The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights

A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium

Author: Alexander Leslie Klieforth,Robert John Munro

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761827917

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 7031

The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights is a history of liberty from 1300 BC to 2004 AD. The book traces the history of the philosophy and fight for freedom from the ancient Celts to the medieval Scots to the Scottish Enlightenment to the creation of America. The work contends that the roots of liberty originated in the radical political thought of the ancient Celts, the Scots' struggle for freedom, John Duns Scotus and the Scottish declaration of independence (Arbroath, 1320) that were the primary basis of the American Declaration of Independence and the modern human rights movement.

How the Scots Invented the Modern World

The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World and Ever ything in It

Author: Arthur Herman

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307420954

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3631

An exciting account of the origins of the modern world Who formed the first literate society? Who invented our modern ideas of democracy and free market capitalism? The Scots. As historian and author Arthur Herman reveals, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Scotland made crucial contributions to science, philosophy, literature, education, medicine, commerce, and politics—contributions that have formed and nurtured the modern West ever since. Herman has charted a fascinating journey across the centuries of Scottish history. Here is the untold story of how John Knox and the Church of Scotland laid the foundation for our modern idea of democracy; how the Scottish Enlightenment helped to inspire both the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution; and how thousands of Scottish immigrants left their homes to create the American frontier, the Australian outback, and the British Empire in India and Hong Kong. How the Scots Invented the Modern World reveals how Scottish genius for creating the basic ideas and institutions of modern life stamped the lives of a series of remarkable historical figures, from James Watt and Adam Smith to Andrew Carnegie and Arthur Conan Doyle, and how Scottish heroes continue to inspire our contemporary culture, from William “Braveheart” Wallace to James Bond. And no one who takes this incredible historical trek will ever view the Scots—or the modern West—in the same way again.

Human Rights and Dynamic Humanism

Author: Winston P. Nagan,John A.C. Cartner,Robert J. Munro

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004315527

Category: Political Science

Page: 1026

View: 1731

Dynamic humanism in the defense and promotion of human rights. Activism is driven by positive sentiment; deprivations are driven by negative sentiment. The book explores these issues in the context of theory as well as specific chapters which focus on the multiple dimensions of the human rights problem.

The United States Government Is Illegitimate

Author: Robert G. Beard, Jr., C.P.A., C.G.M.A., J.D., LL.M.

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1483469573

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7306

This book is a draft of chapter one of Mr. Beard's dissertation, The Impact of Constitutional Interpretation on Individual Freedom. He was kicked out of the J.S.D. program by a Dean, who graduated from Harvard Law, because this project was, to put it politely, "politically incorrect;" justification was that it would not contribute anything new or important to the existing scholarship. Once the Dean was no longer at the law school, Mr. Beard's supervisor and co-faculty director of the program invited him back to finish this project. The purpose of this dissertation is to explain how power-elites and branches of government have reinterpreted the U.S. Constitution to increase government power and authority at the expense of individual freedom. There are only two ways to interpret the U.S. Constitution: (1) Under the freedom doctrine; or, (2) as a master-slave relationship, which is what has been going on for the past 100 years. If Americans are not slaves, then the U.S. Government is Illegitimate.

Five Stars

Missouri's Most Famous Generals

Author: James F. Muench

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826265340

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 157

View: 419

"Profiles five U. S. military generals from Missouri: Alexander William Doniphan, who served in the Mexican-American War; Sterling Price, who served in the Civil War (Confederate); Ulysses S. Grant, who also served in the Civil War (Union); John Pershing, who served in WWI; and Omar Bradley, who served in WWII"--Provided by publisher.

The U.S. Individual Income Tax Is Incompatible with a Free Society

Author: Robert G. Beard, Jr.

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1483402975

Category:

Page: 110

View: 5564

The 16th Amendment says Congress may tax incomes without apportionment but, it does not state that the 16th Amendment is superior to any other amendments and all other provisions of the Constitution. Therefore, Congress and the IRS have no authority to require U.S. citizens and residents to waive their rights under the Constitution, e.g., the 4th and 5th Amendments. But, this is exactly what is being done with respect to the administration and collection of U.S. income taxes. This is a fraud on the public. Before this fraud becomes more readily understood by the populace at large, it would be prudent for Congress to: (1) Replace the U.S. individual income tax with a national sales or consumption tax; (2) get rid of the Gestapo Tactics of the IRS in forcing people to waive their rights; and (3) start the amendment process in Article V of the Constitution to abolish the 16th Amendment.

