Walking on Tenerife

Author: Paddy Dillon

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 743

This guidebook to 45 day walks and treks on Tenerife in the Canary islands explores the coast and mountains of Tenerife with walks ranging between 4 and 32km, with short, easy strolls suitable for walkers of all abilities, to long and challenging routes. Detailed route descriptions are illustrated with the author's own clear contour mapping and colour photographs. This guide is one of a five-part series of guides to the walking on the Canary Islands. Tenerife, as a popular winter sun destination, provides a fascinating and varied landscape for walkers to explore, including the Tenerife section of the long-distance GR131 which links all the Canaries. The guide is split into seven sections - Anaga, Teno, Arona/Guía, Valle de la Orotava, Parque Nacional and El Teide - covering all the best walking to be had on the island, including the rugged 'Three Peaks of Tenerife' route, climbing Guajara, Pico Viejo and finally El Teide. Walks also explore the Parque Nacional del Teide, Las Cañadas, Corona Forestal, Teno and an ascent of El Teide itself, Spain's highest mountain. Alongside the 45 routes in this guide, are essential practical details on travel to and around Tenerife, as well as advice on accommodation and preparation, as well as information on the history, geology and culture of the largest of the Canary Islands.

Tenerife

The finest walks on the coast and in the mountains. 80 walks. With GPS tracks

Author: Klaus Wolfsperger

Publisher: Bergverlag Rother GmbH

ISBN:

Category: Tenerife (Canary Islands)

Page: 272

View: 208

Tenerife can easily be described as the most versatile hiking paradise of the Canary Islands. The “Island of Bliss” not only offers the highest peak of the Canary archipelago and the whole of Spain - the Pico de Teide measuring 3718m – it also unites countless, completely different types of landscape: the extremely bare, almost desert-like south, holiday destination of sun aficionados, is in strict contrast to the picture landscape of the fertile north with its sumptuous nature. The mountain regions are covered in evergreen laurel and heathered forests as well as extensive woods of pine tree. A scenic highlight is bound to be the moon landscape of the Cañadas del Teide National Park. As a result, Tenerife is not only a refuge for central Europeans who shy away from winter, but mainly an ideal island for hiking. With the wide ocean at all times in sight, the range of the 80 hiking tours presented in this guide includes easy paths over rough cliffs and picturesque trips to heights as well as ascents to peaks that offer a fabulous view – hiking paths through fairytale-like nebulous primeval forests are also included, such as the partially paved Caminos, which in the early days where the main connecting routes between villages. Many tour suggestions in this hiking guide are suitable for less experienced hikers. Skilled mountaineers who do not fear “tours of the drastic kind” and who are in for a touch of adventure and a bit of a kick will also find a rich offering: daring cliff tours, spectacular ravine excursions and extensive mountain trips whose highlight must be the parade summit of the National Park. Atmospheric pictures and excellent hiking maps at an ideal scale of 1:50,000/1:75,000 and informative height profiles round off the picture and ignite curiosity for ever new tours into this bizarre and charming world of mountains. An overall successful guide brought up to date, which leaves nothing to desire!

Walking on the West Pennine Moors

30 routes in gritstone country

Author: Terry Marsh

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 176

View: 546

Guidebook to 30 day walks in the West Pennine Moors, the wide open country between Blackburn, Darwen, Chorley and Bolton in the heart of northern England. Walks from short, easy rambles to challenging hikes, with lots of information on local history and geology explained along the way. The West Pennine Moors cover over 80 square miles of wild and diverse landscape. The area is rich in historical heritage, including historic houses, monuments such as Holcombe Tower and Jubilee Tower, and other reminders of the industrial revolution. The walks are described step-by-step clearly illustrated with OS map extracts and colour photographs.

Lake District: Low Level and Lake Walks

Author: Vivienne Crow

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 192

View: 535

This guidebook describes 30 low-level day walks in the valleys, beside the lakes and on the low fells of the Lake District, suitable for walkers of all abilities. Each route is illustrated with OS map extracts, and range from 7 to 17km in length, with no technical difficulties over terrain from wide constructed trails to narrow paths on open fell. Walkers who know the Lakes well may have missed some of the lower gems covered here from delightful wooded glades and sparkling tarns hidden in green folds on the hillside to tumultuous waterfalls and glacier-carved valleys towered over by craggy mountains, this guidebook aims to seek out the best lower level walks the Lake District have to offer. Located across the whole of the Lake District, the walks are divided into five sections: South Lakes (Windermere, Coniston, Duddon and the south), Central Lakes (Ambleside, Langdale, Grasmere and Thirlmere), Western Valleys (Eskdale, Wasdale and the Buttermere area), North Lakes (Keswick, Borrowdale and Derwentwater) and Eastern Lakes (Ullswater and Patterdale).

The Wye Valley Walk

Author: The Wye Valley Walk Partnership

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 176

View: 665

Official guidebook to the Wye Valley Walk. Following the River Wye for 136 miles from the mouth of the river at Chepstow to the slopes of Plynlimon in Powys, the Wye Valley offers a perfect mix of river and hill walking. Devised by the Wye Valley Walk Partnership, the walk takes up to two weeks to complete, and enjoys the superb scenery of the Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Illustrated with colour photographs and OS map extracts, and also includes a Wye Valley Walk passport, for walkers to collect stamps along the route for a permanent record of their journey. The Way offers a perfect mix of river and hill walking as it follows the River Wye. The walk leads through a dramatic limestone gorge, dense woodland beneath limestone crags and past peaceful river meadows in some of the most superb scenery in the heart of the Wye Valley.

