Der Staat / Politeia

Griechisch - Deutsch

Author: Platon

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3050092459

Category: History

Page: 1008

View: 8271

Mit seinem Werk Politeia ("Der Staat") wurde Platon zum Begründer einer neuen literarischen Gattung: der politisch-philosophischen Utopie. Schon im Altertum versuchten eine Reihe von Autoren ihm nachzueifern (Theopompos, Euhemeros, Iambulos, parodistisch auch Lukian), und nachdem Thomas Morus mit dem namengebenden Werk "Utopia" (1516) die Gattung gleichsam neu belebt hatte, entstand eine nicht mehr zu überblickende Flut utopischer Entwürfe. Doch nicht nur durch die hier entfaltete Staatslehre erwies sich die "Politeia" als grundlegendes und richtungsweisendes Werk: Platons Ausführungen zu solch verschiedenen philosophischen Gebieten wie der Theorie der Erziehung, der Theorie der Dichtung, der Ethik und Tugendlehre, der Seelenlehre haben die Diskussion bis in unsere Tage beeinflusst. Platon ist aber auch ein Sprachkünstler, der seine Werke als Dialog-"Dramen" meisterhaft gestaltete. Dabei weiß er sich souverän von dem Medium Schrift zu distanzieren, das drei Hauptmängel aufweist: Sie sagt immer dasselbe, kann auf Fragen nicht antworten; sie wendet sich unterschiedslos an alle, weiß nicht, zu wem sie reden und zu wem sie schweigen soll; und wird sie angegriffen, so kann sie sich nicht selbst zur Hilfe kommen. Dass der Kern der platonischen Ideenlehre nicht in dafür ungeeignete Köpfe "gepflanzt" werden kann, beweist das Erste Buch: Das aufgezwungene Gespräch über die Gerechtigkeit mit Polemarchos und dem Sophisten Thrasymachos endet in einer Aporie (so wie Platons Versuche, seine politische Theorie in die Praxis umzusetzen, an der mangelnden Eignung des jungen Herrschers von Syrakus, Dionysios II., scheitern mussten). Erst als Platon (von Buch II an) mit seinen Brüdern Glaukon und Adeimantos das Gesprächsthema wieder aufgreift, kann der Funken der Erkenntnis überspringen, und "Einsicht leuchtet auf".

The Republic of Plato

Author: Plató

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052105964X

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 538

View: 6131

The late James Adam's edition of The Republic of Plato was published in 1902 and has long been out of print; it still remains among the most detailed and valuable critical editions available. D. A. Rees, Fellow and Tutor of Jesus College, Oxford, has written an introduction of 15,000 words for this edition. In it, he surveys Adam's work on The Republic and reviews subsequent work on the textual problems, language and meaning of the book. The book is divided into two volumes; Volume I. Introduction and Books I-V, and Volume II, printed here, Books VI-X and Indexes.

Der Staat

Author: Plato

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783937229874

Category:

Page: 505

View: 2921

Republic

Author: Plato

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067499650X

Category: Political science

Page: 567

View: 9773

"Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family ca. 427 BCE. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, among whose many notable alumni was Aristotle. Traditionally ascribed to Plato are thirty-six dialogues developing Socrates’s dialectic method and composed with great stylistic virtuosity, together with thirteen letters. Republic, a masterpiece of philosophical and political thought, concerns righteousness both in individuals and in communities, and proposes an ideal state organized and governed on philosophical principles. This edition, which replaces the original Loeb edition by Paul Shorey, offers text, translation, and annotation that are fully current with modern scholarship."--Publisher website.

