Walking Raddy

The Baby Dolls of New Orleans

Author: Kim Vaz-Deville

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496817435

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 2022

Contributions by Jennifer Atkins, Vashni Balleste, Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, Ron Bechet, Melanie Bratcher, Jerry Brock, Ann Bruce, Violet Harrington Bryan, Rachel Carrico, Sarah Anita Clunis, Phillip Colwart, Keith Duncan, Rob Florence, Pamela R. Franco, Daniele Gair, Meryt Harding, Megan Holt, DeriAnne Meilleur Honora, Marielle Jeanpierre, Ulrick Jean-Pierre, Jessica Marie Johnson, Karen La Beau, D. Lammie-Hanson, Karen Trahan Leathem, Charles Lovell, Annie Odell, Ruth Owens, Steve Prince, Nathan "Nu'Awlons Natescott" Haynes Scott, LaKisha Michelle Simmons, Tia L. Smith, Gailene McGhee St.Amand, and Kim Vaz-Deville Since 2004, the Baby Doll Mardi Gras tradition in New Orleans has gone from an obscure, almost forgotten practice to a flourishing cultural force. The original Baby Dolls were groups of black women, and some men, in the early Jim Crow era who adopted New Orleans street masking tradition as a unique form of fun and self-expression against a backdrop of racial discrimination. Wearing short dresses, bloomers, bonnets, and garters with money tucked tight, they strutted, sang ribald songs, chanted, and danced on Mardi Gras Day and on St. Joseph feast night. Today's Baby Dolls continue the tradition of one of the first street women's masking and marching groups in the United States. They joyfully and unabashedly defy gender roles, claiming public space and proclaiming through their performance their right to social citizenship. Essayists draw on interviews, theoretical perspectives, archival material, and historical assessments to describe women's cultural performances that take place on the streets of New Orleans. They recount the history and contemporary resurgence of the Baby Dolls while delving into the larger cultural meaning of the phenomenon. Over 140 color photographs and personal narratives of immersive experiences provide passionate testimony of the impact of the Baby Dolls on their audiences. Fifteen artists offer statements regarding their work documenting and inspired by the tradition as it stimulates their imagination to present a practice that revitalizes the spirit.

The "Baby Dolls"

Breaking the Race and Gender Barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras Tradition

Author: Kim Marie Vaz

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807150711

Category: Social Science

Page: 178

View: 5829

One of the first women’s organizations to “mask” in a Mardi Gras parade, the “Million Dollar Baby Dolls” redefined the New Orleans carnival tradition. Tracing their origins from Storyville brothels and dance halls to their re-emergence in post-Katrina New Orleans, author Kim Vaz uncovers the fascinating history of the “raddy-walking, shake-dancing, cigar-smoking, money-flinging” ladies that strutted their way into a predominantly male establishment. The Baby Dolls formed around 1912 as an organization for African American women who used their profits from working in New Orleans’s red-light district to compete with other black women in their profession on Mardi Gras. Part of this competition involved the tradition of masking in which carnival groups create a collective identity through costuming. Their baby doll costumes—short satin dresses, stockings with garters, and bonnets—set against their bold and provocative public behavior not only exploited stereotypes but also empowered and made visible an otherwise marginalized demographic of women. In addition to their subversive presence at Mardi Gras, the Baby Dolls helped shape the sound of jazz in the city. The Baby Dolls often worked in and patronized dance halls and honky-tonks, where they introduced new dance steps and challenged house musicians to keep up the beat. The entrepreneurial Baby Dolls also sponsored dances with live jazz bands, effectively underwriting the advancement of an art form now inseparable from New Orleans’s identity. Over time, the Baby Doll’s members diverged as different neighborhoods adopted the tradition. Groups such as the Golden Slipper Club, the Gold Diggers, the Rosebud Social and Pleasure Club, and the Satin Sinners stirred the creative imagination of middle-class Black women and men across New Orleans, from the downtown Tremé area to the uptown community of Mahalia Jackson. Vaz follows the Baby Doll phenomenon through one hundred years of photos, articles, and interviews to conclude with the birth of contemporary groups such as the modern day Antoinette K-Doe’s Ernie K-Doe Baby Dolls, the New Orleans Society of Dance’s Baby Doll Ladies, and the Tremé Million Dollar Baby Dolls. Her book celebrates these organizations’ crucial contribution to Louisiana’s cultural history.