The Irish Coast to Coast Walk

Dublin to Bray Head

Author: Paddy Dillon

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 213

The Coast to Coast route through Ireland, from Dublin to the Atlantic coast, passes through glorious mountain and river country, and offers an opportunity to discover the heart of the Emerald Isle. The walk links several waymarked routes - the Wicklow Way, South Leinster Way, East Munster Way, Blackwater Way and the Kerry Way. Whether you intend to split this route into sections and enjoy the walk over a period of time, or walk it in one go, the alternative high-level routes along the way enable you to make the adventure as challenging as you like. The guide includes: the 387-mile route broken down into 24 day stages; a description of alternative high-level routes; a comprehensive introduction to walking a long-distance route in Ireland; and information on accommodation along the way.

The John Muir Trail

Through the Californian Sierra Nevada

Author: Alan Castle

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 224

View: 474

The John Muir Trail (JMT) is a world-famous trek and North America's best known walking trail. It runs for 216 miles through California's high Sierra Nevada mountains, from Yosemite Valley (El Capitan and Half-Dome) to the summit of Mount Whitney (14,496ft), the highest peak in the US outside Alaska. All you need to know to plan and prepare for your trip is contained within this guide, from obtaining trekking permits to buying trek food and forwarding food caches along the trail. Abundant advice is given on such topics as dealing with inquisitive bears, coping with altitude, negotiating river crossings, as well as tips on booking transport to and from the trailheads and on what equipment to take. In addition there is a detailed description of the flora and fauna of this remarkable region. The walking trail, which is named after the great 19th-century Scottish naturalist, conservationist and writer John Muir, is entirely through the unspoilt wilderness of the American West and passes through three national parks: Yosemite, Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks.

Unjustifiable Risk?

The Story of British Climbing

Author: Simon Thompson

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 400

View: 898

To the impartial observer Britain does not appear to have any mountains. Yet the British invented the sport of mountain climbing and for two periods in history British climbers led the world in the pursuit of this beautiful and dangerous obsession. Unjustifiable Risk is the story of the social, economic and cultural conditions that gave rise to the sport, and the achievements and motives of the scientists and poets, parsons and anarchists, villains and judges, ascetics and drunks that have shaped its development over the past two hundred years. The history of climbing inevitably reflects the wider changes that have occurred in British society, including class, gender, nationalism and war, but the sport has also contributed to changing social attitudes to nature and beauty, heroism and death. Over the years, increasing wealth, leisure and mobility have gradually transformed climbing from an activity undertaken by an eccentric and privileged minority into a sub-division of the leisure and tourist industry, while competition, improved technology and information, and increasing specialisation have helped to create climbs of unimaginable difficulty at the leading edge of the sport. But while much has changed, even more has remained the same. Today's climbers would be instantly recognisable to their Victorian predecessors, with their desire to escape from the crowded complexity of urban society and willingness to take "unjustifiable" risk in pursuit of beauty, adventure and self-fulfilment. Unjustifiable Risk was shortlisted for the Boardman Tasker prize in 2011.

The Far Eastern Fells

Author: Mark Richards

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 336

View: 373

A Lakeland Fellranger walking guide exploring 33 summits in the Far Eastern Fells of the Lake District, including a wide range of walks between Pooley Bridge to the north and Windermere to the south. Among the summits featured are Hallin Fell and Place Fell on the shores of Ullswater, Kidsty Pike above Haweswater and the fells of the famous Kentmere horseshoe to the south. Each of the 33 fells has a dedicated chapter describing a plethora of walking routes of differing characters and difficulties (from wide bridleways up to easy scrambles), which can easily be combined to make ascents, descents, traverses or ridge routes. The chapter begins with a customised Harvey map that illustrates the routes, and shows ridge connections to neighbouring fells to assist in the planning of extended walks. In many instances pen and ink drawn diagrams show the routes from a given perspective to assist visualisation. The guidebook is fully illustrated throughout with clear elevation diagrams, detailed summit panoramas and lots of inspiring photographs. The Far Eastern Fells is part of the eight-volume Lakeland Fellranger series by Mark Richards. Together they provide a comprehensive guide to walking in the Lake District, with a selection of routes up more than 220 hills.

Walking in Menorca

16 day and 2 multi-day routes

Author: Paddy Dillon

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 891

This guidebook is split into two parts. In the first, 16 one-day walks and one 4-day trek across the island lead you mostly inland to discover Menorca's castles, former military fortifications and picturesque windmills and houses, as well as its huge taulas and talaiots (ancient stone structures). The second is a 10-day circular trek of the long-distance historic bridleway Camí de Cavalls (path of horses), which leads you round the island's coastline of dramatic cliffs and secluded beaches. The 185km trail was completely restored in 2011 to offer plenty of opportunities for walking, cycling and horse riding. The guide provides practical information on transport, accommodation, refreshment and ways to explore even in the low season, as well as factual information on the castles, fortifications, windmills, towns and prehistoric stone 'taulas'. Menorca has long been known for its Balearic beaches, this guide looks beyond the summer sun to the wide reach of potential the island offers for walkers.