The Prisoner Society

Power, Adaptation and Social Life in an English Prison

Author: Ben Crewe

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 544

View: 147

While the use of imprisonment continues to rise in developed nations, we have little sociological knowledge of the prison's inner world. Based on extensive fieldwork in a medium-security prison in the UK, HMP Wellingborough, The Prisoner Society: Power, Adaptation and Social Life in an English Prison provides an in-depth analysis of the prison's social anatomy. It explains how power is exercised by the institution, individualizing the prisoner community and demanding particular forms of compliance and engagement. Drawing on prisoners' life stories, it shows how different prisoners experience and respond to the new range of penal practices and frustrations. It then explains how the prisoner society - its norms, hierarchy and social relationships - is shaped both by these conditions of confinement and by the different backgrounds, values and identities that prisoners bring into the prison environment.

Race, Criminal Justice, and Migration Control

Enforcing the Boundaries of Belonging

Author: Mary Bosworth

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 784

In this era of mass mobility, the difference between those who are permitted to migrate and those criminalized, controlled, and prohibited from migrating is often linked to race. Placing race at the centre of its analysis, this volume brings together fourteen essays that examine, question, andexplain the growing intersection between criminal justice and migration control. Through the lens of race, we see how criminal justice and migration enmesh in order to exclude, stop, and excise racialized citizens and non-citizens from societies across the world within, beyond, and along borders. Organized in four sections, the book begins with chapters that present a conceptual analysis of race, borders, and social control, moving to the institutions that make up and shape the criminal justice and migration complex. The remaining chapters explore the key sites where criminal justice andmigration control intersect: policing, courts, and punishment. Together the volume presents a critical and timely analysis of how race shapes and complicates mobility and how racism is enabled and reanimated when criminal justice and migration control coalesce. Race and the meaning of race inrelation to these processes and the impact it has on notions of citizenship and belonging are carefully examined through each of the chapters presented in the book, transforming the way we think about migration.

Extreme Punishment

Comparative Studies in Detention, Incarceration and Solitary Confinement

Author: Keramet Reiter

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 255

View: 792

This ground-breaking collection examines the erosion of the legal boundaries traditionally dividing civil detention from criminal punishment. The contributors empirically demonstrate how the mentally ill, non-citizen immigrants, and enemy combatants are treated like criminals in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Prisons, Punishment and the Pursuit of Security

Author: D. Drake

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 441

Drawing on research in men's long-term, maximum-security prisons, this book examines three interconnected problems: the tendency of the prison to obscure other social problems and conceal its own failings, the pursuit of greater levels of human security through repressive and violent means and the persistence of the belief in the problem of 'evil'.

Black police associations

an analysis of race and ethnicity within constabularies

Author: Simon Holdaway

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 321

Black Police Associations is based on Professor Holdaway's two-year ESRC funded project Black Police Associations (BPAs) in the UK. This project built upon the theoretical and evidential foundations of his previous work to analyze the new phenomenon of Black Police Associations established in the majority of constabularies in England and Wales. The author takes a sociological and theoretical approach to the subject, in contrast to current criminology which is more evaluative and policy oriented. The analysis is underpinned with the notion that race and ethnicity are socially constructed: the book describes and analyzes how race and ethnicity are constructed and sustained within constabularies and how they have changed during the last two decades, providing students, researchers and academics with a sociological perspective on understanding race within criminal justice institutions. Black Police Associations covers the history of BPAs; the construction and consequences of the notion of 'black' as a political emblem within constabularies; the work and influence of BPAs (nationally and within constabularies); post-McPherson policing; new forms of racism within constabularies; ethnic identities amongst ethnic minority police officers and BPAs, and the occupational culture. By analyzing the work of BPAs within constabularies, the author posits a number of implications for change within the management of constabularies.