Tonga

A New Bibliography

Author: Martin Daly

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 220

Praise for the first edition: Tonga is unique among bibliographies in its perception and understanding, and in its affection for Tonga and its people. . . . Daly s work stands on exceptionally sound foundations. . . . His summaries are excellent, indeed, but Daly writes always with the authority of first-hand knowledge, with a keen eye for the essential, and the ability to interpret and clarify obscurities. . . . A trustworthy introduction to Tonga in all its diversity, a splendid point de depart for all, layman or scholar, needing a reliable guide to the essential literature about this remarkable Polynesian kingdom. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies The book is so arranged that it is easy to locate any of the items listed. . . . I found myself spending pleasant hours perusing Daly s comments on the different publications.. . . I hope the rumor of a second, revised edition of this bibliography is true. Journal of the Polynesian Society Tonga is a fascinating and subtle combination of a traditional Polynesian kingdom the only one to survive the impact of colonization in the nineteenth century and remain independent and a thoroughly Christian country. This comprehensive bibliography is a selective guide to the most significant and accessible English-language books, papers, and articles on every aspect of the kingdom s history, culture, arts, politics, environment, and economy. It is a much updated and expanded edition of the original version that was published in 1999 as part of the World Bibliographical Series, with the addition of more than 200 new entries. Each of the approximately 600 described and annotated items is organized under broad subject headings, and indexed by author, title, and subject. In addition and new to this edition all known Ph.D. theses, although not annotated, are shown within their appropriate subject categories and indexed. Also new is a section on the most important Tonga-related websites. A general introduction describes the Tongan kingdom, its history and society, and its current situation. Tonga: A New Bibliography will be an invaluable resource for anyone with a serious interest in Tonga and an indispensable volume for academic libraries, reference collections, and policy makers focused on the Pacific islands. "

Historical Dictionary of Polynesia

Author: Robert D. Craig

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 430

Features entries on political, historical, and social topics that have defined Polynesia's thirteen island states, in addition to significant figures, places, rituals, and organizations.

Social Structure, Space and Possession in Tongan Culture and Language

An ethnolinguistic study

Author: Svenja Völkel

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 675

This interdisciplinary study investigates the relationship between culture, language and cognition based on the aspects of social structure, space and possession in Tonga, Polynesia. Grounded on extensive field research, Völkel explores the subject from an anthropological as well as from a linguistic perspective. The book provides new insights into the language of respect, an honorific system which is deeply anchored in the societal hierarchy, spatial descriptions that are determined by socio-cultural and geocentric parameters, kinship terminology and possessive categories that perfectly express the system of social status inequalities among relatives. These examples impressively show that language is deeply anchored in its cultural context. Moreover, the linguistic structures reflect the underlying cognitive frame of its speakers. Just as several cultural practices (sitting order, access to land and gift exchange processes) the linguistic means are not only expressions of stratified social networks but also tools to maintain or negotiate the underlying socio-cultural system.

Tamai

The Life Story of John Hartley Roberts of Tonga. With an Account of Tongan Affairs from the Native Side, Not Hitherto Published

Author: Samuel Cuthbert Roberts

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: College administrators

Page: 176

View: 923

Oceania

Author: Alfred Reginald Radcliffe-Brown

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ethnology

Page:

View: 784

Includes the sections "Reviews" and "Bibliographical notes."

Borrowing

A Pacific Perspective

Author: Jan Tent

Publisher: Pacific Linguistics

ISBN:

Category: Oceanic languages

Page: 330

View: 883

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in linguistic borrowing, especially with regard to its importance in the reconstruction of pre-history. However, the general literature on borrowing has been based on a somewhat restricted range of data, tending to concentrate on the languages of Europe or the Americas. The Pacific has not figured prominently in such discussions.Linguists and anthropologists have long considered the Pacific to be a kind of laboratory because the geographical discreteness of its cultures allows clearer inferences to be made than are usually possible in a continental situation. Borrowing in the Pacific is relatively easy to identify and stratify. Its study is, therefore, especially useful in the reconstruction of the linguistic, social and cultural history. The scope of this volume is not solely restricted to borrowing in Oceanic languages, but includes two papers on borrowing in Fiji Hindi and Fiji English. Authors have been encouraged to address general issues of borrowing from the perspective of data they have derived from their fieldwork, thus avoiding the risk of producing a series of largely similar contributions. The volume also includes a number of seminal and authoritative papers on Pacific borrowing that have been previously published.

Tongans Overseas

Between Two Shores

Author: Helen Morton Lee

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 326

View: 584

Since the late 1960s Tongans have been leaving their islands in large numbers and settling in many different nations. Tongans Overseas is a timely look at their settlement experiences as they relate to cultural identity, particularly among the younger generations raised outside Tonga. What does being Tongan mean to these young people? Why do some proudly proclaim and cherish their Tongan identities while others remain ambivalent, confused, or indifferent? Helen Morton Lee's innovative research offers insights into these and many other questions, revealing the complexities of identity construction in the context of migration and the varied ways in which individuals seek a sense of belonging. Using both traditional ethnographic fieldwork and newly popular Internet discussion forums, where young Tongans speak their minds and describe their experiences, Lee has produced the most comprehensive study of Tongan migrants to date. Throughout the book diasporic Tongans speak eloquently about their lives, and case studies of families and individuals bring the analysis to life. Lee explores tensions within overseas communities, especially the intergenerational conflicts that are contributing to the alienation of many young Tongans today.