Urban Music Education

A Practical Guide for Teachers

Author: Kate Fitzpatrick-Harnish

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 776

The prevailing discourse surrounding urban music education suggests the deficit-laden notion that urban school settings are "less than," rather than "different than," their counterparts. Through the lens of contextually-specific teaching, this book provides a counternarrative on urban music education that encourages urban music teachers to focus on the strengths of their students as their primary resource. Through a combination of research-based strategies and practical suggestions from the author's own experience teaching music in urban settings, the book highlights important issues for teachers to consider, such as culturally relevant pedagogy, the "opportunity gap," race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, musical content, curricular change, music program development, student motivation, and strategies for finding inspiration and support. Throughout the book, the stories of five highly successful urban music teachers are highlighted, providing practical, real-world advice for music teachers across the domains of general, choral, band, and string music teaching. Recognizing that the term "urban" can encompass a wide variety of different school and community settings, this book challenges all teachers who work in under-served and under-resourced settings to take a critical look at their own music classroom and work to tailor their pedagogy to meet the particular needs of their students.

The Oxford Handbook of Social Justice in Music Education

Author: Cathy Benedict

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 544

View: 320

Music education has historically had a tense relationship with social justice. One the one hand, educators concerned with music practices have long preoccupied themselves with ideas of open participation and the potentially transformative capacity that musical interaction fosters. On the other hand, they have often done so while promoting and privileging a particular set of musical practices, traditions, and forms of musical knowledge, which has in turn alienated and even excluded many children from music education opportunities. The Oxford Handbook of Social Justice in Music Education provides a comprehensive overview and scholarly analyses of the major themes and issues relating to social justice in musical and educational practice worldwide. The first section of the handbook conceptualizes social justice while framing its pursuit within broader contexts and concerns. Authors in the succeeding sections of the handbook fill out what social justice entails for music teaching and learning in the home, school, university, and wider community as they grapple with cycles of injustice that might be perpetuated by music pedagogy. The concluding section of the handbook offers specific practical examples of social justice in action through a variety of educational and social projects and pedagogical practices that will inspire and guide those wishing to confront and attempt to ameliorate musical or other inequity and injustice. Consisting of 42 chapters by authors from across the globe, the handbook will be of interest to anyone who wishes to better understand what social justice is and why its pursuit in and through music education matters.

Engaging Students with Music Education

DJ decks, urban music and child-centred learning

Author: Pete Dale

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 166

View: 799

Engaging Students with Music Education is a groundbreaking book about using DJ decks and urban music in mainstream schools to re-engage disaffected learners and develop a curriculum which better reflects overall contemporary tastes. Many young learners are ‘at risk’ of exclusion; this book argues that for such individuals, the implications of such a shift in the music curriculum could be especially positive. Drawing extensively on the author’s own wealth of teaching experience, and bridging the gap between practice and theory, this book demonstrates through case studies that DJ decks can prove extremely valuable in mainstream classroom situations across the secondary school age ranges. Addressing challenging and crucial topics, combining rigorous theoretical analysis with practical suggestions, the book addresses questions such as: Are DJ decks actually a musical instrument, and are they suitable for classroom teaching? Will Ofsted's school inspectors approve of music teaching involving DJ decks and urban music? If we bring urban music into the classroom, will this further marginalise classical music? Are DJing and MCing skills recognised within examination specifications, at least in the UK? Current teachers will find the practical advice on how to incorporate DJ decks and urban music into their classroom especially helpful, whilst educational researchers will be captivated by the critical discussion of the child-centred tradition and a theoretical approach which stretches from ‘continental’ philosophy to practice-based reflection. With an insistence that the starting point for music education should always be the interests and experiences of the learners, this book is essential reading for those music teachers and researchers interested in the benefits of non-standard music-making in the classroom.

Urban Music Education

Teacher Perspectives on Critical Issues

Author: Tarik Hasani Rowland (Sr.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 316

View: 656

The purpose of this study was to investigate teacher perceptions of current critical issues in urban music education programs. Specifically, the research questions asked were: 1) What are the major challenges and gratifications experienced by urban instrumental music teachers? 2) What teaching strategies best promote musical achievement and engage urban students? 3) What are the most effective strategies for recruiting and retaining urban music educators? A review of literature provided information on the characteristics of urban culture, the needs of music education in urban schools, culturally relevant teaching, diversified teacher preparation, the recruitment and retention of urban teachers, and profiles of successful urban teachers. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used to provide a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of teacher perspectives. A survey questionnaire was sent to music educators in the Atlanta Public School system (N = 70). In addition, urban music educators (n = 6) were interviewed to gain additional insight regarding the specific challenges and practices of urban educators. Results of the study indicated that: -Although a major challenge is present in the need to address cultural differences and connect with the students, teachers value the opportunity to instill the values experienced in musical performances0́4teamwork and the belief that success is possible through hard work and perseverance.-Successful urban teachers set boundaries and remain consistent in their daily expectations and procedures0́4while letting students know that they genuinely care about them.-Music teacher education programs should ensure that all graduates are well prepared to teach in an urban environment and have been exposed to diverse types of school populations.

