The World New Made

Figurative Painting in the Twentieth Century

Author: Timothy Hyman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500239452

Category:

Page: 256

View: 8430

A bold new critique of the accepted history of figurative painting in the twentieth century

New Self, New World

Recovering Our Senses in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Philip Shepherd

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN: 1583944028

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 512

View: 4323

New Self, New World challenges the primary story of what it means to be human, the random and materialistic lifestyle that author Philip Shepherd calls our “shattered reality.” This reality encourages us to live in our heads, self-absorbed in our own anxieties. Drawing on diverse sources and inspiration, New Self, New World reveals that our state of head-consciousness falsely teaches us to see the body as something we possess and to try to take care of it without ever really learning how to inhabit it. Shepherd articulates his vision of a world in which each of us enjoys a direct, unmediated experience of being alive. He petitions against the futile pursuit of the “known self” and instead reveals the simple grace of just being present. In compelling prose, Shepherd asks us to surrender to the reality of “what is” that enables us to reunite with our own being. Each chapter is accompanied by exercises meant to bring Shepherd’s vision into daily life, what the author calls a practice that “facilitates the voluntary sabotage of long-standing patterns.” New Self, New World is at once a philosophical primer, a spiritual handbook, and a roaming inquiry into human history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Why This World: A Biography of Clarice Lispector

Author: Benjamin Moser

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199743924

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 7463

"That rare person who looked like Marlene Dietrich and wrote like Virginia Woolf," Clarice Lispector is one of the most popular but least understood of Latin American writers. Now, after years of research on three continents, drawing on previously unknown manuscripts and dozens of interviews, Benjamin Moser demonstrates how Lispector's development as a writer was directly connected to the story of her turbulent life. Born in the nightmarish landscape of post-World War I Ukraine, Clarice became, virtually from adolescence, a person whose beauty, genius, and eccentricity intrigued Brazil. Why This World tells how this precocious girl, through long exile abroad and difficult personal struggles, matured into a great writer. It also asserts, for the first time, the deep roots in the Jewish mystical tradition that make her the true heir to Kafka as well as the unlikely author of "perhaps the greatest spiritual autobiography of the twentieth century." From Chechelnik to Recife, from Naples and Berne to Washington and Rio de Janeiro, Why This World strips away the mythology surrounding this extraordinary figure and shows how Clarice Lispector transformed one woman's struggles into a universally resonant art.

Motel of the Mysteries

Author: David Macaulay

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547348629

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 96

View: 2044

It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.

Banana

The Fate of the Fruit that Changed the World

Author: Dan Koeppel

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781594630385

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 281

View: 3220

From its early beginnings in Southeast Asia, to the machinations of the United Fruit Company in Costa Rica and Central America, the banana's history and its fate as a victim of fungus are explored.

Arshile Gorky

1904-1948, a Retrospective

Author: Diane Waddmann,Arshile Gorky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Abstract expressionism

Page: 285

View: 5859

Sprezzatura

50 Ways Italian Genius Shaped the World

Author: Peter D'Epiro,Mary Desmond Pinkowish

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307427922

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4063

A witty, erudite celebration of fifty great Italian cultural achievements that have significantly influenced Western civilization from the authors of What Are the Seven Wonders of the World? “Sprezzatura,” or the art of effortless mastery, was coined in 1528 by Baldassare Castiglione in The Book of the Courtier. No one has demonstrated effortless mastery throughout history quite like the Italians. From the Roman calendar and the creator of the modern orchestra (Claudio Monteverdi) to the beginnings of ballet and the creator of modern political science (Niccolò Machiavelli), Sprezzatura highlights fifty great Italian cultural achievements in a series of fifty information-packed essays in chronological order. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Twentieth-Century Boy

Notebooks of the Seventies

Author: Duncan Hannah

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 1524733407

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 1263

A celebrated New York City painter's rollicking and vividly immediate account of his life amid the city's glamorous demimondes in their most vital era as an aspiring artist, roaring boy, dandy, cultural omnivore, and far-from-obscure object of desire. Duncan Hannah arrived in New York City from Minneapolis in the early 1970s as an art student hungry for experience, game for almost anything, and with a prodigious taste for drugs, girls, alcohol, movies, rock and roll, books, parties, and everything else the city had to offer. He also happened to be outrageously, androgynously beautiful, attracting the attention of the city's most prominent gay scenemeisters, who found his adamant heterosexuality a source of immense frustration. Taken directly from the notebooks Hannah kept throughout the seventies, Twentieth-Century Boy is a louche, sometimes lurid, and incredibly entertaining report from a now almost mythical time and place, full of outrageously bad behavior, naked ambition, gender-bending celebrities, fantastically good music and evaporating barriers of taste and decorum. At its center: a young man in the mix and on the make, determined to forge an identity for himself as an artist while being at risk from his own heedless appetites. A time capsule from a scary, seedy, but irresistible time and place.

