The Shape of the River

Long-term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions

Author: William G. Bowen,Derek Curtis Bok,James Lawrence Shulman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780691050195

Category: Education

Page: 472

View: 1547

A groundbreaking study of the nature, effectiveness, and long-term consequences of race-sensitive admission policies in colleges and universities analyzes students' personal histories before and after college, offering findings greatly affecting the national debate on this issue. Tour. UP.

Locus of Authority

The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education

Author: William G. Bowen,Eugene M. Tobin

Publisher: William G. Bowen Memorial Seri

ISBN: 9780691175669

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 8062

Do higher education institutions have what it takes to reform effectively from within? Locus of Authority argues that every issue facing today's colleges and universities, from stagnant degree completion rates to worrisome cost increases, is exacerbated by a century-old system of governance that desperately requires change. While prior studies have focused on boards of trustees and presidents, few have looked at the place of faculty within the governance system. Bowen and Tobin explore whether departments remain the best ways through which to organize decision making and if the concepts of academic freedom and shared governance need to be sharpened and redefined. Using case studies of four very different institutions, the authors demonstrate that college and university governance has capably adjusted to the necessities of the moment and governance norms and policies should be assessed in the context of historical events. They also demonstrate that successful reform depends on the artful consideration of technological, financial, and cultural developments. Locus of Authority shows that the consequences of not addressing college and university governance are more than the nation can afford.

The Game of Life

College Sports and Educational Values

Author: James L. Shulman,William G. Bowen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691096198

Category: Education

Page: 496

View: 4498

The President of Williams College faces a firestorm for not allowing the women's lacrosse team to postpone exams to attend the playoffs. The University of Michigan loses $2.8 million on athletics despite averaging 110,000 fans at each home football game. Schools across the country struggle with the tradeoffs involved with recruiting athletes and updating facilities for dozens of varsity sports. Does increasing intensification of college sports support or detract from higher education's core mission? James Shulman and William Bowen introduce facts into a terrain overrun by emotions and enduring myths. Using the same database that informed The Shape of the River, the authors analyze data on 90,000 students who attended thirty selective colleges and universities in the 1950s, 1970s, and 1990s. Drawing also on historical research and new information on giving and spending, the authors demonstrate how athletics influence the class composition and campus ethos of selective schools, as well as the messages that these institutions send to prospective students, their parents, and society at large. Shulman and Bowen show that athletic programs raise even more difficult questions of educational policy for small private colleges and highly selective universities than they do for big-time scholarship-granting schools. They discover that today's athletes, more so than their predecessors, enter college less academically well-prepared and with different goals and values than their classmates--differences that lead to different lives. They reveal that gender equity efforts have wrought large, sometimes unanticipated changes. And they show that the alumni appetite for winning teams is not--as schools often assume--insatiable. If a culprit emerges, it is the unquestioned spread of a changed athletic culture through the emulation of highly publicized teams by low-profile sports, of men's programs by women's, and of athletic powerhouses by small colleges. Shulman and Bowen celebrate the benefits of collegiate sports, while identifying the subtle ways in which athletic intensification can pull even prestigious institutions from their missions. By examining how athletes and other graduates view The Game of Life--and how colleges shape society's view of what its rules should be--Bowen and Shulman go far beyond sports. They tell us about higher education today: the ways in which colleges set policies, reinforce or neglect their core mission, and send signals about what matters.

Our Underachieving Colleges

A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More

Author: Derek Bok

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691136189

Category: Education

Page: 429

View: 3411

The author sets forth what is known about how much students learn in college, gives recommendations for how to improve undergraduate education, and describes how universities can develop a continuing process of enlightened trial and error that will enable them to improve their performance in the future.

Higher Education in the Digital Age

Author: William G. Bowen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691159300

Category: Education

Page: 172

View: 4823

Surveys the impact of new technology on higher education and examines whether improved technology has the capacity to rein in the exploding costs of education without negatively affecting student learning.

