The Underground History of American Education

A Schoolteacher's Intimate Investigation Into the Problem of Modern Schooling

Author: John Taylor Gatto

Publisher: Odysseus Group

ISBN: 9780945700043

Category: Education

Page: 412

View: 2097

The underground history of the American education will take you on a journey into the background, philosophy, psychology, politics, and purposes of compulsion schooling.

The Underground History of American Education, Volume I

An Intimate Investigation Into the Prison of Modern Schooling

Author: John Taylor Gatto

Publisher: Valor Academy

ISBN: 9780998919102

Category: Education

Page: 263

View: 3805

"The World's Most Courageous Teacher" reveals the inner circle secrets of the American school system. The legendary schoolteacher, John Taylor Gatto, invested over 10 years of dedicated research to uncover some of the most alarming ideas and writings by the creators and advocates of mandatory attendance schooling, which show where the system came from and why it was created. He combined these facts with his personal experience as a teacher for 30 years in New York public schools, where he won many awards, including being named State Teacher of the Year twice, and has authored an all-time classic. This book was originally published in 2001, and has been printed a number of times. However, this updated version includes new essays from the author, as well as contributions from Dr. Ron Paul, David Ruenzel, and Richard Grove. This is the first of a 3 book volume which will help the reader gain a solid understanding about the American school organization and many of the hidden, yet powerful parts. In this first of set, Mr. Gatto's humble yet bold personality, mixed with humor and class, makes it an enjoyable read, despite the importance and implications of the subject. Mr. Gatto says, "It's time to take our schools back. If they mean to have a war, let it begin now."

Weapons of Mass Instruction

A Schoolteacher's Journey Through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling

Author: John Taylor Gatto

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN: 1550924249

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 1553

The transformation of schooling from a twelve-year jail sentence to freedom to learn.

Dumbing Us Down

The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling

Author: John Taylor Gatto

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN: 1550923013

Category: Education

Page: 144

View: 4837

A new look for a radical bestseller!

A Different Kind of Teacher

Solving the Crisis of American Schooling

Author: John Taylor Gatto

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781893163409

Category: Education

Page: 230

View: 7032

"In A Different Kind of Teacher, John Gatto opens readers' eyes to what the American system of education really is, what it ought to be, and what steps can be taken to reach that goal."--BOOK JACKET.

Principles of Secondary Education

Author: Alexander James Inglis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education, Secondary

Page: 741

View: 912

Democracy's Schools

The Rise of Public Education in America

Author: Johann N. Neem

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421423219

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 8947

At a time when Americans are debating the future of public education, Johann N. Neem tells the inspiring story of how and why Americans built a robust public school system in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. It’s a story in which ordinary people in towns across the country worked together to form districts and build schoolhouses and reformers sought to expand tax support and give every child a liberal education. By the time of the Civil War, most northern states had made common schools free, and many southern states were heading in the same direction. Americans made schooling a public good. Yet back then, like today, Americans disagreed over the kind of education needed, who should pay for it, and how schools should be governed. Neem explores the history and meaning of these disagreements. As Americans debated, teachers and students went about the daily work of teaching and learning. Neem takes us into the classrooms of yore so that we may experience public schools from the perspective of the people whose daily lives were most affected by them. Ultimately, Neem concludes, public schools encouraged a diverse people to see themselves as one nation. By studying the origins of America’s public schools, Neem urges us to focus on the defining features of democratic education: promoting equality, nurturing human beings, preparing citizens, and fostering civic solidarity.

Necessary Illusions

Thought Control in Democratic Societies

Author: Noam Chomsky

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 0887848680

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 5700

In his national bestselling 1988 CBC Massey Lectures, Noam Chomsky inquires into the nature of the media in a political system where the population cannot be disciplined by force and thus must be subjected to more subtle forms of ideological control. Specific cases are illustrated in detail, using the U.S. media primarily but also media in other societies. Chomsky considers how the media might be democratized (as part of the general problem of developing more democratic institutions) in order to offer citizens broader and more meaningful participation in social and political life.