The 'Baby Dolls'

Breaking the Race and Gender Barriers of the New Orleans Mardi Gras Tradition

Author: Kim Marie Vaz

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 080715072X

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 8944

One of the first women's organizations to mask and perform during Mardi Gras, the Million Dollar Baby Dolls redefined the New Orleans carnival tradition. Tracing their origins from Storyville-era brothels and dance halls to their re-emergence in post-Katrina New Orleans, author Kim Marie Vaz uncovers the fascinating history of the "raddy-walking, shake-dancing, cigar-smoking, money-flinging" ladies who strutted their way into a predominantly male establishment. The Baby Dolls formed around 1912 as an organization of African American women who used their profits from working in New Orleans's red-light district to compete with other Black prostitutes on Mardi Gras. Part of this event involved the tradition of masking, in which carnival groups create a collective identity through costuming. Their baby doll costumes -- short satin dresses, stockings with garters, and bonnets -- set against a bold and provocative public behavior not only exploited stereotypes but also empowered and made visible an otherwise marginalized female demographic. Over time, different neighborhoods adopted the Baby Doll tradition, stirring the creative imagination of Black women and men across New Orleans, from the downtown Trem area to the uptown community of Mahalia Jackson. Vaz follows the Baby Doll phenomenon through one hundred years with photos, articles, and interviews and concludes with the birth of contemporary groups, emphasizing these organizations' crucial contribution to Louisiana's cultural history.

The Golden Crown: A Story of Black New Orleans

Author: Clarence William Jr.

Publisher: Page Publishing Inc

ISBN: 168409755X

Category: Fiction

Page: 250

View: 2919

The Golden Crown: A Story of Black New Orleans, is centered mainly on a working-class New Orleans family. Henderson Brooks, the youngest of three brothers, is a riverfront foreman with a wife and three children. He is also chief of the Downtown Warriors, a Mardi Gras Indian tribe that parades every Mardi Gras Day. His tribe is in competition with at least thirty tribes about the city for splendor and innovation in costume design. His father and grandfather were Downtown Warrior chiefs before him, and his grandfather founded the tribe in 1918. For the Warriors’ fiftieth anniversary he is determined to create a special costume to mark the milestone, one that would be his greatest achievement ever. Yet so many obstacles get in his way that for a time he is doubtful about being able to mask at all. Never in the history of the Downtown Warriors has a chief failed to make his designated appearance. Henderson’s older brother, R.C., has recently returned to the streets after serving six years in the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary for drug offenses. He falls back into the habit as soon as he is released. His middle brother, Chatman, a riverfront executive, has two sons who are also involved with heroin. His oldest, Spence, returns from Vietnam addicted, and finds his younger brother, Mike, using as well. R.C. vows that he will never associate with his nephews in the drug life, but unexpected events force him to do otherwise, with tragic results. Along with the Vietnam War, where black men are dying in combat in numbers far out of proportion to their presence in the American population, the heroin epidemic, running unchecked, is decimating inner-city black communities throughout the country. New Orleans is not spared. Henderson’s Seventh Ward community, known as the Ramp, under the able leadership of its parent organization, the Bamboula Club, is fighting back, and by any means necessary. They have dedicated the 1968 Mardi Gras Indian ritual to the complete eradication of the heroin menace from their community. This leaves Henderson with a confused understanding of his responsibilities in dealing with the crisis, as three of the main players are his brother and nephews. Yet by the time he completes his costume he has grown in ways he couldn’t have imagined and is able to meet all challenges when his priorities and allegiances are tested. The story is told through colorful characters and deals candidly with the racial realities of New Orleans and its history. It highlights not only the Mardi Gras Indian culture but other elements of the complex black New Orleans culture as well.

