The Spirit Level

Why Equality is Better for Everyone

Author: Kate Pickett

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 876

Why do we mistrust people more in the UK than in Japan? Why do Americans have higher rates of teenage pregnancy than the French? What makes the Swedish thinner than the Greeks? The answer: inequality. This groundbreaking book, based on years of research, provides hard evidence to show: - How almost everything - from life expectancy to depression levels, violence to illiteracy - is affected not by how wealthy a society is, but how equal it is - That societies with a bigger gap between rich and poor are bad for everyone in them - including the well-off - How we can find positive solutions and move towards a happier, fairer future Urgent, provocative and genuinely uplifting, The Spirit Level has been heralded as providing a new way of thinking about ourselves and our communities, and could change the way you see the world.

The Spirit Level

Why Equality is Better for Everyone

Author: Richard G. Wilkinson

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Equality

Page: 346

View: 906

Why do we mistrust people more in the UK than in Japan? Why do Americans have higher rates of teenage pregnancy than the French? What makes the Swedish thinner than the Greeks? The answer: inequality.This groundbreaking book, based on years of research, provides hard evidence to show:- How almost everything - from life expectancy to depression levels, violence to illiteracy - is affected not by how wealthy a society is, but how equal it is- That societies with a bigger gap between rich and poor are bad for everyone in them - including the well-off- How we can find positive solutions and move towards a happier, fairer futureUrgent, provocative and genuinely uplifting, The Spirit Level has been heralded as providing a new way of thinking about ourselves and our communities, and could change the way you see the world.

The Spirit Level

Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better

Author: Frederic P. Miller

Publisher: Alphascript Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 148

View: 808

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better is a book by Richard G. Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, published in 2009. This book is also published in the US by Bloomsbury Press (December, 2009) with new sub-title: why greater equality makes societies stronger. It was then published in a paperback second edition in the UK in February 2010 with the different sub-title, "Why Equality is Better for Everyone", which included an Appendix of some of the statistical data which had previously only been available on the Equality Trust website. The book claims that there are pernicious effects that inequality has on societies: eroding trust, increasing anxiety and illness, (and) encouraging excessive consumption. It claims that for each of eleven different health and social problems: physical health, mental health, drug abuse, education, imprisonment, obesity, social mobility, trust and community life, violence, teenage pregnancies, and child well-being, outcomes are substantially worse in more unequal rich countries.

A Question of Inequality

The Politics of Equal Worth

Author: Christopher Steed

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 660

Inequality is widening. In the twenty-first century, the gap between those who have more and those who have less is growing: 1 per cent of the world owns as much as the other 99 per cent. Should we be worried? Christopher Steed, author of the acclaimed A Question of Worth, argues that inequality does indeed matter: that economic fairness is one of the defining issues of our time. In a world conditioned by social media, enabling intensified social comparison, the anxieties and effects of contemporary inequality are a cause for huge concern. Despite a wealth of research around inequality most studies have concentrated on its quantitative aspects. In A Question of Inequality, Christopher Steed is concerned with exploring why inequality matters, what it means for those who find themselves victims of it, and what can be done about it. He probes what it means to experience inequality, drawing out case studies on the effects of poverty. In proposing a theory of social relativity the author provides new insights into the effects and meaning of inequality and makes an original and important contribution to a key issue facing the world today.

Fundamentals of Health Promotion for Nurses

Author: Jane Wills

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 376

View: 643

Fundamentals of Health Promotion for Nurses is a concise, accessible introduction to health promotion and public health for pre-registration nursing students and newly qualified nurses. Promoting the health and wellbeing of patients is a vital part of the nursing role, and the updated second edition of this user-friendly book discusses the foundations for health promotion practice using practical examples, activities and discussion points to encourage readers to reflect on their values, debate the issues and apply their knowledge and understanding to practice.