The End of School

Reclaiming Education from the Classroom

Author: Zachary T. Slayback

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781530462544

Category:

Page: 278

View: 8700

School is a pervasive element in our lives - but one that goes mostly unquestioned. Most discussions get caught up in details of policy reform and leave the idea of school itself alone. The End of School changes that. Offering a radical, but even-handed, look at the purpose of education and the reality of school, Slayback develops a manifesto for how young people, parents, educators, and employers can move beyond school and take control of education. Slayback -- an entrepreneur and Ivy League dropout -- talks about his own disenchantment with school. Despite being an excellent student and loving learning, he became convinced that school was not achieving its end of providing the best education possible. Other students, business partners, intellectuals, and parents convinced him along the way. The End of School is a look -- both theoretical and practical -- at how to fix that. Slayback addresses the book to students, educators, parents, and employers of all stripes and ages. Whether you're a high school or college student, a recent graduate, a parent of a young person, a teacher, or an entrepreneur, you'll want to pick up The End of School. Some of the topics explored include: - The Purpose of Education - The Purpose of School - The Reality of School - Different Types of Schooling - The Effects of Schooling on Your Future - How to Reverse the Negative Effects of Schooling - How to Take Control of Your Education Outside of School - How to Succeed Without a College Degree - Entrepreneurship vs. School as the Ideal Education And more!

My (Underground) American Dream

My True Story as an Undocumented Immigrant Who Became a Wall Street Executive

Author: Julissa Arce

Publisher: Center Street

ISBN: 1455540250

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 5352

What does an undocumented immigrant look like? What kind of family must she come from? How could she get into this country? What is the true price she must pay to remain in the United States? JULISSA ARCE knows firsthand that the most common, preconceived answers to those questions are sometimes far too simple-and often just plain wrong. On the surface, Arce's story reads like a how-to manual for achieving the American dream: growing up in an apartment on the outskirts of San Antonio, she worked tirelessly, achieved academic excellence, and landed a coveted job on Wall Street, complete with a six-figure salary. The level of professional and financial success that she achieved was the very definition of the American dream. But in this brave new memoir, Arce digs deep to reveal the physical, financial, and emotional costs of the stunning secret that she, like many other high-achieving, successful individuals in the United States, had been forced to keep not only from her bosses, but even from her closest friends. From the time she was brought to this country by her hardworking parents as a child, Arce-the scholarship winner, the honors college graduate, the young woman who climbed the ladder to become a vice president at Goldman Sachs-had secretly lived as an undocumented immigrant. In this surprising, at times heart-wrenching, but always inspirational personal story of struggle, grief, and ultimate redemption, Arce takes readers deep into the little-understood world of a generation of undocumented immigrants in the United States today- people who live next door, sit in your classrooms, work in the same office, and may very well be your boss. By opening up about the story of her successes, her heartbreaks, and her long-fought journey to emerge from the shadows and become an American citizen, Arce shows us the true cost of achieving the American dream-from the perspective of a woman who had to scale unseen and unimaginable walls to get there.

Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Author: Eric Foner

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393244385

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 2849

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Stamped from the Beginning

The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Author: Ibram X. Kendi

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 1568584644

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 6100

A searing history of how racist ideas were created, disseminated, and entrenched in America Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Chicago Review of Books, The Root, Buzzfeed, Bustle, and Entropy "The most ambitious book of 2016."-The Washington Post Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.

The Teenage Liberation Handbook

How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education

Author: Grace Llewellyn

Publisher: Element Books Limited

ISBN: 9781862041042

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 285

View: 9386

Explores how teenagers can leave school and design a personalized education program for themselves

Fundamentalist U

Keeping the Faith in American Higher Education

Author: Adam Laats

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190665629

Category: Education

Page: 360

View: 8292

Why do so many conservative politicians flock to the campuses of Liberty University, Wheaton College, and Bob Jones University? In Fundamentalist U: Keeping the Faith in American Higher Education, Adam Laats shows that these colleges have always been more than just schools; they have beenvital intellectual citadels in America's culture wars. They have been unique institutions that have defined what it has meant to be an evangelical and reshaped the landscape of American higher education. In the twentieth century, when higher education sometimes seemed to focus on sports, science, and social excess, conservative evangelical schools offered a compelling alternative. On their campuses, evangelicals debated what it meant to be a creationist, a Christian, a proper American, all withinthe bounds of Biblical revelation. Instead of encouraging greater personal freedom and deeper pluralist values, conservative evangelical schools have thrived by imposing stricter rules on their students and faculty.If we hope to understand either American higher education or American evangelicalism, we need to understand this influential network of dissenting institutions. Plus, only by making sense of these schools can we make sense of America's continuing culture wars. After all, our culture wars aren'tbetween one group of educated people and another group that has not been educated. Rather, the fight is usually fiercest between two groups that have been educated in very different ways.