New Orleans Carnival Krewes

The History, Spirit & Secrets of Mardi Gras

Author: Rosary O'Neill

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1625846096

Category: Photography

Page: 240

View: 6247

New Orleans is practically synonymous with Mardi Gras. Both evoke the parades, the beads, the costumes, the food--the pomp and circumstance. The carnival krewes are the backbone of this Big Easy tradition. Every year, different krewes put on extravagant parties and celebrations to commemorate the beginning of the Lenten season. Historic krewes like Comus, Rex and Zulu that date back generations are intertwined with the greater history of New Orleans itself. Today, new krewes are inaugurated and widen a once exclusive part of New Orleans society. Through careful and detailed research of over three hundred sources, including fifty interviews with members of these organizations, author and New Orleans native Rosary O'Neill explores this storied institution, its antebellum roots and its effects in the twenty-first century.

Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha

Author: Roddy Doyle

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440673726

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 6568

Winner of the Booker Prize – Roddy Doyle’s witty, exuberant novel about a young boy trying to make sense of his changing world Look for Roddy Doyle’s new novel, Smile, coming in October of 2017 It is 1968. Patrick Clarke is ten. He loves Geronimo, the Three Stooges, and the smell of his hot water bottle. He can't stand his little brother Sinbad. His best friend is Kevin, and their names are all over Barrytown, written with sticks in wet cement. They play football, lepers, and jumping to the bottom of the sea. But why didn't anyone help him when Charles Leavy had been going to kill him? Why do his ma and da argue so much, but act like everything is fine? Paddy sees everything, but he understands less and less. Hilarious and poignant, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha charts the triumphs, indignities, and bewilderment of a young boy and his world, a place full of warmth, cruelty, confusion and love.

The Woman with the Artistic Brush: Life History of Yoruba Batik Nike Olaniyi Davies

Life History of Yoruba Batik Nike Olaniyi Davies

Author: Kim Marie Vaz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317453921

Category: Political Science

Page: 152

View: 9195

Nike Davies is one of the few African women known internationally in contemporary art circles. The Woman with the Artistic Brush traces her life history and illustrates the strategies developed by women to mitigate male rule. Presenting a critique of the woman's place in contemporary Yoruba society from the perspective of a woman who lived it, this book covers Nike's life from the time of her mother's death when Nike was six to the culmination of her dream in the creation, against severe societal odds, of a center for arts and culture that has over 120 members. Along the way, The Woman with the Artistic Brush details how Nike ran away from home and joined a traveling theater group after her father tried to arrange her marriage, subsequently married and joined in the polygynous household of a noted artist from the popular Osogbo school, and finally broke clear of that situation after suffering sixteen years of domestic violence. The Woman with the Artistic Brush is another superb contribution to the Foremother Legacies series.

Caribbean Quarterly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Caribbean Area

Page: N.A

View: 7613

Lords of misrule

Mardi Gras and the politics of race in New Orleans

Author: James Gill

Publisher: Univ Pr of Mississippi

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 6936

Discusses how Mardi Gras is run by elitist secret societies, its effects, and attempts to change it

The Secret Heiress

Author: Bethany Campbell

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN: 1426825498

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 9675

Marie Lafayette has struggled for most of her life. So when her mother's dying confession reveals an astonishing truth, Marie walks away from her career to find answers at Fairchild Acres…where she might be the heiress to the Fairchild family fortune! But Marie can't bring herself to reveal her true identity. Her? An heiress? And to make matters worse, she's falling for racing world royalty. Andrew Preston is wealthy, handsome…and completely wrong for her. Because even as Andrew makes Marie feel like Cinderella, she knows fairy tales don't exist. And men like Andrew don't fall for women like her.…

The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case

Race, Law, and Justice in the Reconstruction Era

Author: Michael Anthony Ross

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199778809

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 4144

Recounts a famous kidnapping that took place in New Orleans in 1870, in which a seventeen-month-old white child was taken by two African-American women, and the resulting public hysteria that led to racial tensions, political divisions, and false accusations and arrests.

