The Rise and Rise of Human Rights

Author: Kirsten Sellars

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 474

This is the story of international human rights since the Second World War. It is not a tale of compassion, but a political history made by presidents, prime ministers and secretary-generals.

The Rise and Fall of Human Rights

Cynicism and Politics in Occupied Palestine

Author: Lori Allen

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 149

The Rise and Fall of Human Rights provides a groundbreaking ethnographic investigation of the Palestinian human rights world—its NGOs, activists, and "victims," as well as their politics, training, and discourse—since 1979. Though human rights activity began as a means of struggle against the Israeli occupation, in failing to end the Israeli occupation, protect basic human rights, or establish an accountable Palestinian government, the human rights industry has become the object of cynicism for many Palestinians. But far from indicating apathy, such cynicism generates a productive critique of domestic politics and Western interventionism. This book illuminates the successes and failures of Palestinians' varied engagements with human rights in their quest for independence.

Schooling for Social Change

The Rise and Impact of Human Rights Education in India

Author: Monisha Bajaj

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 208

View: 360

Schooling for Social Change offers fresh perspectives on the emerging field of human rights education in India. 60 years after independence, the Indian schooling system remains unequal. Building on over a year of fieldwork, including interviews and focus groups with policymakers, educators, parents and students, Monisha Bajaj examines different understandings of human rights education at the levels of policy, pedagogy and practice. She provides an in-depth study of the origins and effects of the Institute of Human Rights Education, a non-governmental program that operates in over 4,000 schools in India. This enlightening book offers an instructive case study of how international mandates and grassroots activism can work together. Bajaj shows how the Institute of Human Rights Education has gained significant momentum for school-based adoption, textbook reform, and policy changes in a nation-state still struggling to ensure universal access to education. Schooling for Social Change provides a wealth of analysis from the frontlines of education reform and will be of interest to all those working in international and comparative education, human rights, and South Asian development.

Russia and European Human-Rights Law

The Rise of the Civilizational Argument

Author:

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 248

View: 788

Russia and European Human-Rights Law critically examines Russia's experiences as part of the European human righs protection system since its admittance in 1998. The authors combine legal and constructivist international relations theory perspectives in this study of Russia's practice and rhetoric in the Council of Europe and before the European Court of Human Rights.

The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War

Author: Artemy M. Kalinovsky

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 440

View: 121

This new Handbook offers a wide-ranging overview of current scholarship on the Cold War, with essays from many leading scholars. The field of Cold War history has consistently been one of the most vibrant in the field of international studies. Recent scholarship has added to our understanding of familiar Cold War events, such as the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis and superpower détente, and shed new light on the importance of ideology, race, modernization, and transnational movements. The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War draws on the wealth of new Cold War scholarship, bringing together essays on a diverse range of topics such as geopolitics, military power and technology and strategy. The chapters also address the importance of non-state actors, such as scientists, human rights activists and the Catholic Church, and examine the importance of development, foreign aid and overseas assistance. The volume is organised into nine parts: Part I: The Early Cold War Part II: Cracks in the Bloc Part III: Decolonization, Imperialism and its Consequences Part IV: The Cold War in the Third World Part V: The Era of Detente Part VI: Human Rights and Non-State Actors Part VII: Nuclear Weapons, Technology and Intelligence Part VIII: Psychological Warfare, Propaganda and Cold War Culture Part IX: The End of the Cold War This new Handbook will be of great interest to all students of Cold War history, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

In the Light of Justice

The Rise of Human Rights in Native America and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Author: Walter R. Echo-Hawk

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 571

In 2007 the United Nations approved the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. United States endorsement in 2010 ushered in a new era of Indian law and policy. This book highlights steps that the United States, as well as other nations, must take to provide a more just society and heal past injustices committed against indigenous peoples.

The Rise of China and International Security

America and Asia Respond

Author: Kevin J. Cooney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 413

This edited volume offers diverse and comprehensive views of China's rise and its implications to the East Asian region and beyond. The economic growth of China, initially started in the late-1970s with domestic and rural reforms, has been increasingly driven by China's industrialization and integration into the regional and global markets. The growth and integration of China, however, has exposed China's closest neighbours and even more remote countries to its various (previously internal) problems, and the lagging political openness of China has often negatively impacted on cooperation with other countries in dealing with these problems (i.e. trans-border pollutions, epidemics, illegal migrations, organized crimes, financial management, etc.). This book integrates geopolitical and domestic political analysis of China with a broad set of transnational security issues, and includes a diversity of regional views. In doing so, it explores further than the dichotomous debate between the American realists and liberals, adding finesse to the often simplified discussions on how to deal with the rising China. This book will be of interest to students of Asian Politics, Security Studies and International Relations.

Human Rights Of, By, and For the People

How to Critique and Change the US Constitution

Author: Keri E. Iyall Smith

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 108

Together, the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights comprise the constitutional foundation of the United States. These—the oldest governing documents still in use in the world—urgently need an update, just as the constitutions of other countries have been updated and revised. Human Rights Of, By, and For the People brings together lawyers and sociologists to show how globalization and climate change offer an opportunity to revisit the founding documents. Each proposes specific changes that would more closely align US law with international law. The chapters also illustrate how constitutions are embedded in society and shaped by culture. The constitution itself sets up contentious relationships among the three branches of government and between the federal government and each state government, while the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments begrudgingly recognize the civil and political rights of citizens. These rights are described by legal scholars as "negative rights," specifically as freedoms from infringements rather than as positive rights that affirm personhood and human dignity. The contributors to this volume offer "positive rights" instead. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), written in the middle of the last century, inspires these updates. Nearly every other constitution in the world has adopted language from the UDHR. The contributors use intersectionality, critical race theory, and contemporary critiques of runaway economic inequality to ground their interventions in sociological argument.

The Rise of Gay Rights and the Fall of the British Empire

Liberal Resistance and the Bloomsbury Group

Author: David A. J. Richards

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 887

This book argues that there is an important connection between ethical resistance to British imperialism and the ethical discovery of gay rights. It examines the roots of liberal resistance in Britain and resistance to patriarchy in the USA, showing the importance of fighting the demands of patriarchal manhood and womanhood to countering imperialism. Advocates of feminism and gay rights are key because they resist the gender binary's role in rationalizing sexism and homophobia. The connection between the rise of gay rights and the fall of empire illuminates questions of the meaning of democracy and universal human rights as shared human values that have appeared since World War II. The book casts doubt on the thesis that arguments for gay rights must be extrinsic to democracy and reflect Western values. To the contrary, gay rights arise from within liberal democracy, and its critics polemically use such opposition to cover and rationalize their own failures of democracy.