Thirty-Eight

The Hurricane That Transformed New England

Author: Stephen Long

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300209517

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 411

A groundbreaking account of the cataclysmic hurricane of 1938 and its devastating impact on New England s inland forests"

Sudden Sea

The Great Hurricane of 1938

Author: R.A. Scotti

Publisher: Back Bay Books

ISBN: 031605478X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5214

The massive destruction wreaked by the Hurricane of 1938 dwarfed that of the Chicago Fire, the San Francisco Earthquake, and the Mississippi floods of 1927, making the storm the worst natural disaster in U.S. history. Now, R.A. Scotti tells the story.

The 1938 Hurricane Along New England's Coast

Author: Joseph P. Soares

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738557595

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 4009

Pictorial images of the devastation of New England's coast after a devastating hurricane in 1938.

Freedom Journey

Black Civil War Soldiers and The Hills Community, Westchester County, New York

Author: Edythe Ann Quinn

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438455399

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 2842

The story of thirty-six African American men who drew upon their shared community of The Hills for support as they fought in the Civil War. Through wonderfully detailed letters, recruit rosters, and pension records, Edythe Ann Quinn shares the story of thirty-five African American Civil War soldiers and the United States Colored Troop (USCT) regiments with which they served. Associated with The Hills community in Westchester County, New York, the soldiers served in three regiments: the 29th Connecticut Infantry, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (11th USCT), and the 20th USCT. The thirty-sixth Hills man served in the Navy. Their ties to family, land, church, school, and occupational experiences at home buffered the brutal indifference of boredom and battle, the ravages of illness, the deprivations of unequal pay, and the hostility of some commissioned officers and white troops. At the same time, their service among kith and kin bolstered their determination and pride. They marched together, first as raw recruits, and finally as seasoned veterans, welcomed home by generals, politicians, and above all, their families and friends. “Quinn’s meticulous research and refined historical interpretation has allowed her to recover a uniquely enlightening chapter of nineteenth-century African American history in the North. By tracing the lives of Union soldiers from a free, black community in Westchester County, New York, we discover the commitment of these men and their families from The Hills to the eradication of slavery in the South. With notable sensitivity, the author produces a tale of black men who risked their lives and the security of their families for the sake of freedom. It is a story about conviction—poignant, inspiring, and persuasive.” — Myra Young Armstead, editor of Mighty Change, Tall Within: Black Identity in the Hudson Valley “As an in-depth case study of the African American volunteers from The Hills community who served in the Civil War, Edythe Ann Quinn’s Freedom Journey is a well-researched book that explores a much needed ethnic aspect of that war. For those interested in genealogy and local history, Freedom Journey offers unique insights into the social and cultural history of The Hills community, first settled in the 1790s. Additionally, the work contains a roster of the volunteers and thirteen historical sidebars that relate to the African American wartime experience.” — Anthony F. Gero, author of Black Soldiers of New York State: A Proud Legacy “Edythe Ann Quinn has taken a little-known community, The Hills in Westchester County, and using a comprehensively well-resourced and researched methodology, has written not only an enjoyable and engagingly attractive family history (individual and collective) of black New Yorkers from slavery to freedom, but as well the sacrifices that the community’s young men gave. It is the voices of those sable warriors that are heard through the personal letters, woven into the overall engaging literary style of the author.” — A. J. Williams-Myers, author of Long Hammering: Essays on the Forging of an African American Presence in the Hudson River Valley to the Early Twentieth Century

Saving Saltaire

The Hurricane Of 1938

Author: Joan Callahan-Hellthaler

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 9781482368123

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 86

View: 8067

"Leave old Saltaire with a cheer, we'll all come back next year..". or would they? Join twelve-year-old Dottie Schmitt and her family as they face this unexpected hurricane in September 1938. This monster storm directly hits Saltaire, the tiny beach village on Fire Island, where Dottie spends her summer each year. What happens to Dottie and can Saltaire survive after such a devasting natural disaster? Saving Saltaire will take you back to this fateful day and the aftermath of the 1938 Hurricane.

