The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights

A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium

Author: Alexander Leslie Klieforth

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 342

The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights is a history of liberty from 1300 BC to 2004 AD. The book traces the history of the philosophy and fight for freedom from the ancient Celts to the medieval Scots to the Scottish Enlightenment to the creation of America. The work contends that the roots of liberty originated in the radical political thought of the ancient Celts, the Scots' struggle for freedom, John Duns Scotus and the Scottish declaration of independence (Arbroath, 1320) that were the primary basis of the American Declaration of Independence and the modern human rights movement.

Human Rights and Dynamic Humanism

Author: Winston P. Nagan

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 1026

View: 282

Dynamic humanism in the defense and promotion of human rights. Activism is driven by positive sentiment; deprivations are driven by negative sentiment. The book explores these issues in the context of theory as well as specific chapters which focus on the multiple dimensions of the human rights problem.

The United States Government Is Illegitimate

Author: Robert G. Beard, Jr., C.P.A., C.G.M.A., J.D., LL.M.

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 738

This book is a draft of chapter one of Mr. Beard's dissertation, The Impact of Constitutional Interpretation on Individual Freedom. He was kicked out of the J.S.D. program by a Dean, who graduated from Harvard Law, because this project was, to put it politely, "politically incorrect;" justification was that it would not contribute anything new or important to the existing scholarship. Once the Dean was no longer at the law school, Mr. Beard's supervisor and co-faculty director of the program invited him back to finish this project. The purpose of this dissertation is to explain how power-elites and branches of government have reinterpreted the U.S. Constitution to increase government power and authority at the expense of individual freedom. There are only two ways to interpret the U.S. Constitution: (1) Under the freedom doctrine; or, (2) as a master-slave relationship, which is what has been going on for the past 100 years. If Americans are not slaves, then the U.S. Government is Illegitimate.

Five Stars

Missouri's Most Famous Generals

Author: James F. Muench

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 157

View: 105

"Profiles five U. S. military generals from Missouri: Alexander William Doniphan, who served in the Mexican-American War; Sterling Price, who served in the Civil War (Confederate); Ulysses S. Grant, who also served in the Civil War (Union); John Pershing, who served in WWI; and Omar Bradley, who served in WWII"--Provided by publisher.

Meccanomics

Author: Vali Nasr

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 516

Renowned Middle-East expert Vali Nasr combines historical narrative with contemporary on-the-ground research to introduce a Muslim World we’ve never seen. Meccanomics takes us behind the news, so dominated by the struggle against extremists and the Taliban, to reveal a new society, one that is being reshaped by an upwardly mobile middle class of entrepreneurs, investors, professionals, and insatiable consumers. His insights into the true situations in Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and the crucial bright spots of Dubai and Turkey provide a whole new way of thinking about the troubles and prospects in the region. Nasr’s groundbreaking analysis offers a powerful reassessment of a region where financial might – not fundamentalism – does the talking.

The Counter-Revolution of 1776

Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America

Author: Gerald Horne

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 363

View: 927

The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt. Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean, rebellious Africans were in revolt. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war. The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.