Ulysses

Author: James Joyce

Publisher: First Avenue Editions

ISBN: 1512406562

Category: Fiction

Page: 854

View: 351

An extraordinary look at an ordinary dayJune 16, 1904in the life of a middle-aged Jewish man living in Dublin, Ireland. Leopold Bloom, who is sure that his wife is being unfaithful, must come to terms with how that affects their marriage and whether it changes the nature of their love for one another. Richly detailed stream-of-consciousness narration immerses the reader in the thoughts and emotions of the characters as they deal with the normal events of daily life in Dublin, as well as grander issues like sexuality, prejudice, birth, and death. This is an unabridged version of Irish author James Joyce's groundbreaking modernist tale, which parallels Homer's Odyssey. It was first published serially in the American journal The Little Review between 1918 and 1921, and published in novel form in 1922 in Paris.

The Hanging of Angélique

The Untold Story of Canadian Slavery and the Burning of Old Montréal

Author: Afua Cooper

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820329401

Category: Social Science

Page: 349

View: 9752

New light is shed on the largely misunderstood or ignored history of slavery in Canada through this portrait of slave Marie-Joseph Angelique, who in 1734 was arrested, tried, convicted, and executed for starting a fire that destroyed more than forty Montreal buildings. Simultaneous.

Slavery's Metropolis

Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions

Author: Rashauna Johnson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107133718

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5258

A vivid examination of slave life in New Orleans in the early nineteenth century.

Urban Theory

New critical perspectives

Author: Mark Jayne,Kevin Ward

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317644476

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 9605

Urban Theory: New Critical Perspectives provides an introduction to innovative critical contributions to the field of urban studies. Chapters offer easily accessible and digestible reviews, and as a reference text Urban Theory is a comprehensive and integrated primer which covers topics necessary for a full understanding of recent theoretical engagements with cities. The introduction outlines the development of urban theory over the past two hundred years and discusses significant theoretical, methodological and empirical challenges facing the field of urban studies in the context of an increasing globally inter-connected world. The chapters explore twenty-four topics, which are new additions to the urban theoretical debate, highlighting their relationship to long established concerns that continue to have intellectual purchase, and which also engage with rich new and emerging avenues for debate. Each chapter considers the genealogy of the topic at hand and also includes case studies which explain key terms or provide empirical examples to guide the reader to a better understanding of how theory adds to our understanding of the complexities of urban life. This book offers a critical and assessable introduction to original and groundbreaking urban theory and will be essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate students in human geography, sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, economics, planning, political science and urban studies.

Slavery and the Culture of Taste

Author: Simon Gikandi

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400840112

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 392

View: 1760

It would be easy to assume that, in the eighteenth century, slavery and the culture of taste--the world of politeness, manners, and aesthetics--existed as separate and unequal domains, unrelated in the spheres of social life. But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined. Ranging across Britain, the antebellum South, and the West Indies, and examining vast archives, including portraits, period paintings, personal narratives, and diaries, Simon Gikandi illustrates how the violence and ugliness of enslavement actually shaped theories of taste, notions of beauty, and practices of high culture, and how slavery's impurity informed and haunted the rarified customs of the time. Gikandi focuses on the ways that the enslavement of Africans and the profits derived from this exploitation enabled the moment of taste in European--mainly British--life, leading to a transformation of bourgeois ideas regarding freedom and selfhood. He explores how these connections played out in the immense fortunes made in the West Indies sugar colonies, supporting the lavish lives of English barons and altering the ideals that defined middle-class subjects. Discussing how the ownership of slaves turned the American planter class into a new aristocracy, Gikandi engages with the slaves' own response to the strange interplay of modern notions of freedom and the realities of bondage, and he emphasizes the aesthetic and cultural processes developed by slaves to create spaces of freedom outside the regimen of enforced labor and truncated leisure. Through a close look at the eighteenth century's many remarkable documents and artworks, Slavery and the Culture of Taste sets forth the tensions and contradictions entangling a brutal practice and the distinctions of civility.