The Cure for Catastrophe

How We Can Stop Manufacturing Natural Disasters

Author: Robert Muir-Wood

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096476

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 3267

We can’t stop natural disasters, but we can stop them from being disastrous. One of the world’s foremost risk experts tells us how. Year after year, floods sweep cities clean, earthquakes tear apart communities, and tornadoes uproot towns. Disasters bring with them rampage and despair. But does it have to be this way? In The Cure for Catastrophe, Robert Muir-Wood makes the controversial claim that our natural disasters are in fact human ones: we keep building in the wrong places and in the wrong way, putting brick buildings in the way of earthquakes, wood ones in the way of fire, and cities in the paths of tropical storms. We refuse to evacuate, blindly trusting our flood walls and disaster preparations, until they fail, making catastrophes even more deadly. From the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 to Hurricane Katrina, the story of natural disasters is less about a hostile environment than about human foolishness, denial, and greed. But there is hope, if humans cause catastrophes, we can also prevent them.

American Road

The Story of an Epic Transcontinental Journey at the Dawn of the Motor Age

Author: Pete Davies

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1466862823

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4978

A fascinating account of the greatest road trip in American history. On July 7, 1919, an extraordinary cavalcade of sixty-nine military motor vehicles set off from the White House on an epic journey. Their goal was California, and ahead of them lay 3,250 miles of dirt, mud, rock, and sand. Sixty-two days later they arrived in San Francisco, having averaged just five miles an hour. Known as the First Transcontinental Motor Train, this trip was an adventure, a circus, a public relations coup, and a war game all rolled into one. As road conditions worsened, it also became a daily battle of sweat and labor, of guts and determination. American Road is the story of this incredible journey. Pete Davies takes us from east to west, bringing to life the men on the trip, their trials with uncooperative equipment and weather, and the punishing landscape they encountered. Ironically one of the participants was a young soldier named Dwight Eisenhower, who, four decades later, as President, launched the building of the interstate highway system. Davies also provides a colorful history of transcontinental car travel in this country, including the first cross-country trips and the building of the Lincoln Highway. This richly detailed book offers a slice of Americana, a piece of history unknown to many, and a celebration of our love affair with the road.

Watching, from the Edge of Extinction

Author: Beverly Peterson Stearns,Stephen C. Stearns

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300084696

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 1067

Annotation In this mesmerizing series of interviews with dedicated people who work to save endangered species throughout the world, an alarming truth emerges: the obstacles of human politics, greed, corruption, folly, and hypocrisy can present as much danger to a species' survival as biological causes. The dramatic lessons of this book shed new light on the problems of declining species and offer hope that we may yet change their fate.

Lolita

Author: Vladimir Nabokov

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307744029

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 6203

Awe and exhiliration--along with heartbreak and mordant wit--abound in Lolita, Nabokov's most famous and controversial novel, which tells the story of the aging Humbert Humbert's obsessive, devouring, and doomed passion for the nymphet Dolores Haze. Lolita is also the story of a hypercivilized European colliding with the cheerful barbarism of postwar America. Most of all, it is a meditation on love--love as outrage and hallucination, madness and transformation.

Logging Along the Moose River

The Story of the Victory Branch Railroad

Author: Bill Gove

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781931271318

Category: History

Page: 106

View: 4857

Isaac's Storm

A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History

Author: Erik Larson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307874095

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1492

At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf. That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not. In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced. In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss. Meticulously researched and vividly written, Isaac's Storm is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, Isaac's Storm carries a warning for our time. From the Hardcover edition.

Be Centered in Christ and Not in Self

The Missionary Society of Saint Columban: the North American Story (1918–2018)

Author: Angelyn Dries

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1543436226

Category: Religion

Page: 462

View: 7836

The story of the one hundred years (19182018) of the Missionary Society of St. Columban is filled with adventure, stress, and danger, with the humdrum of daily life, with martyrs (twenty-seven of them thus far, including Columban Sister Joan Sawyer), with innumerable personal and society global connections and issues, with men who went from the familiarity of daily life and people they knew to lands and people unknown to bring the good news. The story is charged with humor and courage, along with faith, hope, and love. The people in this story lived within particular national histories and an evolving global Christianity. The history of the US region of the Missionary Society of St. Columban interacts with movements of Catholic and American history. These contexts influenced the ability of the Columbans to grow in the United States, to provide desperately needed resources for the missions, and to further Catholic engagement in the mission.

