Thirty-Eight

The Hurricane That Transformed New England

Author: Stephen Long

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 272

View: 604

The hurricane that pummeled the northeastern United States on September 21, 1938, was New England’s most damaging weather event ever. To call it “New England’s Katrina” might be to understate its power. Without warning, the storm plowed into Long Island and New England, killing hundreds of people and destroying roads, bridges, dams, and buildings that stood in its path. Not yet spent, the hurricane then raced inland, maintaining high winds into Vermont and New Hampshire and uprooting millions of acres of forest. This book is the first to investigate how the hurricane of ’38 transformed New England, bringing about social and ecological changes that can still be observed these many decades later. The hurricane’s impact was erratic—some swaths of forest were destroyed while others nearby remained unscathed; some stricken forests retain their prehurricane character, others have been transformed. Stephen Long explores these contradictions, drawing on survivors’ vivid memories of the storm and its aftermath and on his own familiarity with New England’s forests, where he discovers clues to the storm’s legacies even now. Thirty-Eight is a gripping story of a singularly destructive hurricane. It also provides important and insightful information on how best to prepare for the inevitable next great storm.

50 Hikes in Connecticut (6th Edition) (Explorer's 50 Hikes)

Author: Mary Anne Hardy

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 377

Hikes and walks throughout the Nutmeg State Leave the dense cities and tourist destinations of New England behind to explore the woods and hills of this beautiful state. Connecticut boasts a diversity of parks, sanctuaries, hills, woodlands, and wetlands, with hidden gems to satisfy hikers and explorers of all ilks. This sixth edition has been fully revised and updated to be the most comprehensive and thorough guide to Connecticut’s trails. The hikes range in length from 1 to 13 miles, and an overview chart makes it easy to choose a hike at a glance. Each chapter includes a detailed, easy- to- read map, information on mileage and rise, a clear trail description, and a wealth of information on natural and human history you’ll encounter along the way. Hikes include: • Sleeping Giant State Park • Bear Mountain • Wadsworth Falls • Windsor Locks Canal • Green Fall Pond

The Big Muddy

An Environmental History of the Mississippi and Its Peoples from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina

Author: Christopher Morris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 271

In The Big Muddy, the first long-term environmental history of the Mississippi, Christopher Morris offers a brilliant tour across five centuries as he illuminates the interaction between people and the landscape, from early hunter-gatherer bands to present-day industrial and post-industrial society. Morris shows that when Hernando de Soto arrived at the lower Mississippi Valley, he found an incredibly vast wetland, forty thousand square miles of some of the richest, wettest land in North America, deposited there by the big muddy river that ran through it. But since then much has changed, for the river and for the surrounding valley. Indeed, by the 1890s, the valley was rapidly drying. Morris shows how centuries of increasingly intensified human meddling--including deforestation, swamp drainage, and levee construction--led to drought, disease, and severe flooding. He outlines the damage done by the introduction of foreign species, such as the Argentine nutria, which escaped into the wild and are now busy eating up Louisiana's wetlands. And he critiques the most monumental change in the lower Mississippi Valley--the reconstruction of the river itself, largely under the direction of the Army Corps of Engineers. Valley residents have been paying the price for these human interventions, most visibly with the disaster that followed Hurricane Katrina. Morris also describes how valley residents have been struggling to reinvigorate the valley environment in recent years--such as with the burgeoning catfish and crawfish industries--so that they may once again live off its natural abundance. Morris concludes that the problem with Katrina is the problem with the Amazon Rainforest, drought and famine in Africa, and fires and mudslides in California--it is the end result of the ill-considered bending of natural environments to human purposes.