The Religion of Democracy

Seven Liberals and the American Moral Tradition

Author: Amy Kittelstrom

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698192249

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 5155

A history of religion’s role in the American liberal tradition through the eyes of seven transformative thinkers Today we associate liberal thought and politics with secularism. When we argue over whether the nation’s founders meant to keep religion out of politics, the godless side is said to be liberal. But the role of religion in American politics has always been far more nuanced and complex than today’s debates would suggest and closer to the heart of American intellectual life than is commonly understood. American democracy was intended by its creators to be more than just a political system, and in The Religion of Democracy, historian Amy Kittelstrom shows how religion and democracy have worked together as universal ideals in American culture—and as guides to moral action and the social practice of treating one another as equals who deserve to be free. The first people in the world to call themselves “liberals” were New England Christians in the early republic, for whom being liberal meant being receptive to a range of beliefs and values. The story begins in the mid-eighteenth century, when the first Boston liberals brought the Enlightenment into Reformation Christianity, tying equality and liberty to the human soul at the same moment these root concepts were being tied to democracy. The nineteenth century saw the development of a robust liberal intellectual culture in America, built on open-minded pursuit of truth and acceptance of human diversity. By the twentieth century, what had begun in Boston as a narrow, patrician democracy transformed into a religion of democracy in which the new liberals of modern America believed that where different viewpoints overlap, common truth is revealed. The core American principles of liberty and equality were never free from religion but full of religion. The Religion of Democracy re-creates the liberal conversation from the eighteenth century to the twentieth by tracing the lived connections among seven thinkers through whom they knew, what they read and wrote, where they went, and how they expressed their opinions—from John Adams to William James to Jane Addams; from Boston to Chicago to Berkeley. Sweeping and ambitious, The Religion of Democracy is a lively narrative of quintessentially American ideas as they were forged, debated, and remade across our history.

'For Freedom Alone'

The Declaration of Arbroath, 1320

Author: Edward J. Cowan

Publisher: Birlinn Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Declaration of Arbroath

Page: 180

View: 6965

The Declaration of Arbroath, April 6, 1320, is one of the most remarkable documents to have been produced anywhere in medieval Europe. Quoted by many, understood by few, its historical significance has now almost been overtaken by its mythic status. Since 1998, the US Senate has claimed that the American Declaration of Independence is modeled upon 'the inspirational document' of Arbroath. To date, such claims have not been the subject of scholarly investigation; this is the first book-length study to examine the origins of the Declaration and the ideas upon which it drew, while tracing the rise of its mystic status in Scotland and exploring its possible impact upon Revolutionary America.

Inventing America

Jefferson's Declaration of Independence

Author: Garry Wills

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385542836

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 9678

From one of America's foremost historians, Inventing America compares Thomas Jefferson's original draft of the Declaration of Independence with the final, accepted version, thereby challenging many long-cherished assumptions about both the man and the document. Although Jefferson has long been idealized as a champion of individual rights, Wills argues that in fact his vision was one in which interdependence, not self-interest, lay at the foundation of society. "No one has offered so drastic a revision or so close or convincing an analysis as Wills has . . . The results are little short of astonishing" —(Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books)

How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?

Author: Neil

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 160846265X

Category: Political Science

Page: 840

View: 683

A historical defense of the concept of bourgeois revolution, from the sixteenth century to the twentieth.

Law, Rights and Ideology in Russia

Landmarks in the Destiny of a Great Power

Author: Bill Bowring

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134625871

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 7679

Law, Rights and Ideology in Russia: Landmarks in the destiny of a great power brings into sharp focus several key episodes in Russia’s vividly ideological engagement with law and rights. Drawing on 30 years of experience of consultancy and teaching in many regions of Russia and on library research in Russian-language texts, Bill Bowring provides unique insights into people, events and ideas. The book starts with the surprising role of the Scottish Enlightenment in the origins of law as an academic discipline in Russia in the eighteenth century. The Great Reforms of Tsar Aleksandr II, abolishing serfdom in 1861 and introducing jury trial in 1864, are then examined and debated as genuine reforms or the response to a revolutionary situation. A new interpretation of the life and work of the Soviet legal theorist Yevgeniy Pashukanis leads to an analysis of the conflicted attitude of the USSR to international law and human rights, especially the right of peoples to self-determination. The complex history of autonomy in Tsarist and Soviet Russia is considered, alongside the collapse of the USSR in 1991. An examination of Russia’s plunge into the European human rights system under Yeltsin is followed by the history of the death penalty in Russia. Finally, the secrets of the ideology of ‘sovereignty’ in the Putin era and their impact on law and rights are revealed. Throughout, the constant theme is the centuries long hegemonic struggle between Westernisers and Slavophiles, against the backdrop of the Messianism that proclaimed Russia to be the Third Rome, was revived in the mission of Soviet Russia to change the world and which has echoes in contemporary Eurasianism and the ideology of sovereignty.

Measuring America

How the United States Was Shaped by the Greatest Land Sale in History

Author: Andro Linklater

Publisher: Plume Books

ISBN: 9780452284593

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 2706

A thought-provoking history of America's system of measurement explains how, following the American Revolution, a single system of weights and measures, the American Customary System, was developed in order to help survey and map out the vast lands west of the Ohio River and examines the impact of the system on American history and culture. Reprint.