Including Everyone

Creating Music Classrooms Where All Children Learn

Author: Judith Jellison

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 249

Many practical books for music educators who work with special needs students focus on students' disabilities, rather than on the inclusive classroom more generally. In Including Everyone: Creating Music Classrooms Where All Children Learn, veteran teacher and pedagogue Judith Jellison offers a new approach that identifies broader principles of inclusive music instruction writ large. As she demonstrates in this aptly-titled book, the perceived impediments to successfully including the wide diversity of children in schools in meaningful music instruction often stem not from insurmountable obstacles but from a lack of imagination. How do teachers and parents create diverse musical communities in which all children develop skills, deepen understanding, and cultivate independence in a culture of accomplishment and joy? Including Everyone equips music teachers with five principles of effective instruction for mixed special needs / traditional settings that are applicable in both classroom and rehearsal rooms alike. These five guidelines lay out Jellison's argument for a new way to teach music that shifts attention away from thinking of children in terms of symptoms. The effective teacher, argues Jellison, will strive to offer a curriculum that will not only allow the child with a disability to be more successful, but will also apply to and improve instruction for typically developing students. In this compelling new book, Judith Jellison illustrates what it takes to imagine, create, and realize possibilities for all children in ways that inspire parents, teachers, and the children themselves to take part in collaborative music making. Her book helps readers recognize how this most central component of human culture is one that allows everyone to participate, learn, and grow. Jellison is a leader in her field, and the wealth of knowledge she makes available in this book is extensive and valuable. It should aid her peers and inspire a new generation of student teachers.

Teaching music in the urban classroom

Author: Carol Frierson-Campbell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 194

View: 432

Examines the issues of music instruction in urban schools and provides political, philosophical, and practical approaches to music education.

Promising Practices in 21st Century Music Teacher Education

Author: Michele Kaschub

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 350

This book surveys emerging music and education landscapes to present a sampling of the promising practices of music teacher education that may serve as new models for the 21st century. Contributors explore the delicate balance between curriculum and pedagogy, the power structures that influence music education at all levels, the role of contemporary musical practices in teacher education, and the communication challenges that surround institutional change. Models of programs that feature in-school, out-of-school and beyond school contexts, lifespan learning perspectives, active juxtapositions of formal and informal approaches to teaching and learning, student-driven project-based fieldwork, and the purposeful employment of technology and digital media as platforms for authentic music engagement within a contemporary participatory culture are all offered as springboards for innovative practice.

Teaching Music

The Urban Experience

Author: Lisa C DeLorenzo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 192

View: 619

This timely book explores teaching music in the urban setting along with interviews and journal accounts from urban music teachers in a variety of specializations. Written for pre-service music education students and music teachers new to urban teaching, this is a must-read for those considering teaching in the urban schools. Selected topics include culturally responsive teaching; White teachers working with students of color; nurturing pedagogy for at-risk youths; working with ESL students and immigrant families; creating a democratic and socially just music classroom; and developing habits of teaching that promote resilience and confidence in the emotional, social, and academic well-being of young musicians. A valuable resource for music teaching, this book features an accessible blend of theory and practice with authentic stories from the field.

Policy and the Political Life of Music Education

Standpoints for Understanding and Action

Author: Richard Colwell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education and state

Page: 296

View: 153

Policy and the Political Life of Music Education is the first book of its kind in the field of Music Education. It offers a far-reaching and innovative outlook, bringing together expert voices who provide a multifaceted and global set of insights into a critical arena for action today: policy. On one hand, the book helps the novice to make sense of what policy is, how it functions, and how it is discussed in various parts of the world; while on the other, it offers the experienced educator a set of critically written analyses that outline the state of the play of music education policy thinking. As policy participation remains largely underexplored in music education, the book helps to clarify to teachers how policy thinking does shape educational action and directly influences the nature, extent, and impact of our programs. The goal is to help readers understand the complexities of policy and to become better skilled in how to think, speak, and act in policy terms. The book provides new ways to understand and therefore imagine policy, approximating it to the lives of educators and highlighting its importance and impact. This is an essential read for anyone interested in change and how to better understand decision-making within music and education. Finally, this book, while aimed at the growth of music educators' knowledge-base regarding policy, also fosters 'open thinking' regarding policy as subject, helping educators straddling arts and education to recognize that policy thinking can offer creative designs for educational change.