Underground America

Narratives of Undocumented Lives

Author: Peter Orner

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1786632268

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 4760

Millions of immigrants risk deportation and imprisonment by living in the US without legal status. They are living underground, with little protection from exploitation at the hands of human smugglers, employers, or law enforcement. Underground America presents the remarkable oral histories of men and women struggling to carve a life for themselves in the US.

College Without High School

A Teenager's Guide to Skipping High School and Going to College

Author: Blake Boles

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN: 1550924362

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 4586

Because the real world is the best education.

An African American and Latinx History of the United States

Author: Paul Ortiz

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807013102

Category: HISTORY

Page: 276

View: 947

"Spanning more than two hundred years, An African American and Latinx History of the United States is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the "Global South" was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy, " and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism. Drawing on rich narratives and primary source documents, Ortiz links racial segregation in the Southwest and the rise and violent fall of a powerful tradition of Mexican labor organizing in the twentieth century, to May 1, 2006, known as International Workers' Day, when migrant laborers--Chicana/os, Afrocubanos, and immigrants from every continent on earth--united in resistance on the first "Day Without Immigrants." As African American civil rights activists fought against Jim Crow laws and Mexican labor organizers warred against the suffocating grip of capitalism, Black and Spanish-language newspapers, abolitionists, and Latin American revolutionaries coalesced around movements built between people from the United States and people from Central America and the Caribbean. And in stark contrast to the resurgence of "America first" rhetoric, Black and Latinx intellectuals and organizers today have urged the United States to build bridges of solidarity with the nations of the America. Incisive and timely, this bottom-up history, told from the interconnected vantage points of Latinx and African Americas, reveals the radically different ways that people of the diaspora have addressed issues still plaguing the United States today, and it offers a way forward in the continued struggle for universal civil rights."--Dust jacket.

The Lost Education of Horace Tate

Uncovering the Hidden Heroes Who Fought for Justice in Schools

Author: Vanessa Siddle Walker

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620971062

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 3143

★ “This well-told and inspiring tale, with its rarely discussed angle on the school segregation fight, will draw in readers interested in meaningful work and activism, or just a well-told tale.” —Publisher Weekly (Starred Review) In the epic tradition of Eyes on the Prize and with the cultural significance of John Lewis’s March trilogy, an ambitious and harrowing account of the devoted black educators who battled southern school segregation and inequality For two years an aging Dr. Horace Tate—a former teacher, principal, and state senator—told Emory University professor Vanessa Siddle Walker about his clandestine travels on unpaved roads under the cover of night, meeting with other educators and with Dr. King, Georgia politicians, and even U.S. presidents. Sometimes he and Walker spoke by phone, sometimes in his office, sometimes in his home; always Tate shared fascinating stories of the times leading up to and following Brown v. Board of Education. Dramatically, on his deathbed, he asked Walker to return to his office in Atlanta, in a building that was once the headquarters of another kind of southern strategy, one driven by integrity and equality. Just days after Dr. Tate’s passing in 2002, Walker honored his wish. Up a dusty, rickety staircase, locked in a concealed attic, she found the collection: a massive archive documenting the underground actors and covert strategies behind the most significant era of the fight for educational justice. Thus began Walker’s sixteen-year project to uncover the network of educators behind countless battles—in courtrooms, schools, and communities—for the education of black children. Until now, the courageous story of how black Americans in the South won so much and subsequently fell so far has been incomplete. The Lost Education of Horace Tate is a monumental work that offers fresh insight into the southern struggle for human rights, revealing little-known accounts of leaders such as W.E.B. Du Bois and James Weldon Johnson, as well as hidden provocateurs like Horace Tate.