This Land was Theirs

A Study of Native North Americans

Author: Wendell H. Oswalt

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 531

View: 207

Designed for undergraduate courses in Native North Americans, the text surveys both traditional and contemporary Indian lifeways. Oswalt looks at 12 North American Indian tribes, ranging from the Netsilik hunters of the Arctic Circle to the Natchez farmers of the Mississippi. These groups represent the major culture areas and levels of socioeconomic complexity among North American Indians. After introductory chapters devoted to pan-tribal issues, the author traces each tribe's story, fromaboriginal life through historical changes to its current place among the native nations.

Eskimos and Explorers

Author: Wendell H. Oswalt

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 341

View: 694

Corrects misconceptions about Eskimo life, analyzes early accounts by European explorers, and evaluates the impact these explorers had on Eskimo culture

An Introduction to Native North America

Author: Mark Q. Sutton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 476

An Introduction to Native North America provides a basic introduction to the Native Peoples of North America, covering what are now the United States, northern Mexico, and Canada. It covers the history of research, basic prehistory, the European invasion and the impact of Europeans on Native cultures. A final chapter covers contemporary Native Americans, including issues of religion, health, and politics. In this updated and revised new edition, Mark Q. Sutton has expanded and improved the existing text as well as adding a new case study, updated the text with new research, and included new perspectives, particularly those of Native peoples. Featuring case studies of several tribes, as well as over 60 maps and images, An Introduction to Native North America is an indispensable tool to those studying the history of North America and Native Peoples of North America. .

Achieving Aboriginal Student Success

A Guide for K to 8 Classrooms

Author: Pamela Rose Toulouse

Publisher: Portage & Main Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 198

View: 176

Achieving Aboriginal Student Success presents goals and strategies needed to support Aboriginal learners in the classroom. This book is for all teachers of kindergarten to grade 8 who have Aboriginal students in their classrooms or who are looking for ways to infuse an Aboriginal worldview into their curriculum. Although the author s primary focus is the needs of Aboriginal students, the ideas are best practices that can be applied in classroom-management techniques, assessment tools, suggestions for connecting to the Aboriginal community, and much more! The strategies and information in this resource are about building bridges between cultures that foster respect, appreciation, and understanding."

An Introduction to Native North America -- Pearson eText

Author: Mark Q. Sutton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 570

An Introduction to Native North America provides a basic introduction to the native peoples of North America, including both the United States and Canada. It covers the history of research, basic prehistory, the European invasion and the impact of Europeans on Native cultures. Additionally, much of the book is written from the perspective of the ethnographic present, and the various cultures are described as they were at the specific times noted in the text. Teaching and Learning Experiences: Improve Critical Thinking - An Introduction to Native North America provides internet resources for students to supplement reading material, and contains an extensive bibliography to aid in their research. Engage Students - An Introduction to Native North America highlights important individuals in "VIP Profile" mini-biographies, and contains "Sidelights" throughout the text which provides short explanations of interesting aspects of native culture. Support Instructors - Teaching your course just got easier! You can create a Customized Text or use our Instructor's Manual, Electronic "MyTest" Test Bank or PowerPoint Presentation Slides. Plus, An Introduction to Native North America's organization was designed to be used in conjunction with the Handbook of North American Indians, published by the Smithsonian Institution.

To be Indian

The Life of Iroquois-Seneca Arthur Caswell Parker

Author: Joy Porter

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 309

View: 874

Born on the Seneca Indian Reservation in New York State, Arthur Caswell Parker (1881-1955) was a prominent intellectual leader both within and outside tribal circles. Of mixed Iroquois, Seneca, and Anglican descent, Parker was also a controversial figure-recognized as an advocate for Indians but criticized for his assimilationist stance. In this exhaustively researched biography-the first book-length examination of Parker’s life and career-Joy Porter explores complex issues of Indian identity that are as relevant today as in Parker’s time. From childhood on, Parker learned from his well-connected family how to straddle both Indian and white worlds. His great-uncle, Ely S. Parker, was Commissioner of Indian Affairs under Ulysses S. Grant--the first American Indian to hold the position. Influenced by family role models and a strong formal education, Parker, who became director of the Rochester Museum, was best known for his work as a "museologist" (a word he coined). Porter shows that although Parker achieved success within the dominant Euro-American culture, he was never entirely at ease with his role as assimilated Indian and voiced frustration at having "to play Indian to be Indian." In expressing this frustration, Parker articulated a challenging predicament for twentieth-century Indians: the need to negotiate imposed stereotypes, to find ways to transcend those stereotypes, and to assert an identity rooted in the present rather than in the past.

An Introduction to Native North America

Author: Mark Q. Sutton

Publisher: Boston ; Toronto : Allyn and Bacon

ISBN:

Category: Aleuts

Page: 404

View: 677

""An Introduction to Native North America" provides a basic introduction to the Native Peoples of North America, including both Eskimos and Indians." Beginning with a discussion of the geography of North America, this excellent book delves into the history of research, basic prehistory, the European invasion, and the impact of Europeans on Native cultures. A final chapter covers contemporary Native Americans, including issues of religion, health, and politics. Much of the book is also written from the perspective of the ethnographic present, and the various cultures are described as they were at the specific times noted in the book." For anyone interested in anthropology and the history of North America and Native Peoples of North America.

Empire by Treaty

Negotiating European Expansion, 1600-1900

Author: Saliha Belmessous

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 377

Most histories of European appropriation of indigenous territories have, until recently, focused on conquest and occupation, while relatively little attention has been paid to the history of treaty-making. Yet treaties were also a means of extending empire. To grasp the extent of European legal engagement with indigenous peoples, Empire by Treaty: Negotiating European Expansion, 1600-1900 looks at the history of treaty-making in European empires (Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, French and British) from the early 17th to the late 19th century, that is, during both stages of European imperialism. While scholars have often dismissed treaties assuming that they would have been fraudulent or unequal, this book argues that there was more to the practice of treaty-making than mere commercial and political opportunism. Indeed, treaty-making was also promoted by Europeans as a more legitimate means of appropriating indigenous sovereignties and acquiring land than were conquest or occupation, and therefore as a way to reconcile expansion with moral and juridical legitimacy. As for indigenous peoples, they engaged in treaty-making as a way to further their interests even if, on the whole, they gained far less than the Europeans from those agreements and often less than they bargained for. The vexed history of treaty-making presents particular challenges for the great expectations placed in treaties for the resolution of conflicts over indigenous rights in post-colonial societies. These hopes are held by both indigenous peoples and representatives of the post-colonial state and yet, both must come to terms with the complex and troubled history of treaty-making over 300 years of empire. Empire by Treaty looks at treaty-making in Dutch colonial expansion, the Spanish-Portuguese border in the Americas, aboriginal land in Canada, French colonial West Africa, and British India.