The Source of the River

The Social Origins of Freshmen at America's Selective Colleges and Universities

Author: Douglas S. Massey,Camille Z. Charles,Garvey Lundy,Mary J. Fischer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400840762

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 9356

African Americans and Latinos earn lower grades and drop out of college more often than whites or Asians. Yet thirty years after deliberate minority recruitment efforts began, we still don't know why. In The Shape of the River, William Bowen and Derek Bok documented the benefits of affirmative action for minority students, their communities, and the nation at large. But they also found that too many failed to achieve academic success. In The Source of the River, Douglas Massey and his colleagues investigate the roots of minority underperformance in selective colleges and universities. They explain how such factors as neighborhood, family, peer group, and early schooling influence the academic performance of students from differing racial and ethnic origins and differing social classes. Drawing on a major new source of data--the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshmen--the authors undertake a comprehensive analysis of the diverse pathways by which whites, African Americans, Latinos, and Asians enter American higher education. Theirs is the first study to document the different characteristics that students bring to campus and to trace out the influence of these differences on later academic performance. They show that black and Latino students do not enter college disadvantaged by a lack of self-esteem. In fact, overconfidence is more common than low self-confidence among some minority students. Despite this, minority students are adversely affected by racist stereotypes of intellectual inferiority. Although academic preparation is the strongest predictor of college performance, shortfalls in academic preparation are themselves largely a matter of socioeconomic disadvantage and racial segregation. Presenting important new findings, The Source of the River documents the ongoing power of race to shape the life chances of America's young people, even among the most talented and able.

Ever the Leader

Selected Writings, 1995-2016

Author: William G. Bowen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888921

Category: Education

Page: 360

View: 8230

Ever the Leader gathers together selected speeches and writings from one of the great scholars and commentators of higher education. William G. Bowen’s career at Princeton University—from economics professor to provost to a sixteen-year tenure as president—was marked by extraordinary accomplishments during times of great change, both at the university and in the country. But it was in Bowen’s second act, as president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and founding chairman of ITHAKA, that he took the lessons he learned as a highly productive leader of one of the nation’s most esteemed universities and applied them to a broader set of problems in higher education. This volume of work from Bowen’s later career captures this expansion of his thought and influence. Comprising remarks and articles on the subjects of university values, educational opportunity, college sports, technology, and colleagues and peers in higher education leadership, Ever the Leader is more than just a concise distillation of Bowen’s research and thinking on some of the most urgent issues of the day—it is a portrait of leadership in action. The selected papers, talks, and articles exemplify Bowen’s commitment and singular ability to communicate strong, persuasive arguments for change, and to motivate others to engage with the truly hard questions facing higher education leaders. Filled with formidable insights, Ever the Leader will be required reading for university presidents, policymakers, and all those who carry on the struggle for equity and excellence in higher education.

Lesson Plan

An Agenda for Change in American Higher Education

Author: William G. Bowen,Michael S. McPherson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780691178455

Category:

Page: 184

View: 1007

American higher education faces some serious problems--but they are not the ones most people think. In this brief and accessible book, two leading experts show that many so-called crises--from the idea that typical students are drowning in debt to the belief that tuition increases are being driven by administrative bloat--are exaggerated or simply false. At the same time, many real problems--from the high dropout rate to inefficient faculty staffing--have received far too little attention. In response, William G. Bowen and Michael S. McPherson provide a frank assessment of the biggest challenges confronting higher education and propose a bold agenda for reengineering essential elements of the system to meet them. The result promises to help shape the debate about higher education for years to come. Lesson Plan shows that, for all of its accomplishments, higher education today is falling short when it comes to vital national needs. Too many undergraduates are dropping out or taking too long to graduate; minorities and the poor fare worse than their peers, reinforcing inequality; and college is unaffordable for too many. But these problems could be greatly reduced by making significant changes, including targeting federal and state funding more efficiently; allocating less money for "merit aid" and more to match financial need; creating a respected "teaching corps" that would include nontenure faculty; improving basic courses in fields such as math by combining adaptive learning and face-to-face teaching; strengthening leadership; and encouraging more risk taking. It won't be easy for faculty, administrators, trustees, and legislators to make such sweeping changes, but only by doing so will they make it possible for our colleges and universities to meet the nation's demands tomorrow and into the future.