A Brush with the Real

Figurative Painting Today

Author: Marc Valli,Margherita Dessanay

Publisher: Laurence King Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 320

View: 3506

Presents a survey of contemporary painters working within a realist tradition, offering a look into the life and career of each artist, discussing their methods, motives, and sources.

The Lonely City

Adventures in the Art of Being Alone

Author: Olivia Laing

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250039576

Category: Art

Page: 336

View: 325

"You can be lonely anywhere, but there is a particular flavor to the loneliness that comes from living in a city, surrounded by thousands of strangers. The Lonely City is a roving cultural history of urban loneliness, centered on the ultimate city: Manhattan, that teeming island of gneiss, concrete, and glass. What does it mean to be lonely? How do we live, if we're not intimately involved with another human being? How do we connect with other people, particularly if our sexuality or physical body is considered deviant or damaged? Does technology draw us closer together or trap us behind screens? Olivia Laing explores these questions by travelling deep into the work and lives of some of the century's most original artists, among them Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, Edward Hopper, Henry Darger and Klaus Nomi. Part memoir, part biography, part dazzling work of cultural criticism, The Lonely City is not just a map, but a celebration of the state of loneliness. It's a voyage out to a strange and sometimes lovely island, adrift from the larger continent of human experience, but visited by many - millions, say - of souls"--

Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Thomas Piketty

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674979850

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 816

View: 7304

The main driver of inequality—returns on capital that exceed the rate of economic growth—is again threatening to generate extreme discontent and undermine democratic values. Thomas Piketty’s findings in this ambitious, original, rigorous work will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.

On Tyranny

Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century

Author: Timothy Snyder

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN: 0804190119

Category: Political Science

Page: 126

View: 9243

In previous books, Holocaust historian Timothy Snyder dissected the events and values that enabled the rise of Hitler and Stalin and the execution of their catastrophic policies. With Twenty Lessons, Snyder draws from the darkest hours of the twentieth century to provide hope for the twenty-first. As he writes, "Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism and communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience."

Forms of Enchantment

Writings on Art and Artists

Author: Marina Warner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500021460

Category:

Page: 288

View: 8004

An anthology of enlightening writing by an award-winning critic that engages with art in its social, political, and aesthetic contexts.

Painting Beyond Pollock

Author: Morgan Falconer

Publisher: Phaidon Press

ISBN: 9780714868776

Category: Art

Page: 384

View: 380

Painting Beyond Pollock is a captivating account of the history of European and American painting from the mid‐20th century onwards. Art historian and critic Morgan Falconer presents an extensively researched piece of writing that explains why painting has surged in popularity since Jackson Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists began painting in the late 1940s–early 1950s. Drawing on both original sources and contemporary scholarship, this bold and richly designed book lavishly illustrates the most important works made beginning in the Post War era. In addition to well‐known artists such as Willem de Kooning, Agnes Martin, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Marlene Dumas, Gerhard Richter and Brice Marden, Falconer explores the work of contemporary stars such as Cecily Brown, Mark Grotjahn, Elizabeth Peyton, John Currin, Neo Rauch and Mark Bradford as well as up‐and‐coming artists such as Blink Palermo and Sigmar Polke. Topics include: Things must be pulverized – Abstract Expressionism Wounded Painting – Informel in Europe and Beyond Against Gesture – Geometric Abstraction Witnesses – Post‐war Figurative Painting Anti&hyephn;Tradition – Pop Painting Post&hypen;Painting Part I – After Pollock A transcendental, high art – Neo‐Expressionism and its Discontents Post‐Painting Part II – After Pop New Figuration – Pop Romantics

Stoner

Author: John Williams

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590179285

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 6782

"Born the child of a poor farmer in Missouri, William Stoner is urged by his parents to study new agriculture techniques at the state university. Digging instead into the texts of Milton and Shakespeare, Stoner falls under the spell of the unexpected pleasures of English literature, and decides to make it his life. Stoner is the story of that life"--Publisher description (January 2007).

