Understanding Scotland Musically

Folk, Tradition and Policy

Author: Simon McKerrell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 290

View: 567

Scottish traditional music has been through a successful revival in the mid-twentieth century and has now entered a professionalised and public space. Devolution in the UK and the surge of political debate surrounding the independence referendum in Scotland in 2014 led to a greater scrutiny of regional and national identities within the UK, set within the wider context of cultural globalisation. This volume brings together a range of authors that sets out to explore the increasingly plural and complex notions of Scotland, as performed in and through traditional music. Traditional music has played an increasingly prominent role in the public life of Scotland, mirrored in other Anglo-American traditions. This collection principally explores this movement from historically text-bound musical authenticity towards more transient sonic identities that are blurring established musical genres and the meaning of what constitutes ‘traditional’ music today. The volume therefore provides a cohesive set of perspectives on how traditional music performs Scottishness at this crucial moment in the public life of an increasingly (dis)United Kingdom.

Focus: Scottish Traditional Music

Author: Simon McKerrell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 174

View: 954

Focus: Scottish Traditional Music engages methods from ethnomusicology, popular music studies, cultural studies, and media studies to explain how complex Scottish identities and culture are constructed in the traditional music and culture of Scotland. This book examines Scottish music through their social and performative contexts, outlining vocal traditions such as lullabies, mining songs, Scottish ballads, herding songs, and protest songs as well as instrumental traditions such as fiddle music, country dances, and informal evening pub sessions. Case studies explore the key ideas in understanding Scotland musically by exploring ethnicity, Britishness, belonging, politics, transmission and performance, positioning the cultural identity of Scotland within the United Kingdom. Visit the author's companion website at http://www.scottishtraditionalmusic.org/ for additional resources.

Violins

Local Meanings, Globalized Sounds

Author: Pamela A. Moro

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 140

View: 114

Violins: Local Meanings, Globalized Sounds examines the violin as an object of meaning in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, and as a vehicle for introducing anthropological issues. Each chapter highlights concepts as taught in lower-level anthropology courses, and includes teaching and learning tools. Chapters range from a memoir-like social biography of a single instrument to explorations of violins in relation to technology, labor, the environment, migration, globalization, childhood, cultural understandings of talent and virtuosity, and prestige.

Rock: The Primary Text

Developing a Musicology of Rock

Author: Allan F Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 322

View: 163

This thoroughly revised third edition of Allan F. Moore's ground-breaking book, now co-authored with Remy Martin, incorporates new material on rock music theory, style change and the hermeneutic method developed in Moore’s Song Means (2012). An even larger array of musicians is discussed, bringing the book right into the 21st century. Rock's 'primary text' – its sounds – is the focus of attention here. The authors argue for the development of a musicology particular to rock within the context of the background to the genres, the beat and rhythm and blues styles of the early 1960s, 'progressive' rock, punk rock, metal and subsequent styles. They also explore the fundamental issue of rock as a medium for self-expression, and the relationship of this to changing musical styles. Rock: The Primary Text remains innovative in its exploration of an aesthetics of rock.

Popular Song in the First World War

An International Perspective

Author: John Mullen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 260

View: 251

What did popular song mean to people across the world during the First World War? For the first time, song repertoires and musical industries from countries on both sides in the Great War as well as from neutral countries are analysed in one exciting volume. Experts from around the world, and with very different approaches, bring to life the entertainment of a century ago, to show the role it played in the lives of our ancestors. The reader will meet the penniless lyricist, the theatre chain owner, the cross-dressing singer, fado composer, stage Scotsman or rhyming soldier, whether they come from Serbia, Britain, the USA, Germany, France, Portugal or elsewhere, in this fascinating exploration of showbiz before the generalization of the gramophone. Singing was a vector for patriotic support for the war, and sometimes for anti-war activism, but it was much more than that, and expressed and constructed debates, anxieties, social identities and changes in gender roles. This work, accompanied by many links to online recordings, will allow the reader to glimpse the complex role of popular song in people’s lives in a period of total war.

Musical Scotland, Past and Present

Being a Dictionary of Scottish Musicians from about 1400 Till the Present Time, to which is Added a Bibliography of Musical Publications Connected with Scotland from 1611

Author: David Baptie

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 253

View: 483

Music

Author: Ralph Hill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page:

View: 125

Books in Scotland

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dialect literature, Scottish

Page:

View: 909

Erik Chisholm, Scottish Modernist, 1904-1965

Chasing a Restless Muse

Author: John Purser

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 283

View: 351

A study of the life and works of Erik Chisholm, one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century Scottish music.

Being English in Scotland

Author: Murray Watson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 765

Using a range of different sources including oral history contributions from English people living all over Scotland, Watson explores how the English merged into and contributed to Scottish society in the second half of the twentieth century.