Slavery by Any Other Name

African Life Under Company Rule in Colonial Mozambique

Author: Eric Allina

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813932726

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 255

View: 2101

Based on documents from a long-lost and unexplored colonial archive, Slavery by Any Other Name tells the story of how Portugal privatized part of its empire to the Mozambique Company. In the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the company governed central Mozambique under a royal charter and built a vast forced labor regime camouflaged by the rhetoric of the civilizing mission. Oral testimonies from more than one hundred Mozambican elders provide a vital counterpoint to the perspectives of colonial officials detailed in the archival records of the Mozambique Company. Putting elders' voices into dialogue with officials' reports, Eric Allina reconstructs this modern form of slavery, explains the impact this coercive labor system had on Africans’ lives, and describes strategies they used to mitigate or deflect its burdens. In analyzing Africans’ responses to colonial oppression, Allina documents how some Africans succeeded in recovering degrees of sovereignty, not through resistance, but by placing increasing burdens on fellow Africans—a dynamic that paralleled developments throughout much of the continent. This volume also traces the international debate on slavery, labor, and colonialism that ebbed and flowed during the first several decades of the twentieth century, exploring a conversation that extended from the backwoods of the Mozambique-Zimbabwe borderlands to ministerial offices in Lisbon and London. Slavery by Any Other Name situates this history of forced labor in colonial Africa within the broader and deeper history of empire, slavery, and abolition, showing how colonial rule in Africa simultaneously continued and transformed past forms of bondage.

The Captive's Quest for Freedom

Fugitive Slaves, the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and the Politics of Slavery

Author: R. J. M. Blackett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108311105

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4272

This magisterial study, ten years in the making by one of the field's most distinguished historians, will be the first to explore the impact fugitive slaves had on the politics of the critical decade leading up to the Civil War. Through the close reading of diverse sources ranging from government documents to personal accounts, Richard J. M. Blackett traces the decisions of slaves to escape, the actions of those who assisted them, the many ways black communities responded to the capture of fugitive slaves, and how local laws either buttressed or undermined enforcement of the federal law. Every effort to enforce the law in northern communities produced levels of subversion that generated national debate so much so that, on the eve of secession, many in the South, looking back on the decade, could argue that the law had been effectively subverted by those individuals and states who assisted fleeing slaves.

The Ballroom on Magnolia Street

Author: Sharon Owens

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141921226

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 6335

Shirley Winters is a daydreamer in loves vintage clothes and 80's music. She is also in love with with gorgeous Declan Greenwood and can't believe her luck when her crush is rewarded with a swift marriage proposal. Older sister Kate, who enjoys collecting handbags and lovers with equal relish, is less than pleased with this news. There is no chance she is playing bridesmaid to Shirley's bride, so the rush is on to find a husband of her own. Handsome Johnny Hogan owns the ballroom on Magnolia Street, and still pines for Marion, the woman he loved and lost many years ago. And when he finds out that Declan is the son Marion had by him, he insists on playing a major part in the wedding. But little does he realize that Kate intends making it Belfast's double wedding of the year ...

Electrical Engineering 101

Everything You Should Have Learned in School...but Probably Didn't

Author: Darren Ashby

Publisher: Newnes

ISBN: 9780080949499

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 320

View: 7092

Written by an expert electronics engineer who enjoys teaching the practical side of engineering, this book covers all the subjects that a beginning EE needs to know: intuitive circuit and signal analysis, physical equivalents of electrical components, proper use of an oscilloscope, troubleshooting both digital and analog circuits, and much more! Even engineers with years in the industry can benefit from the compendium of practical information provided within. CONTENTS: Chapter 0: What is Electricity Really? Chapter 1: Three Things They Should Have Taught in Engineering 101 Chapter 2: Basic Theory Chapter 3: Pieces Parts Chapter 4: The Real World Chapter 5: Tools Chapter 6: Troubleshooting Chapter 7: Touchy-Feely Stuff Appendix *Covers the engineering basics that have been either left out of a typical engineer's education or forgotten over time *No other book offers a wealth of "insider information" in one volume, specifically geared to help new engineers and provide a refresher for those with more experience *updated content throughout, including 2-color diagrams and a new 'Chapter 0 - What is Electricity Really?' *The accompanying CD-ROM contains a reference library of electronics information, with demo simulation software and engineering calculators