Patterns of Democracy

Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries

Author: Arend Lijphart

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300172028

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 3942

In this updated and expanded edition of his classic text, Arend Lijphart offers a broader and deeper analysis of worldwide democratic institutions than ever before. Examining thirty-six democracies during the period from 1945 to 2010, Lijphart arrives at important—and unexpected—conclusions about what type of democracy works best. Praise for the previous edition: "Magnificent. . . . The best-researched book on democracy in the world today."—Malcolm Mackerras, American Review of Politics "I can't think of another scholar as well qualified as Lijphart to write a book of this kind. He has an amazing grasp of the relevant literature, and he's compiled an unmatched collection of data."—Robert A. Dahl, Yale University "This sound comparative research . . . will continue to be a standard in graduate and undergraduate courses in comparative politics."—Choice

Inventing Freedom

How the English-Speaking Peoples Made the Modern World

Author: Daniel Hannan

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062231758

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 7665

British politician Daniel Hannan's Inventing Freedom is an ambitious account of the historical origin and spread of the principles that have made America great, and their role in creating a sphere of economic and political liberty that is as crucial as it is imperiled. According to Hannan, the ideas and institutions we consider essential to maintaining and preserving our freedoms—individual rights, private property, the rule of law, and the institutions of representative government—are the legacy of a very specific tradition that was born in England and that we Americans, along with other former British colonies, inherited. By the tenth century, England was a nation-state whose people were already starting to define themselves with reference to inherited common-law rights. The story of liberty is the story of how that model triumphed. How it was enshrined in a series of landmark victories—the Magna Carta, the English Civil War, the Glorious Revolution, the U.S. Constitution—and how it came to defeat every international rival. Today we see those ideas abandoned and scorned in the places where they once went unchallenged. Inventing Freedom is a chronicle of the success of Anglosphere exceptionalism. And it is offered at a time that may turn out to be the end of the age of political freedom.

Cracker Culture

Celtic Ways in the Old South

Author: Grady McWhiney

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817304584

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 3250

Cracker Culture is a provocative study of social life in the Old South that probes the origin of cultural differences between the South and the North throughout American history. Among Scotch-Irish settlers the term “Cracker” initially designated a person who boasted, but in American usage the word has come to designate poor whites. McWhiney uses the term to define culture rather than to signify an economic condition. Although all poor whites were Crackers, not all Crackers were poor whites; both, however, were Southerners. The author insists that Southerners and Northerners were never alike. American colonists who settled south and west of Pennsylvania during the 17th and 18th centuries were mainly from the “Celtic fringe” of the British Isles. The culture that these people retained in the New World accounts in considerable measure for the difference between them and the Yankees of New England, most of whom originated in the lowlands of the southeastern half of the island of Britain. From their solid base in the southern backcountry, Celts and their “Cracker” descendants swept westward throughout the antebellum period until they had established themselves and their practices across the Old South. Basic among those practices that determined their traditional folkways, values, norms, and attitudes was the herding of livestock on the open range, in contrast to the mixed agriculture that was the norm both in southeastern Britain and in New England. The Celts brought to the Old South leisurely ways that fostered idleness and gaiety. Like their Celtic ancestors, Southerners were characteristically violent; they scorned pacifism; they considered fights and duels honorable and consistently ignored laws designed to control their actions. In addition, family and kinship were much more important in Celtic Britain and the antebellum South than in England and the Northern United States. Fundamental differences between Southerners and Northerners shaped the course of antebellum American history; their conflict in the 1860s was not so much brother against brother as culture against culture.

The Science of Liberty

Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature

Author: Timothy Ferris

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060781513

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 9606

In his most powerful book to date, award-winning author Timothy Ferris makes a passionate case for science as the inspiration behind the rise of liberalism and democracy. Ferris shows how science was integral to the American Revolution but misinterpreted in the French Revolution; reflects on the history of liberalism, stressing its widely underestimated and mutually beneficial relationship with science; and surveys the forces that have opposed science and liberalism—from communism and fascism to postmodernism and Islamic fundamentalism. A sweeping intellectual history, The Science of Liberty is a stunningly original work that transcends the antiquated concepts of left and right.

Meccanomics

Author: Vali Nasr

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1780740573

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 8905

Renowned Middle-East expert Vali Nasr combines historical narrative with contemporary on-the-ground research to introduce a Muslim World we’ve never seen. Meccanomics takes us behind the news, so dominated by the struggle against extremists and the Taliban, to reveal a new society, one that is being reshaped by an upwardly mobile middle class of entrepreneurs, investors, professionals, and insatiable consumers. His insights into the true situations in Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and the crucial bright spots of Dubai and Turkey provide a whole new way of thinking about the troubles and prospects in the region. Nasr’s groundbreaking analysis offers a powerful reassessment of a region where financial might – not fundamentalism – does the talking.

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson

Publisher: Crown Books

ISBN: 0307719227

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 529

View: 402

An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.