Higher Education in America

Author: Derek Curtis Bok

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780691159140

Category: Education

Page: 479

View: 3359

"This is an exceedingly ambitious book. In fact, I know of nothing remotely comparable to it in scope or scale. One of its many refreshing aspects is its unfailing common sense. Bok presents the most balanced account of American higher education that I know of, stating clearly the many things that are right about it, but also highlighting problems and challenges. He has an unerring eye for the right 'big questions, ' and readers of all kinds will appreciate his focus on these questions."--William G. Bowen, president emeritus of Princeton University "Informative, provocative, and engaging, this is a very important book that should be of great interest not only to those working in higher education but to everyone else who is concerned about the future of America's colleges and universities. Its value lies in Bok's thorough analysis of some of the most urgent challenges facing higher education--and in his recommendations for actions to address them."--James J. Duderstadt, president emeritus of the University of Michigan "This book is like a very thorough checkup of a patient by an expert physician. Bok inspects nearly every major organ of the U.S. higher education system, provides a carefully balanced report on each, and concludes that the patient is in good overall health but showing signs of misuse and neglect in certain parts. The book includes exceptionally valuable observations about the system's strengths and weaknesses--and about remedies for some of its problems."--Steven G. Brint, vice provost of the University of California, Riverside "This is a major contribution to the literature on American higher education. It provides unusually comprehensive coverage and addresses controversies in an exemplary manner, fairly representing different positions and relying on empirical research to reach conclusions. I think this book will have a broad appeal throughout higher education. I can envision most administrators having a copy on their bookshelves, a ready reference and guide for their own pronouncements on the state of higher education."--Roger L. Geiger, Pennsylvania State University

Top Student, Top School?

How Social Class Shapes Where Valedictorians Go to College

Author: Alexandria Walton Radford

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022604100X

Category: Education

Page: 281

View: 9241

Most of us think that valedictorians can write their own ticket. By reaching the top of their class they have proven their merit, so their next logical step should be to attend the nation’s very best universities. Yet in Top Student, Top School?, Alexandria Walton Radford, of RTI International, reveals that many valedictorians do not enroll in prestigious institutions. Employing an original five-state study that surveyed nine hundred public high school valedictorians, she sets out to determine when and why valedictorians end up at less selective schools, showing that social class makes all the difference. Radford traces valedictorians’ paths to college and presents damning evidence that high schools do not provide sufficient guidance on crucial factors affecting college selection, such as reputation, financial aid, and even the application process itself. Left in a bewildering environment of seemingly similar options, many students depend on their parents for assistance—and this allows social class to rear its head and have a profound impact on where students attend. Simply put, parents from less affluent backgrounds are far less informed about differences in colleges’ quality, the college application process, and financial aid options, which significantly limits their child’s chances of attending a competitive school, even when their child has already managed to become valedictorian. Top Student, Top School? pinpoints an overlooked yet critical juncture in the education process, one that stands as a barrier to class mobility. By focusing solely on valedictorians, it shows that students’ paths diverge by social class even when they are similarly well-prepared academically, and this divergence is traceable to specific failures by society, failures that we can and should address. Watch an interview of Alexandria Walton Radford discussing her book here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F81c1D1BpY0

Lessons Learned

Reflections of a University President

Author: William G. Bowen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400837588

Category: Education

Page: 184

View: 4556

Lessons Learned gives unprecedented access to the university president's office, providing a unique set of reflections on the challenges involved in leading both research universities and liberal arts colleges. In this landmark book, William Bowen, former president of Princeton University and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and coauthor of the acclaimed best-seller The Shape of the River, takes readers behind closed faculty-room doors to discuss how today's colleges and universities serve their age-old missions. With extraordinary candor, clarity, and good humor, Bowen shares the sometimes-hard lessons he learned about working with trustees, faculty, and campus groups; building an effective administrative team; deciding when to speak out on big issues and when to insist on institutional restraint; managing dissent; cultivating alumni and raising funds; setting academic priorities; fostering inclusiveness; eventually deciding when and how to leave the president's office; and much more. Drawing on more than four decades of experience, Bowen demonstrates how his greatest lessons often arose from the missteps he made along the way, and how, when it comes to university governance, there are important general principles but often no single right answer. Full of compelling stories, insights, and practical wisdom, Lessons Learned frames the questions that leaders of higher education will continue to confront at a complex moment in history.

