The Wilderness Warrior

Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America

Author: Douglas Brinkley

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 960

View: 536

From New York Times bestselling historian Douglas Brinkley comes a sweeping historical narrative and eye-opening look at the pioneering environmental policies of President Theodore Roosevelt, avid bird-watcher, naturalist, and the founding father of America’s conservation movement. In this groundbreaking epic biography, Douglas Brinkley draws on never-before-published materials to examine the life and achievements of our “naturalist president.” By setting aside more than 230 million acres of wild America for posterity between 1901 and 1909, Theodore Roosevelt made conservation a universal endeavor. This crusade for the American wilderness was perhaps the greatest U.S. presidential initiative between the Civil War and World War I. Roosevelt’s most important legacies led to the creation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and passage of the Antiquities Act in 1906. His executive orders saved such treasures as Devils Tower, the Grand Canyon, and the Petrified Forest.

A Most Glorious Ride

The Diaries of Theodore Roosevelt, 1877–1886

Author: Edward P. Kohn

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 322

View: 632

Encompasses key years and important events in Theodore Roosevelt’s early life and career. A Most Glorious Ride presents the complete diaries of Theodore Roosevelt from 1877 to 1886. Covering the formative years of his life, Roosevelt’s entries show the transformation of a sickly and solitary Harvard freshman into a confident and increasingly robust young adult. He writes about his grief over the premature death of his father, his courtship and marriage to his first wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, and later the death of Alice and his mother on the same day. The diaries chronicle his burgeoning political career in New York City and his election to the New York State Assembly. With his descriptions of balls, dinner parties, and nights at the opera, they offer a glimpse into life among the Gilded Age elite in Boston and New York. They also recount Roosevelt’s first birding and hunting trips to the Adirondacks, the Maine woods, and the American West. Ending with Roosevelt’s secret engagement to his second wife, Edith Kermit Carow, A Most Glorious Ride provides an intimate look into the life of the man who would become America’s twenty-sixth president. Brought together for the first time in a single volume, the diaries have been meticulously transcribed, annotated, and introduced by Edward P. Kohn. Twenty-four black-and-white photographs are also included. “Edward P. Kohn has done scholars a great public service by editing the diaries of Theodore Roosevelt, 1877–1886. This volume is essential reading for anybody interested in the rise of the great Rough Rider. Highly recommended.” — Douglas Brinkley, author of The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America “I thought there was nothing new under the sun to be done on Theodore Roosevelt, given the thousands of books already published, but Edward P. Kohn has discovered, and admirably filled, a major gap in books on the life and times of TR. By bringing these diaries together in one place for the first time and providing expert annotation and footnotes, Kohn makes an extremely valuable contribution to understanding Roosevelt.” — Paul Grondahl, author of I Rose Like a Rocket: The Political Education of Theodore Roosevelt “A Most Glorious Ride is an outstanding addition not only to the scholarship on Roosevelt but also to the study of the Gilded Age, capturing the social norms of the times and offering insights into a long-gone era of family life.” — Michael Patrick Cullinane, author of Liberty and American Anti-Imperialism: 1898–1909

A Companion to Theodore Roosevelt

Author: Serge Ricard

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 143

A Companion to Theodore Roosevelt is the first comprehensive anthology to encompass Roosevelt as whole, highlighting both his personality and his skilled diplomacy. Revitalizes and internationalizes scholarship on this most popular and highly-rated American president Covers many aspects of Roosevelt’s personality and his policies, domestic and foreign, to create a complete picture of the man Provides scholarship from both sides of the Atlantic, from established Roosevelt specialists, respected scholars, and a new generation of historians A new and fresh historiographical exploration of Roosevelt’s life and ideas, political career and achievements, and his legacies

