: Europe

Page: 400

View: 1347

When the Romans retreated from northern Europe, they left behind lands of barbarians at the very edge of the known world. Yet a thousand years later the countries surrounding the North Sea were at the heart of scientific, mercantile and artistic enlightenments and controlled the first truly global empires. In The Edge of the World, Michael Pye explains how a small but treacherous body of water inspired the saints, spies, fisherman, pirates, traders and marauders who lived beside and journeyed across the North Sea to give birth to our modern world. Hugely enjoyable.' Tom Holland, Guardian 'Pye is a wonderful historian.' Terry Jones 'Astonishing. A treasure chest.' The Times 'A dazzling historical adventure.' Daily Telegraph 'Extraordinary . . . fascinating.' Observer

The Portable Chaucer

Revised Edition

Author: Geoffrey Chaucer

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101127414

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 624

View: 3707

In the fourteenth century Geoffrey Chaucer, who served three kings as a customs official and special envoy, virtually invented English poetry. He did so by wedding the language of common speech to metrical verse, creating a medium that could accommodate tales of courtly romance, bawdy fabliaux, astute psychological portraiture, dramatic monologues, moral allegories, and its author’s astonishing learning in fields from philosophy to medicine and astrology. Chaucer’s accomplishment is unequalled by any poet before Shakespeare and—in The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Cressida—ranks with that of the great English novelists. Both The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Cressida are presented complete in this anthology, in fresh modern translations by Theodore Morrison that convey both the gravity and gaiety of the Middle English originals. The Portable Chaucer also contains selections from The Book of Duchess, The House of Fame, The Bird's Parliament, and The Legend of Good Women, together with short poems. Morrison's introduction is vital for its insights into Chaucer as man and artist, and as a product of the Middle Ages whose shrewdness, humor, and compassion have a wonderfully contemporary ring.

Black Africans in Renaissance Europe

Author: K. J. P. Lowe

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521815826

Category: History

Page: 417

View: 3745

This book, first published in 2005, opens up the much neglected area of the black African presence in Western Europe during the Renaissance. Covering history, literature, art history and anthropology, it investigates a whole range of black African experience and representation across Renaissance Europe, from various types of slavery to black musicians and dancers, from real and symbolic Africans at court to the view of the Catholic Church, and from writers of African descent to black African 'criminality'. The main purpose of the collection is to show the variety and complexity of black African life in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Europe, and how it was affected by firmly held preconceptions relating to the African continent and its inhabitants. Of enormous importance for both European and American history, this book mixes empirical material and theoretical approaches, and addresses such issues as stereotypes, changing black African identity, and cultural representation in art and literature.

The Mapmakers' Quest: Depicting New Worlds in Renaissance Europe

Author: David Buisseret

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191500909

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 8031

In 1400 Europe was behind large parts of the world in its understanding of the use of maps. For instance, the people gf China and of Japan were considerably more advanced in this respect. And yet, by 1600 the Europeans had come to use maps for a huge variety of tasks, and were far ahead of the rest of the world in their appreciation of the power and use of cartography. The Mapmakers' Quest seeks to understand this development - not only to tease out the strands of thought and practice which led to the use of maps, but also to assess the ways in which such use affected European societies and economies. Taking as a starting point the question of why there were so few maps in Europe in 1400 and so many by 1650, the book explores the reasons for this and its implications for European history. It examines, inter al, how mapping and military technology advanced in tandem, how modern states' territories were mapped and borders drawn up, the role of maps in shaping the urban environment, and cartography's links to the new sciences.

Sea of the Caliphs

The Mediterranean in the Medieval Islamic World

Author: Christophe Picard

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674660463

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6587

Christophe Picard recounts the adventures of Muslim sailors who competed with Greek and Latin seamen for control of the 7th-century Mediterranean. By the time Christian powers took over trade routes in the 13th century, a Muslim identity that operated within, and in opposition to, Europe had been shaped by encounters across the sea of the caliphs.

A Distant Mirror

The Calamitous 14th Century

Author: Barbara W. Tuchman

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780307793690

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 6115

Barbara W. Tuchman—the acclaimed author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning classic The Guns of August—once again marshals her gift for character, history, and sparkling prose to compose an astonishing portrait of medieval Europe. The fourteenth century reflects two contradictory images: on the one hand, a glittering age of crusades, cathedrals, and chivalry; on the other, a world plunged into chaos and spiritual agony. In this revelatory work, Barbara W. Tuchman examines not only the great rhythms of history but the grain and texture of domestic life: what childhood was like; what marriage meant; how money, taxes, and war dominated the lives of serf, noble, and clergy alike. Granting her subjects their loyalties, treacheries, and guilty passions, Tuchman re-creates the lives of proud cardinals, university scholars, grocers and clerks, saints and mystics, lawyers and mercenaries, and, dominating all, the knight—in all his valor and “furious follies,” a “terrible worm in an iron cocoon.” Praise for A Distant Mirror “Beautifully written, careful and thorough in its scholarship . . . What Ms. Tuchman does superbly is to tell how it was. . . . No one has ever done this better.”—The New York Review of Books “A beautiful, extraordinary book . . . Tuchman at the top of her powers . . . She has done nothing finer.”—The Wall Street Journal “Wise, witty, and wonderful . . . a great book, in a great historical tradition.”—Commentary NOTE: This edition does not include color images.

Vikings

Author: Magnus Magnusson

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 075098077X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5962

The Vikings hold a particular place in the history of the West, both symbolically and in the significant impact they had on Northern Europe. Magnus Magnusson's indispensable study of this great period presents a rounded and fascinating picture of a people who, in modern eyes, would seem to embody striking contradictions. They were undoubtedly pillagers, raiders and terrifying warriors, but they were also great pioneers, artists and traders—a dynamic people, whose skill and daring in their exploration of the world has left an indelible impression a thousand years on.

The Hundred Years War

England and France at War c.1300–c.1450

Author: Christopher Allmand

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107392861

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 3116

This is a comparative study of how the societies of late-medieval England and France reacted to the long period of conflict between them commonly known as the Hundred Years War. Beginning with an analysis of contemporary views regarding the war. Two chapters follow which describe the military aim of the protagonists, military and naval organisation, recruitment, and the raising of taxes. The remainder of the book describes and analyses some of the main social and economic effects of war upon society, the growth of a sense of national consciousness in time of conflict, and the social criticism which came from those who reacted to changes and development brought about by war. Although intended primarily as a textbook for students, Dr Allmand's study is much more than that. It makes an important general contribution to the history of war in medieval times, and opens up new and original perspectives on a familiar topic.