Ever the Teacher

Author: William G. Bowen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400859840

Category: Education

Page: 638

View: 3082

In one of his commencement talks as President of Princeton University, William G. Bowen called upon the assembled graduates to find ways, in their lives, to blend "the powers of the mind and the promptings of the heart." This collection of his presidential writings--drawn from annual reports, opening exercises addresses, commencement remarks, and other speeches and essays--reflects a blend of analysis and advocacy that speaks both to public policy issues affecting all of American higher education and to the deeper meanings and values of Princeton. The writings selected for inclusion here represent roughly half of the total archive annotated in Appendix B. They range from brief extracts to complete documents, and they are organized under such topics as the university in society; purposes of education/liberal education; graduate education, scholarship, and research; faculty; diversity, opportunity, and financial aid; the economics of the private research university; and a final chapter titled simply "Reflections." Throughout his fifteen-year tenure, President Bowen remained a teacher in the introductory economics course at Princeton, and his principal identification was always as a member of the faculty. His writings, as he saw them, were an extension of his teaching: an opportunity to communicate important ideas in ways that would sharpen his own understanding at the same time that they provoked others to think hard about the questions being raised. As such, his writings were a source of insight and illumination for many "students," of various descriptions, who listened, and read, and learned from what he had to say. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

World Report on Ageing and Health

Author: World Health Organization

Publisher: World Health Organization

ISBN: 9241565047

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 246

View: 3366

The WHO World report on ageing and health is not for the book shelf it is a living breathing testament to all older people who have fought for their voice to be heard at all levels of government across disciplines and sectors. - Mr Bjarne Hastrup President International Federation on Ageing and CEO DaneAge This report outlines a framework for action to foster Healthy Ageing built around the new concept of functional ability. This will require a transformation of health systems away from disease based curative models and towards the provision of older-person-centred and integrated care. It will require the development sometimes from nothing of comprehensive systems of long term care. It will require a coordinated response from many other sectors and multiple levels of government. And it will need to draw on better ways of measuring and monitoring the health and functioning of older populations. These actions are likely to be a sound investment in society's future. A future that gives older people the freedom to live lives that previous generations might never have imagined. The World report on ageing and health responds to these challenges by recommending equally profound changes in the way health policies for ageing populations are formulated and services are provided. As the foundation for its recommendations the report looks at what the latest evidence has to say about the ageing process noting that many common perceptions and assumptions about older people are based on outdated stereotypes. The report's recommendations are anchored in the evidence comprehensive and forward-looking yet eminently practical. Throughout examples of experiences from different countries are used to illustrate how specific problems can be addressed through innovation solutions. Topics explored range from strategies to deliver comprehensive and person-centred services to older populations to policies that enable older people to live in comfort and safety to ways to correct the problems and injustices inherent in current systems for long-term care.

Privilege

The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School

Author: Shamus Rahman Khan

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400836222

Category: Education

Page: 248

View: 8391

As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality. In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.

The Last Professors

The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities

Author: Frank Donoghue

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823238482

Category: Education

Page: 172

View: 1050

"What makes the modern university different from any other corporation?" asked Columbia's Andrew Delbanco recently in the New York Times. There is more and more reason to think: less and less,he answered. In this provocative book, Frank Donoghue shows how this growing corporate culture of higher education threatens its most fundamental values by erasing one of its defining features: the tenured professor. Taking a clear-eyed look at American higher education over the last twenty years, Donoghue outlines a web of forces-social, political, and institutional-dismantling the professoriate. Today, fewer than 30 percent of college and university teachers are tenured or on tenure tracks, and signs point to a future where professors will disappear. Why? What will universities look like without professors? Who will teach? Why should it matter? The fate of the professor, Donoghue shows, has always been tied to that of the liberal arts -with thehumanities at its core. The rise to prominence of the American university has been defined by the strength of the humanities and by the central role of the autonomous, tenured professor who can be both scholar and teacher. Yet in today's market-driven, rank- and ratings-obsessed world of higher education, corporate logic prevails: faculties are to be managed for optimal efficiency, productivity, and competitive advantage; casual armies of adjuncts and graduate students now fill the demand for teachers.Bypassing the distractions of the culture wars and other crises,Donoghue sheds light on the structural changes in higher education-the rise of community colleges and for-profit universities, the frenzied pursuit of prestige everywhere, the brutally competitive realities facing new Ph.D.s -that threaten the survival of professors as we've known them. There are no quick fixes in The Last Professors; rather, Donoghue offers his fellow teachers and scholarsan essential field guide to making their way in a world that no longer has room for their dreams.