Plato on Justice and Power

Reading Book I of Plato's Republic

Author: Kimon Lycos

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780887064159

Category: Philosophy

Page: 201

View: 3632

Most commentaries on the Republic rush through Book I with embarrassment because the arguments of the participants, including Socrates, are specious. Beginning with Book II, the arguments are brilliant, so why did Plato write Book I? Lycos shows that the function of Book I is to attack the view that justice is external to the soul--external to the power humans have to render things good--and is merely instrumental to a good society. The dramatic situation in Book I presents justice as internal, requiring not laws, but discrimination and virtue. After this introduction, the rest of the Republic serves to sketch out what virtue is and how to practice discrimination. Plato on Justice and Power ends with some illuminating contrasts between this sense of virtue and that characteristic of our modern liberal politics which takes an external view of justice similar to the Athenians view at the time of Plato.

The Transformation of Plato's Republic

Author: Kenneth Dorter

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739111888

Category: Philosophy

Page: 395

View: 1156

Author Ken Dorter, in a passage-by-passage analysis traces Plato's depiction of how the most basic forms of human functioning and social justice contain the seed of their evolution into increasingly complex structures, as well as the seed of their degeneration. Dorter also traces Plato's tendency to begin an investigation with models based on rigid distinctions for the sake of clarity, which are subsequently transformed into more fluid conceptions that no longer sacrifice complexity and subtlety for clarity. It's the author's claim that virtually every positive doctrine put forward in the dialogue is problematized somewhere else in the dialogue. This accounts for the apparent incoherence among various parts of the Republic. The dramatic changes of style and content after Books 1, 4, 7, and 9 give it an appearance of being a pastiche of material written at different times, as it is often interpreted. Dorter locates an underlying structure that explains these changes. It is widely recognized that the dialogue is organized symmetrically in the form of an arch, with the beginning and end sharing related themes, the second and penultimate sections sharing other related themes, and so on until the forward series and the reverse series meet in the middle of the dialogue. Dorter's original claim is that the symmetrical segments of the arch reflect the levels of the 'Divided Line.' Dorter contends that the overall organization of the Republic can be seen to illustrate and imitate the philosophers' ascent from the cave, and their subsequent return to it with altered perspectives. This erudite, salient, and expansive new look at Plato's Republic is essential for philosophy, political theorists, and anyone interested in Plato scholarship.

Plato: 'The Republic'

Author: Plato,G. R. F. Ferrari,Tom Griffith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521484435

Category: Philosophy

Page: 382

View: 1714

Presents the most important of the Socratic dialogues as if it were a conversation; deals with the creation of an ideal commonwealth and ranks as one of the earliest Utopian works.

The Message of Plato (RLE: Plato)

A Re-Interpretation of the Republic

Author: Edward J Urwick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136231161

Category: Philosophy

Page: 4

View: 2451

Edward Urwick’s original work draws upon Plato’s best known work, the Republic, to provide a new interpretation of Plato’s teaching based upon Indian religious thought. Most scholars have sought to interpret the Republic from the standpoint of politics, ethics, and metaphysics and indeed the accepted title of the dialogue – Concerning a Polity or Republic – would seem to legitimate this. Even the alternative title for the work – Concerning Justice – seems to justify such an approach. Yet the original Greek work, Dikaiosune, had a fuller meaning: righteousness. The author believes this gives a truer clue to the meaning of the dialogue. It is a discussion of righteousness in all its forms, from the just dealing of the law-abiding citizen to the spirit of holiness in the saint.

Plato's Republic

The Theatre of the Mind

Author: Plato

Publisher: Agora Publications, Inc.

ISBN: 9781887250252

Category: Philosophy, Ancient

Page: 398

View: 7157

The Greek philosopher Plato was born in Athens in 428 B.C. He created dramatic dialogues, probably intended for oral performance, but seldom presented in that format until Agora Publications launched this series of dramatizations in 1994. The Republic explores most of the fundamental questions of philosophy, beginning with a search for how to define justice, moving to a quest for a model of the best possible human community, and concluding with reflections on the immortality of the soul.