The Book of Common Prayer

And Administration of the Sacraments, and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church,

Author: Church of England

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 438

View: 3079

In the Heart of the Sea

The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101221570

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3905

From the author of Mayflower, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane's Eye--the riveting bestseller tells the story of the true events that inspired Melville's Moby-Dick. Winner of the National Book Award, Nathaniel Philbrick's book is a fantastic saga of survival and adventure, steeped in the lore of whaling, with deep resonance in American literature and history. In 1820, the whaleship Essex was rammed and sunk by an angry sperm whale, leaving the desperate crew to drift for more than ninety days in three tiny boats. Nathaniel Philbrick uses little-known documents and vivid details about the Nantucket whaling tradition to reveal the chilling facts of this infamous maritime disaster. In the Heart of the Sea, recently adapted into a major feature film starring Chris Hemsworth, is a book for the ages.

Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens

Author: Steve Olson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393242803

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 8053

Survival narrative meets scientific, natural, and social history in the riveting story of a volcanic disaster. For months in early 1980, scientists, journalists, sightseers, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings in Mount St. Helens, part of the chain of western volcanoes fueled by the 700-mile-long Cascadia fault. Still, no one was prepared when an immense eruption took the top off of the mountain and laid waste to hundreds of square miles of verdant forests in southwestern Washington State. The eruption was one of the largest in human history, deposited ash in eleven U.S. states and five Canadian provinces, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. It killed fifty-seven people, some as far as thirteen miles away from the volcano’s summit. Shedding new light on the cataclysm, author Steve Olson interweaves the history and science behind this event with page-turning accounts of what happened to those who lived and those who died. Powerful economic and historical forces influenced the fates of those around the volcano that sunny Sunday morning, including the construction of the nation’s railroads, the harvest of a continent’s vast forests, and the protection of America’s treasured public lands. The eruption of Mount St. Helens revealed how the past is constantly present in the lives of us all. At the same time, it transformed volcanic science, the study of environmental resilience, and, ultimately, our perceptions of what it will take to survive on an increasingly dangerous planet. Rich with vivid personal stories of lumber tycoons, loggers, volcanologists, and conservationists, Eruption delivers a spellbinding narrative built from the testimonies of those closest to the disaster, and an epic tale of our fraught relationship with the natural world.

The Stars are Fire

Author: Anita Shreve

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0385350902

Category: Fiction

Page: 241

View: 2272

A novel based on the true story of the largest fire in Maine's history follows the experiences of a pregnant woman who struggles to protect her two young children and watches her home burn while her husband joins the volunteer firefighters.

Deluge

Tropical Storm Irene, Vermont's Flash Floods, and How One Small State Saved Itself

Author: Peggy Shinn

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611683181

Category: Nature

Page: 232

View: 8525

Tropical Storm Irene in Vermont, from the perspective of Vermonters who rebuilt their state

Storm Surge

Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future

Author: Adam Sobel

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 006230478X

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 5117

A renowned scientist takes us through the devastating and unprecedented events of Hurricane Sandy, using it to explain our planet’s changing climate, and what we need to do to protect ourselves and our cities for the future. Was Hurricane Sandy a freak event—or a harbinger of things to come? Was climate change responsible? What connects the spiraling clouds our satellites saw from space, the brackish water that rose up over the city’s seawalls, and the slow simmer of greenhouse gases? Why weren't we better prepared? In this fascinating and accessible work of popular science, atmospheric scientist and Columbia University professor Adam Sobel addresses these questions, combining scientific explanation with first-hand experience of the event itself. He explains the remarkable atmospheric conditions that gave birth to Sandy and determined its path. He gives us insight into the sophisticated science that led to the forecasts of the storm before it hit, as well as an understanding of why our meteorological vocabulary failed our leaders in warning us about this unprecedented storm—part hurricane, part winter-type nor’easter, fully deserving of the title “Superstorm.” Storm Surge brings together the melting glaciers, the shifting jet streams, and the warming oceans to make clear how our changing climate will make New York and other cities more vulnerable than ever to huge storms—and how we need to think differently about these long-term risks if we hope to mitigate the damage. Engaging, informative, and timely, Sobel’s book provokes us to rethink the future of our climate and how we can better prepare for the storms to come.

The Hunter's Game

Poachers and Conservationists in Twentieth-century America

Author: Louis S. Warren

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300080865

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 3828

The Hunter's Game reveals that early wildlife conservation was driven not by heroic idealism, but by the interests of recreational hunters and the tourist industry. As American wildlife populations declined at the end of the nineteenth century, elite, urban sportsmen began to lobby for game laws that would restrict the customary hunting practices of immigrants, Indians, and other local hunters.