Theodore Roosevelt

Many-Sided American

Author: Natalie A. Naylor

Publisher: Heart of the Lakes Pub

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 676

View: 363

Barry Goldwater and the Remaking of the American Political Landscape

Author: Elizabeth Tandy Shermer

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 980

Nearly four million Americans worked on Barry Goldwater’s behalf in the presidential election of 1964. These citizens were as dedicated to their cause as those who fought for civil rights and against the Vietnam War. Arguably, the conservative agenda that began with Goldwater has had effects on American politics and society as profound and far reaching as the liberalism of the 1960s. According to the essays in this volume, it’s high time for a reconsideration of Barry Goldwater’s legacy. Since Goldwater’s death in 1998, politicians, pundits, and academics have been assessing his achievements and his shortcomings. The twelve essays in this volume thoroughly examine the life, times, and impact of “Mr. Conservative.” Scrutinizing the transformation of a Phoenix department store owner into a politician, de facto political philosopher, and five-time US senator, contributors highlight the importance of power, showcasing the relationship between the nascent conservative movement’s cadre of elite businessmen, newsmen, and intellectuals and their followers at the grassroots—or sagebrush—level. Goldwater, who was born in the Arizona Territory in 1909, was deeply influenced by his Western upbringing. With his appearance on the national stage in 1964, he not only articulated a new brand of conservatism but gave a voice to many Americans who were not enamored with the social and political changes of the era. He may have lost the battle for the presidency, but he energized a coalition of journalists, publishers, women’s groups, and Southerners to band together in a movement that reshaped the nation.

One Hundred People who Changed 20th-century America

Author: Mary Cross

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

View: 525

To what extent does a person's own success result in social transformation? This book offers 100 answers, providing thought-provoking examples of how American culture was shaped within a crucial time period by individuals whose lives and ideas were major agents of change.

Bully!

The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt: Illustrated with More Than 250 Vintage Political Cartoons

Author: Rick Marschall

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 736

One of America’s most beloved presidents comes to life in this comprehensive, unique biography illustrated by more than 250 period cartoons. Theodore Roosevelt, adored for everything from his much-caricatured teeth and glasses to his almost childlike exuberance and boundless energy, as well as his astounding achievements, captivated Americans of his day—and the cartoonists who immortalized him in their drawings. In Bully! The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt, author and cartoonist Rick Marschall tells Roosevelt’s story, using words and colorful images alike. Incorporating hundreds of vintage illustrations, Bully! captures Roosevelt’s remarkable life and incredible accomplishments as no other biography has.

FDR and the Creation of the U.N.

Author: Townsend Hoopes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 131

In this comprehensive account, two prize-winning historians explain how the idea of the United Nations was conceived, debated, and revised, first within the U.S. government and then by negotiation with its major allies in World War II. 28 illustrations.

Jack London: An American Life

Author: Earle Labor

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 339

A revelatory look at the life of the great American author—and how it shaped his most beloved works Jack London was born a working class, fatherless Californian in 1876. In his youth, he was a boundlessly energetic adventurer on the bustling West Coast—an oyster pirate, a hobo, a sailor, and a prospector by turns. He spent his brief life rapidly accumulating the experiences that would inform his acclaimed bestselling books The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and The Sea-Wolf. The bare outlines of his story suggest a classic rags-to-riches tale, but London the man was plagued by contradictions. He chronicled nature at its most savage, but wept helplessly at the deaths of his favorite animals. At his peak the highest paid writer in the United States, he was nevertheless forced to work under constant pressure for money. An irrepressibly optimistic crusader for social justice and a lover of humanity, he was also subject to spells of bitter invective, especially as his health declined. Branded by shortsighted critics as little more than a hack who produced a couple of memorable dog stories, he left behind a voluminous literary legacy, much of it ripe for rediscovery. In Jack London: An American Life, the noted Jack London scholar Earle Labor explores the brilliant and complicated novelist lost behind the myth—at once a hard-living globe-trotter and a man alive with ideas, whose passion for seeking new worlds to explore never waned until the day he died. Returning London to his proper place in the American pantheon, Labor resurrects a major American novelist in his full fire and glory.

The Searchers

The Making of an American Legend

Author: Glenn Frankel

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 522

In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. She was raised by the tribe and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years after her capture, she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and Texas Rangers and restored to her white family, to die in misery and obscurity. Cynthia Ann's story has been told and re-told over generations to become a foundational American tale. The myth gave rise to operas and one-act plays, and in the 1950s to a novel by Alan LeMay, which would be adapted into one of Hollywood's most legendary films, The Searchers, "The Biggest, Roughest, Toughest... and Most Beautiful Picture Ever Made!" directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. Glenn Frankel, beginning in Hollywood and then returning to the origins of the story, creates a rich and nuanced anatomy of a timeless film and a quintessentially American myth. The dominant story that has emerged departs dramatically from documented history: it is of the inevitable triumph of white civilization, underpinned by anxiety about the sullying of white women by "savages." What makes John Ford's film so powerful, and so important, Frankel argues, is that it both upholds that myth and undermines it, baring the ambiguities surrounding race, sexuality, and violence in the settling of the West and the making of America.