Plato's Republic

A Study

Author: Stanley Rosen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300126921

Category: Philosophy

Page: 423

View: 7617

In this book a distinguished philosopher offers a comprehensive interpretation of Plato's most controversial dialogue. Treating the Republic as a unity and focusing on the dramatic form as the presentation of the argument, Stanley Rosen challenges earlier analyses of the Republic (including the ironic reading of Leo Strauss and his disciples) and argues that the key to understanding the dialogue is to grasp the author's intention in composing it, in particular whether Plato believed that the city constructed in the Republic is possible and desirable. Rosen demonstrates that the fundamental principles underlying the just city are theoretically attractive but that the attempt to enact them in practice leads to conceptual incoherence and political disaster. The Republic, says Rosen, is a vivid illustration of the irreconcilability of philosophy and political practice.

The Republic of Plato: Volume 1, Books I-V

Author: Plato

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521059631

Category: Dialogues, Greek

Page: 532

View: 2724

James Adam's edition of Plato's Republic with an introduction by D. A. Rees reviewing Adam's work on the language and meaning of the book.

The Republic of Plato - Translated Into English by A. D. Lindsay

Author: Plato

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1408631679

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 9821

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... (6) Columns for Discount on Purchases and Discount on Notes on the same side of the Cash Book; (c) Columns for Discount on Sales and Cash Sales on the debit side of the Cash Book; (d) Departmental columns in the Sales Book and in the Purchase Book. Controlling Accounts.--The addition of special columns in books of original entry makes possible the keeping of Controlling Accounts. The most common examples of such accounts are Accounts Receivable account and Accounts Payable account. These summary accounts, respectively, displace individual customers' and creditors' accounts in the Ledger. The customers' accounts are then segregated in another book called the Sales Ledger or Customers' Ledger, while the creditors' accounts are kept in the Purchase or Creditors' Ledger. The original Ledger, now much reduced in size, is called the General Ledger. The Trial Balance now refers to the accounts in the General Ledger. It is evident that the task of taking a Trial Balance is greatly simplified because so many fewer accounts are involved. A Schedule of Accounts Receivable is then prepared, consisting of the balances found in the Sales Ledger, and its total must agree with the balance of the Accounts Receivable account shown in the Trial Balance. A similar Schedule of Accounts Payable, made up of all the balances in the Purchase Ledger, is prepared, and it must agree with the balance of the Accounts Payable account of the General Ledger." The Balance Sheet.--In the more elementary part of the text, the student learned how to prepare a Statement of Assets and Liabilities for the purpose of disclosing the net capital of an enterprise. In the present chapter he was shown how to prepare a similar statement, the Balance Sheet. For all practical...

The Rhetoric of Plato's Republic

Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion

Author: James L. Kastely

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022627876X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 6811

Plato isn’t exactly thought of as a champion of democracy, and perhaps even less as an important rhetorical theorist. In this book, James L. Kastely recasts Plato in just these lights, offering a vivid new reading of one of Plato’s most important works: the Republic. At heart, Kastely demonstrates, the Republic is a democratic epic poem and pioneering work in rhetorical theory. Examining issues of justice, communication, persuasion, and audience, he uncovers a seedbed of theoretical ideas that resonate all the way up to our contemporary democratic practices. As Kastely shows, the Republic begins with two interrelated crises: one rhetorical, one philosophical. In the first, democracy is defended by a discourse of justice, but no one can take this discourse seriously because no one can see—in a world where the powerful dominate the weak—how justice is a value in itself. That value must be found philosophically, but philosophy, as Plato and Socrates understand it, can reach only the very few. In order to reach its larger political audience, it must become rhetoric; it must become a persuasive part of the larger culture—which, at that time, meant epic poetry. Tracing how Plato and Socrates formulate this transformation in the Republic, Kastely isolates a crucial theory of persuasion that is central to how we talk together about justice and organize ourselves according to democratic principles.

Plato's Republic

Critical Essays

Author: Richard Kraut

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0585071551

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 9570

Bringing between two covers the most influential and accessible articles on Plato's Republic, this collection illuminates what is widely held to be the most important work of Western philosophy and political theory. It will be valuable not only to philosophers, but to political theorists, historians, classicists, literary scholars, and interested general readers.