The Republic of Plato

Author: Plató

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 538

View: 910

The late James Adam's edition of The Republic of Plato was published in 1902 and has long been out of print; it still remains among the most detailed and valuable critical editions available. D. A. Rees, Fellow and Tutor of Jesus College, Oxford, has written an introduction of 15,000 words for this edition. In it, he surveys Adam's work on The Republic and reviews subsequent work on the textual problems, language and meaning of the book. The book is divided into two volumes; Volume I. Introduction and Books I-V, and Volume II, printed here, Books VI-X and Indexes.

The Transformation of Plato's Republic

Author: Kenneth Dorter

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 395

View: 266

Author Ken Dorter, in a passage-by-passage analysis traces Plato's depiction of how the most basic forms of human functioning and social justice contain the seed of their evolution into increasingly complex structures, as well as the seed of their degeneration. Dorter also traces Plato's tendency to begin an investigation with models based on rigid distinctions for the sake of clarity, which are subsequently transformed into more fluid conceptions that no longer sacrifice complexity and subtlety for clarity. It's the author's claim that virtually every positive doctrine put forward in the dialogue is problematized somewhere else in the dialogue. This accounts for the apparent incoherence among various parts of the Republic. The dramatic changes of style and content after Books 1, 4, 7, and 9 give it an appearance of being a pastiche of material written at different times, as it is often interpreted. Dorter locates an underlying structure that explains these changes. It is widely recognized that the dialogue is organized symmetrically in the form of an arch, with the beginning and end sharing related themes, the second and penultimate sections sharing other related themes, and so on until the forward series and the reverse series meet in the middle of the dialogue. Dorter's original claim is that the symmetrical segments of the arch reflect the levels of the 'Divided Line.' Dorter contends that the overall organization of the Republic can be seen to illustrate and imitate the philosophers' ascent from the cave, and their subsequent return to it with altered perspectives. This erudite, salient, and expansive new look at Plato's Republic is essential for philosophy, political theorists, and anyone interested in Plato scholarship.

Plato: 'The Republic'

Author: Plato

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 382

View: 188

Presents the most important of the Socratic dialogues as if it were a conversation; deals with the creation of an ideal commonwealth and ranks as one of the earliest Utopian works.

The Republic

Author: Plato

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 369

View: 352

A model for the ideal state includes discussion of the nature and application of justice, the role of the philosopher in society, the goals of education, and the effects of art upon character.

Aristotle's Criticism of Plato's Republic

Author: Robert Mayhew

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 163

View: 570

"The first five chapters of the second book of Aristotle's Politics contain a series of criticisms leveled against Plato's Republic. ... Mayhoew demonstrates that within this criticism Aristotle presents his views on an extremely fundamental issue: the unity of the city and the proper relationship between the individual and the city."--Cover.

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic

Author: Nickolas Pappas

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 252

View: 178

In the second edition of this title, Nickolas Pappas extends his exploration of Plato's text to include substantial revisions and new material. The chapters on Plato's ethics and politics have been revised and enlarged to include two brand new sections, plus further discussion of Plato on aesthetics.