The Selected Writings of Andrew Lang

Volume II: Folklore, Mythology, Anthropology; Case Studies

Author: Tom Hubbard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 114

View: 896

A novelist, poet, literary critic and anthropologist, Andrew Lang is best known for his publications on folklore, mythology and religion; many have grown up with the ‘colour’ Fairy Books which he compiled between 1889 and 1910. This three volume set presents a selection of his work in these areas. As a companion to the first volume, the second is comprised of various case studies made by Lang, ranging from ‘The Aryan Races of Peru’ and ‘The Folk-lore of France’ to ‘Irish Fairies’ and ‘The Ballads, Scottish and English’. Collectively, the General Introduction to the set and the Introductions to the individual volumes offer a thorough overview of Lang’s work in an astonishing variety of fields, including his translation work on Homer and his contributions to historiography (particularly Scottish). Headnotes to the individual items are of varying length and provide more detail on specific topics, and explanatory notes supply unique intellectual comment rather than merely factual information.

The Selected Writings of Andrew Lang: Folklore, Mythology, Anthropology (Case studies)

Author: Andrew Lang

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Anthropology

Page:

View: 817

"A novelist, poet, literary critic and anthropologist, Andrew Lang is best known for his publications on folklore, mythology and religion; many have grown up with the 'colour' Fairy Books which he compiled between 1889 and 1910. This three volume set presents a selection of his work in these areas. The first volume covers the general and theoretical aspects of Lang's work on folklore, mythology and anthropology along with the tools and concepts which he used in his often combative contributions to these inter-related disciplines. As a companion to the first volume, the second is comprised of various case studies made by Lang, ranging from 'The Aryan Races of Peru' to 'Irish Fairies'. The third volume arranges his literary criticism, first by geo-cultural context and then chronologically. It begins with Lang's views on the nature and purpose of fiction, then presents samples of his work on some of the most important authors in the respective canons of French, American, Scottish and English literature including Victor Hugo, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Burns and Charles Dickens among many others, mainly of the nineteenth century. Collectively, the General Introduction to the set and the Introductions to the individual volumes offer a thorough overview of Lang's work in an astonishing variety of fields, including his translation work on Homer and his contributions to historiography (particularly Scottish). The Introduction to Volume III sets Lang within the context of the literature of his times, comparing and contrasting him with significant contemporaries. Headnotes to the individual items are of varying length and provide more detail on specific topics, and explanatory notes supply unique intellectual comment rather than merely factual information"--

The Edinburgh Critical Edition of the Selected Writings of Andrew Lang

Volume 1 And 2

Author: Andrew Lang

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 672

View: 499

This is the first critical edition of the works of Andrew Lang, the Scottish writer whose enormous output spanned the whole the range of late-nineteenth century intellectual culture: from literary criticism to anthropology, magic to archaeology, folklore to Scottish history. Critically neglected since his death, partly because of the diversity of his interests and the volume of his writing, he was central to some of the most important debates of the period. This, and the interdisciplinary nature of his work, makes him an important figure for contemporary scholars

Annual Review of Anthropology

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Anthropology

Page: 478

View: 333

Annual compilation of critical articles from all areas of the discipline of anthropology.

Magic and Religion

Author: Andrew Lang

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 619

Andrew Lang was one of the leading lights in the study of unexplained phenomena. In this collection of essays, he takes a look at the state of the study of early religion, ritual, magic, and myth. He begins by looking at science and superstition, and the dangers of allowing belief unsupported by fact to seep into science. He then discusses the origin or religion, and "loan gods," or borrowed religion, a theory advanced by E.B. Tylor. Lang then moves on to look at William Frazer's theory of the origin of the divine character of Christ. In addition, Lang discusses other topics related to early religious beliefs, including taboos and walking through fire.ANDREW LANG was born in Selkirk, Scotland, in 1844 and became an expert on a variety of topics. He translated The Odyssey and The Iliad; wrote a number of histories of Scotland; explored mythology, religion, and folklore in his writings; and authored novels, poetry, literary criticisms, and children's books. He was one of the founders of the study of Psychical Research, the scientific investigation of unexplained phenomena.

THE GREEN FAIRY BOOK

Fairy tales and folklore collected for Victorian Children

Author: Andrew Lang

Publisher: Abela Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 476

View: 843

This was meant to be the third and last of Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of many colours. Fortunately for us it wasn't. First there was the Blue Fairy Book; then when Victorian children asked for more, the Red Fairy Book; and, when they wanted more still, the Green Fairy Book was put together. The stories in all the books are borrowed from many countries; France, Germany, Russia, Italy, Scotland, England and even one rare Chinese tale. However much these nations differ over policy and ideology, all their children agree to liking fairy tales. As we grow up, we dismiss or forget the fairy tales of our youth and the lessons they taught. But grandparents have long memories and the responsibility falls on them to tell them to their grandchildren: and when they, in their turn, become grandparents, they remember them, and tell them also. In this way these tales are older than reading and writing, far older than printing. The oldest fairy tales ever written down were written down in Egypt, in about Joseph's time, nearly three thousand six hundred years ago. Other fairy stories Homer knew, in Greece, nearly three thousand years ago, and he made them all up into a poem, the Odyssey, which all children should read some day. But here you will find an enchanted watch, the golden blackbird, Jorinde and Joringel, the shoes of swiftness, that were worn later by Jack the Giant-Killer and perennial favourites like the three little pigs. These fairy tales are the oldest stories in the world. They were first made by men, who were childlike, for their own amusement, and so they amuse children still. While these stories were made to amuse, they also teach goodness, unselfishness, courage and morals. 33% of the publisher's profit will be donated to charity.