The Referendum on Separation for Scotland, Session 2012-13

Vol. 2: Oral and Written Evidence

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 321

View: 317

For related report, see HCP 542 (ISBN 9780215047489)

The Referendum on Separation for Scotland

How Would Separation Affect Jobs in the Scottish Defence Industry?, Eighth Report of Session 2012-13, Report, Together with Formal Minutes

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 37

View: 879

The defence industry is very important to the Scottish economy, providing more than 15,000 jobs and contributing between £ 1.8 billion-£2 billion annually to the Scottish economy. Those firms or subsidiaries dependent on British Army, RAF or Royal Navy orders under Article 346 of the European Union Treaties (which allow the UK to reserve certain orders to national suppliers) will lose such work, which will be transferred to other parts of the UK. It is also recognised that the market offered to defence suppliers in a separate Scotland will be negligible in size compared to that of the United Kingdom as a whole and the joint projects in which it participates. A separate Scotland, particularly one which has deported the Royal Navy's submarine force and potentially enforced unilateral nuclear disarmament upon the United Kingdom will not necessarily be seen as a reliable ally. Similarly a future separate Scotland's access to secret technology owned elsewhere is unlikely to be automatic. There will not necessarily be the maximum security clearance necessary to allow export to, or collaboration with, US or other suppliers or purchasers. A separate Scotland is unlikely to be able to fund the level of research and development necessary to maintain Scottish companies at the cutting edge of technology. The defence industry in Scotland is designed to meet the needs of its main customer-the Ministry of Defence. It is essential that the Scottish Government spells out, as quickly as possible, its intentions for procurement and research budgets, and foreign and defence policies.

House of Commons: Sessional Returns - HC 1

9 May 2012 - 25 April 2013

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 345

View: 182

On cover and title page: House, committees of the whole House, general committees and select committees. On title page: Returns to orders of the House of Commons dated 14 May 2013 (the Chairman of Ways and Means)

The Agreement on a Referendum on Independence for Scotland

7th Report of Session 2012-13, Report

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Lords: Select Committee on the Constitution

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 16

View: 606

This report finds that serious questions remain unanswered about the Agreement reached between the UK and Scottish Governments on the holding of a referendum on Scottish independence. The Agreement provides for power to hold a referendum on Scottish independence to be devolved to the Scottish Parliament. It proposes that this be done through a ministerial order under section 30 of the Scotland Act 1998; such a process would not require an Act of Parliament, and so limits the ability of MPs and peers to control the terms of the referendum. The Committee finds that neither the UK nor the Scottish Parliaments were given the opportunity to contribute directly to the Agreement negotiations. It questions whether a section 30 order would be robust enough to protect the decision to hold a referendum from legal challenge. Although such a challenge would be unlikely to succeed, it would delay the process and cause confusion. The Committee also finds that there may be legal and practical problems associated with the proposal to allow 16 and 17 year-olds to vote in a referendum. The Committee fears that, if the franchise is lowered, some 16 and 17 year-olds could be denied the right to vote because of inadequate process. The role of the Electoral Commission in important in ensuring that the referendum question is intelligible and neutral. Although the two Governments agreed on the advisory role of the Electoral Commission, the Committee thinks its advice is authoritative and should be followed.

Remploy Marine Fife

first report of session 2013-14, Vol. 1: Report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 51

View: 471

Following a review of disability employment support in 2011, the Government announced its intention to reduce and ultimately withdraw funding for Remploy. 36 factories were sold or closed in the first phase of this process. In December 2012, it was revealed that the remaining factories would be put up for sale and the Government invited bids. This included Remploy Marine Fife. Remploy Marine Fife is an internationally recognised business producing 30,000 lifejackets a year. It has a full order book, and some capacity to expand. Its products have an international quality Kitemark. The markup - apparently over £100 - applied by the factories' customer, Ocean Safety, seems exorbitant and is difficult to justify. The Government should look again at how Remploy agreed this contract on such generous terms for the client. This business has considerable potential and should be supported accordingly. This high quality manufacturing base in Fife must be maintained otherwise it is likely that it - and the design and expertise developed here - will be transferred overseas. A "one size fits all" approach does not take account of the unique circumstances and potential of Remploy Marine Fife. One of the central criteria by which bids for the Remploy sites will be judged is sustaining the workforce in employment. The Committee rejects the DWP and Remploy's unyielding, inflexible approach and failure to offer adequate transitional support