Assessing Campus Diversity Initiatives

A Guide for Campus Practitioners

Author: Cynthia Hudgins,Caryn McTighe Musil,Michael T. Nettles,William E. Sedlacek,Daryl G. Smith

Publisher: Assn of Amer Colleges

ISBN: N.A

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 181

View: 8829

This volume, one in a series of three monographs, is a guidebook to evaluating campus diversity initiatives. Chapter 1 introduces campus diversity initiatives. Chapter 2, "Evaluation and Diversity," explores the need for assessment of such initiatives. Chapter 3, "Designing a Campus Diversity Evaluation," presents general concepts and guidelines and identifies various foci of diversity assessment. It also raises questions evaluators should consider as they plan assessments and discusses data collection and analysis. Chapter 4, "Frameworks for Evaluation," offers some larger frameworks for evaluation and discusses performance indicators linked to campus diversity work. Seven appendixes contain instruments for use in evaluating campus diversity programs and student experiences. (Contains 24 references.) (SLD)

The Economics of Labor Force Participation

Author: William G. Bowen,T. Aldrich Finegan

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400874777

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 924

View: 6789

This comprehensive and detailed analysis of the factors that determine who is in the labor force in the United States is equally interesting for the light it sheds on what people are not working or seeking work-and why they are not. The effects on labor force participation rates of both individual characteristics (e.g. age, marital status, color, educational attainment) and labor market conditions (unemployment, earnings, industry mix) are analyzed for specific population groups: prime-age males, single women, married women, older persons, and younger persons. The book concludes with a discussion of the sensitivity of participation rates to the tightness of labor markets as revealed by both time-series and cross-sectional analyses. Originally published in 1969. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Higher Education in America

Author: Derek Bok

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140086612X

Category: Education

Page: 496

View: 9892

Higher Education in America is a landmark work--a comprehensive and authoritative analysis of the current condition of our colleges and universities from former Harvard president Derek Bok, one of the nation's most respected education experts. Sweepingly ambitious in scope, this is a deeply informed and balanced assessment of the many strengths as well as the weaknesses of American higher education today. At a time when colleges and universities have never been more important to the lives and opportunities of students or to the progress and prosperity of the nation, Bok provides a thorough examination of the entire system, public and private, from community colleges and small liberal arts colleges to great universities with their research programs and their medical, law, and business schools. Drawing on the most reliable studies and data, he determines which criticisms of higher education are unfounded or exaggerated, which are issues of genuine concern, and what can be done to improve matters. Some of the subjects considered are long-standing, such as debates over the undergraduate curriculum and concerns over rising college costs. Others are more recent, such as the rise of for-profit institutions and massive open online courses (MOOCs). Additional topics include the quality of undergraduate education, the stagnating levels of college graduation, the problems of university governance, the strengths and weaknesses of graduate and professional education, the environment for research, and the benefits and drawbacks of the pervasive competition among American colleges and universities. Offering a rare survey and evaluation of American higher education as a whole, this book provides a solid basis for a fresh public discussion about what the system is doing right, what it needs to do better, and how the next quarter century could be made a period of progress rather than decline.

The Location of Culture

Author: Homi K. Bhabha,Professor of English and African-American Literature Homi K Bhabha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136751041

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 8951

Rethinking questions of identity, social agency and national affiliation, Bhabha provides a working, if controversial, theory of cultural hybridity - one that goes far beyond previous attempts by others. In The Location of Culture, he uses concepts such as mimicry, interstice, hybridity, and liminality to argue that cultural production is always most productive where it is most ambivalent. Speaking in a voice that combines intellectual ease with the belief that theory itself can contribute to practical political change, Bhabha has become one of the leading post-colonial theorists of this era.