Medieval Modern

Art Out of Time

Author: Alexander Nagel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500238974

Category: Art

Page: 312

View: 5916

Rich collisions and fresh perspectives illuminate the profound continuities of thought and practice that have marked Western art through the ages

A Piece of the World

A Novel

Author: Christina Baker Kline

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062356283

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 1282

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "A must-read for anyone who loves history and art.” --Kristin Hannah From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the smash bestseller Orphan Train, a stunning and atmospheric novel of friendship, passion, and art, inspired by Andrew Wyeth’s mysterious and iconic painting Christina’s World. "Later he told me that he’d been afraid to show me the painting. He thought I wouldn’t like the way he portrayed me: dragging myself across the field, fingers clutching dirt, my legs twisted behind. The arid moonscape of wheatgrass and timothy. That dilapidated house in the distance, looming up like a secret that won’t stay hidden." To Christina Olson, the entire world was her family’s remote farm in the small coastal town of Cushing, Maine. Born in the home her family had lived in for generations, and increasingly incapacitated by illness, Christina seemed destined for a small life. Instead, for more than twenty years, she was host and inspiration for the artist Andrew Wyeth, and became the subject of one of the best known American paintings of the twentieth century. As she did in her beloved smash bestseller Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline interweaves fact and fiction in a powerful novel that illuminates a little-known part of America’s history. Bringing into focus the flesh-and-blood woman behind the portrait, she vividly imagines the life of a woman with a complicated relationship to her family and her past, and a special bond with one of our greatest modern artists. Told in evocative and lucid prose, A Piece of the World is a story about the burdens and blessings of family history, and how artist and muse can come together to forge a new and timeless legacy.

What Every Person Should Know About War

Author: Chris Hedges

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416583141

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 5509

Acclaimed New York Times journalist and author Chris Hedges offers a critical -- and fascinating -- lesson in the dangerous realities of our age: a stark look at the effects of war on combatants. Utterly lacking in rhetoric or dogma, this manual relies instead on bare fact, frank description, and a spare question-and-answer format. Hedges allows U.S. military documentation of the brutalizing physical and psychological consequences of combat to speak for itself. Hedges poses dozens of questions that young soldiers might ask about combat, and then answers them by quoting from medical and psychological studies. • What are my chances of being wounded or killed if we go to war? • What does it feel like to get shot? • What do artillery shells do to you? • What is the most painful way to get wounded? • Will I be afraid? • What could happen to me in a nuclear attack? • What does it feel like to kill someone? • Can I withstand torture? • What are the long-term consequences of combat stress? • What will happen to my body after I die? This profound and devastating portrayal of the horrors to which we subject our armed forces stands as a ringing indictment of the glorification of war and the concealment of its barbarity.

The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google

Author: Nicholas Carr

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393333949

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 6674

Offers predictions about the shift from private computer systems to Internet-based networks for computer-based businesses, and how the change will impact economics, culture, and society.

Antimodernism and Artistic Experience

Policing the Boundaries of Modernity

Author: Lynda Lee Jessup

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442655666

Category: Art

Page: 306

View: 5653

Antimodernism is a term used to describe the international reaction to the onslaught of the modern world that swept across industrialized Western Europe, North America, and Japan in the decades around the turn of the twentieth century. Scholars in art history, anthropology, political science, history, and feminist media studies explore antimodernism as an artistic response to a perceived sense of loss – in particular, the loss of 'authentic' experience. Embracing the 'authentic' as a redemptive antidote to the threat of unheralded economic and social change, antimodernism sought out experience supposedly embodied in pre-industrialized societies – in medieval communities or 'oriental cultures,' in the Primitive, the Traditional, or Folk. In describing the ways in which modern artists used antimodern constructs in formulating their work, the contributors examine the involvement of artists and intellectuals in the reproduction and diffusion of these concepts. In doing so they reveal the interrelation of fine art, decorative art, souvenir or tourist art, and craft, questioning the ways in which these categories of artistic expression reformulate and naturalise social relations in the field of cultural production.