Democracy under attack

How the Media Distort Policy and Politics

Author: Malcolm Dean

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 525

View: 152

Drawing on four decades of top-level Whitehall briefings and interviews with one-hundred fifty policy makers, Malcolm Dean, chief monitor of social affairs for the UK Guardian, uses seven case studies to examine the mass media in Britain and its influence on social policy.--Adapted from publisher description.

Christianity and the New Social Order

A Manifesto for a Fairer Society

Author: John Atherton

Publisher: SPCK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 806

Is Britain a broken society? Written in accessible language that speaks directly into church, public sphere and also academy it enters the current political, economic and social policy/civil society debates concerning the values and directions of British society. It covers religion and the public square, wellbeing and happiness in the public square, the new economics, faiths and social welfare, a new political manifesto.

Harperism

How Stephen Harper and his think tank colleagues have transformed Canada

Author: Donald Gutstein

Publisher: James Lorimer & Company

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 560

Margaret Thatcher transformed British political life forever. So did Ronald Reagan in the United States. Now Canada has experienced a similar, dramatic shift to a new kind of politics, which author Donald Gustein terms Harperism. Among its key tenets: A weakened labour movement--and preferably the disappearance of unions--will contribute to Canada's economic prosperityCutting back government scientific research and data collection will improve public policy-makingEliminating First Nations reserves by converting them to private property will improve conditions of life for aboriginal peoplesInequality of incomes and wealth is a good thing--and Canada needs more of it These and other essential elements of Harperism flow from neo-liberal economic theories propounded by the Austrian economist Friedrich von Hayek and his U.S. disciples. They inspired Thatcherism and Reaganism. Stephen Harper has taken this neo-liberalism much further in many key areas. As Donald Gutstein shows, Harper has successfully used a strategy of incremental change coupled with denial of the underlying neo-liberal analysis that explains these hard-to-understand measures. The success of Harperism is no accident. Donald Gutstein documents the links between the politicians, think tanks, journalists, academics, and researchers who nurture and promote each other's neo-liberal ideas. They do so using funds provided by ultra-rich U.S. donors, by Canadian billionaires like Peter Munk, and by many big corporations--all of whom stand to gain from the ideas and policies the Harperites develop and push. This book casts new light on the last ten years of Canadian politics. It documents the challenges that Harperism--with or without Stephen Harper--will continue to offer to the many Canadians who do not share this pro-market world view.

The Almost Nearly Perfect People

Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia

Author: Michael Booth

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 416

View: 616

The Danes are the happiest people in the world, and pay the highest taxes. 'Neutral' Sweden is one of the biggest arms manufacturers in the world. Finns have the largest per capita gun ownership after the US and Yemen. 54 per cent of Icelanders believe in elves. Norway is the richest country on earth. 5 per cent of Danish men have had sex with an animal. Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians, on and off, for over ten years, perplexed by their many strange paradoxes and character traits and equally bemused by the unquestioning enthusiasm for all things Nordic and hygge that has engulfed the rest of the world. He leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success and, most intriguing of all, what they think of each other. Along the way a more nuanced, often darker picture emerges of a region plagued by taboos, characterised by suffocating parochialism and populated by extremists of various shades. 'The next Bill Bryson.’ New York Times Winner of the Best Narrative Travel Book Award from the British Guild of Travel Writers

The Burning Question

We can't burn half the world's oil, coal and gas. So how do we quit?

Author: Mike Berners-Lee

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 403

View: 207

The Burning Question reveals climate change to be the most fascinating scientific, political and social puzzle in history. It shows that carbon emissions are still accelerating upwards, following an exponential curve that goes back centuries. One reason is that saving energy is like squeezing a balloon: reductions in one place lead to increases elsewhere. Another reason is that clean energy sources don't in themselves slow the rate of fossil fuel extraction. Tackling global warming will mean persuading the world to abandon oil, coal and gas reserves worth many trillions of dollars - at least until we have the means to put carbon back in the ground. The burning question is whether that can be done. What mix of politics, psychology, economics and technology might be required? Are the energy companies massively overvalued, and how will carbon-cuts affect the global economy? Will we wake up to the threat in time? And who can do what to make it all happen?