The Stationery Office Annual Catalogue 2012

Author: Stationery Office

Publisher: Stationery Office/Tso

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 536

View: 128

The Stationery Office annual catalogue 2012 provides a comprehensive source of bibliographic information on over 4200 Parliamentary, statutory and official publications - from the UK Parliament, the Northern Ireland Assembly, and many government departments and agencies - which were issued in the year.

The referendum on separation for Scotland, session 2010-12

oral and written evidence, [2nd November 2011 - 18 April 2012]

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 233

View: 374

Scotland's Choices

Author: Iain McLean

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 905

Scotland's Choices, now fully revised for the critical last few months before the referendum, explains the choice that Scotland will have to make in September 2014. The authors clearly explain the issues and how each of the options would be put into place

House of Commons - Scottish Affairs Committee: The Referendum on Separation for Scotland: A Defence Force For Scotland - A Conspiracy Of Optimism - HC 842

A Defence Force for Scotland - a Conspiracy of Optimism?, Third Report of Session 2013-14, Report, Together with Formal Minutes

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 71

View: 140

The Scottish Government's White Paper must make absolutely clear the details of both its foreign and defence policies. Much of what has been suggested up to now suffers from a conspiracy of optimism. The most explicit pledges made to date include: that the whole cost of security and defence will be no more than £2.5 billion, that personnel in the armed services will total 15,000 full time and 5,000 reserve personnel, and that the defence force will include "current Scottish raised and restored UK regiments". Will we then have a defence force which is army heavy? An army which is infantry heavy? Or will historic regiments be redesignated as platoons, reserves or non-infantry units? If Faslane is to be kept at its existing workforce, how will people be retrained? What costs will be inccurred in the transition to the new Scottish Defence Force? What are the implications for procurement whether or not Scotland gets the assets it wants? Hanging over all of this is the future of Trident. Will a separate Scotland impose unilateral nuclear disarmament on the UK? Furthermore, membership for Scotland of NATO will require not only the unanimous agreement of all the existing NATO members, but also the resolution of any disputes with the UK. The Scottish Government must spell out what wages and conditions it would propose to offer to compensate those who would leave behind participation in world class armed services. The people of Scotland are entitled to expect that those who propose drastic change can explain what the consequences would be.

House of Commons - Scottish Affairs Committee: The Referendum on Separation for Scotland: The Need for Truth - HC 828

The Need for Truth, Second Report of Session 2013-14, Report, Together with Formal Minutes

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Scottish Affairs Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 31

View: 832

In a report published ahead of the expected White Paper on Separation, the Scottish Affairs Committee says that the Scottish Government must meet high standards of accuracy and openness and avoid any risk of using public money to promote a party political agenda. Any document that is produced as a Government White Paper must meet the highest standards of accuracy and clarity, and must be totally honest about the risks, alternative possible scenarios and costs involved in Separation. The Committee is concerned that the Scottish Government has shown a propensity to mislead Scottish voters on the likely outcome of some of the negotiations that would be needed for the final Separation agreement - as well as the timescale on which this could be achieved. Many important questions - like EU membership or the currency - have to be negotiated with the UK Government and others, and the White Paper cannot simply claim that the SNP will get whatever they want. It must lay out all the alternative scenarios that might actually emerge from these negotiations - and their consequences. Particular uncertainties highlighted by the Committee include membership of the EU, currency, and benefits, public services, taxation and pensions.