War in the Early Modern World

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 185728688X

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 9401

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Military Revolution and Political Change

Origins of Democracy and Autocracy in Early Modern Europe

Author: Brian Downing

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691024752

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 5356

To examine the long-run origins of democracy and dictatorship, Brian Downing focuses on the importance of medieval political configurations and of military modernization in the early modern period. He maintains that in late medieval times an array of constitutional arrangements distinguished Western Europe from other parts of the world and predisposed it toward liberal democracy. He then looks at how medieval constitutionalism was affected by the "military revolution" of the early modern era--the shift from small, decentralized feudal levies to large standing armies. Downing won the American Political Science Association's Gabriel Almond Award for the dissertation on which this book was based.

The Origins of the Second World War in Europe

Author: P. M. H. Bell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317865251

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4416

PMH Bell's famous book is a comprehensive study of the period and debates surrounding the European origins of the Second World War. He approaches the subject from three different angles: describing the various explanations that have been offered for the war and the historiographical debates that have arisen from them, analysing the ideological, economic and strategic forces at work in Europe during the 1930s, and tracing the course of events from peace in 1932, via the initial outbreak of hostilities in 1939, through to the climactic German attack on the Soviet Union in 1941 which marked the descent into general conflict. Written in a lucid, accessible style, this is an indispensable guide to the complex origins of the Second World War.

The Origins Of Western Warfare

Militarism And Morality In The Ancient World

Author: Doyne Dawson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429975716

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 380

What is the source of the uniquely Western way of war, the persistent militarism that has made Europe the site of bloodshed throughout history and secured the dominance of the West over the rest of the world? The answer, Doyne Dawson persuasively argues in this groundbreaking new book, is to be found in the very bedrock of Western civilization: ancient Greece and Rome.The Origins of Western Warfare begins with an overview of primitive warfare, showing how the main motivations of prehistoric combat?revenge and honor?set the tone for Greek thinking about questions of war and morality. These ideas, especially as later developed by the Romans, ensured the emergence of a distinctive Western tradition of warfare: dynamic, aggressive, and devastatingly successful when turned against non-Western cultures.Dawson identifies key factors that led Western culture down this particular path. First, the Greeks argued that war could be justified as an instrument of human and divine justice, securing the social and cosmic order. Second, war was seen as a rational instrument of foreign policy. This, probably the most original contribution of the Greeks to military thought, was articulated as early as the fifth century b.c. Finally, Greek military thought was dominated by the principle of ?civic militarism,? in which the ideal state is based upon self-governing citizens trained and armed for war.The Roman version of civic militarism became thoroughly imperial in spirit, and in general, the Romans successfully modified these Greek ideas to serve their expansionist policies. At the end of antiquity, these traditions were passed on to medieval Europe, forming the basis for the just war doctrines of the Church. Later, in early modern Europe, they were fully revived, systematized, and given a basis in natural law?to the benefit of absolute monarchs. For centuries this neoclassical synthesis served the needs of European elites, and echoes of it are still heard in contemporary justifications for war.Providing a careful reconsideration of what the classical sources tell us about Western thinking on fundamental questions of war and peace, The Origins of Western Warfare makes a lasting contribution to our understanding of one of the most persistent and troubling aspects of Western culture.

Religious War and Religious Peace in Early Modern Europe

Author: Wayne P. Te Brake

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316839478

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9188

Religious War and Religious Peace in Early Modern Europe presents a novel account of the origins of religious pluralism in Europe. Combining comparative historical analysis with contentious political analysis, it surveys six clusters of increasingly destructive religious wars between 1529 and 1651, analyzes the diverse settlements that brought these wars to an end, and describes the complex religious peace that emerged from two centuries of experimentation in accommodating religious differences. Rejecting the older authoritarian interpretations of the age of religious wars, the author uses traditional documentary sources as well as photographic evidence to show how a broad range Europeans - from authoritative elites to a colorful array of religious 'dissenters' - replaced the cultural 'unity and purity' of late-medieval Christendom with a variable and durable pattern of religious diversity, deeply embedded in political, legal, and cultural institutions.

The Road to War

The Origins of World War II

Author: Andrew Wheatcroft,Richard Overy

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448112397

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 3879

Hailed on publication as a thought-provoking, authoritative analysis of the true beginnings of the Second World War, this revised edition of The Road to War is essential reading for anyone interested in this momentous period of history. Taking each major nation in turn, the book tells the story of their road to war; recapturing the concerns, anxieties and prejudices of the statesmen of the thirties.

The Origins of the Second World War

Author: Victor Rothwell

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719059582

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 1002

In this accessible account Victor Rothwell examines the origins of the Second Word War, from the flawed peace settlement of 1919 to the start of the true world war at Pearl Harbor in 1941. Reflecting current historical understanding of the subject, the author discusses, within a chronological framework, the underlying issues, such as the clash between 'have' and 'have not' states, as well as their relative military and economic strengths. Did the cause of peace advance in the 1920s, only to be stopped in its tracks and threatened with reversal by the economic depression that began with the Wall Street crash in 1929? What was the nature of Nazi thinking about war, foreign policy and the (primarily British) policy of appeasement, which sought to accommodate the Third Reich? Why did Britain itself for long prefer appeasement to collective security? Furthermore, the events in the Far East are examined and a contrast is drawn between the greater interest of the United States in that region than in Europe throughout the 1930s. Lastly, the complex process by which European war, starting in September 1939, became world war is treated as much more than an epilogue to what happened during the preceding decade.

The Origins of the Modern European State System, 1494-1618

Author: M.S. Anderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317892755

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 7677

This study examines the early years of the post-medieval European states and the growth of a recognisably 'modern' system for handling their international relations. M S Anderson gives much of his space to France, Spain and England and to the state of the relations between them, as their various power plays rolled over Italy and the Low countries, but, he also incorporates the Northern and Eastern states including Russia, Poland and the Baltic world into the main European political arena. He provides a broad narrative of European politics and its impact on diplomacy including the Italian Wars 1494-1559, the French Wars of Religion, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, and the relations of Christendom and Islam with the advance of the Ottoman empire. He also gives considerable attention to the influence of military and economic factors on international relations.

A History of Modern Europe

From 1815 to the Present

Author: Albert S. Lindemann

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111832157X

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 9464

A History of Modern Europe surveys European history from the defeat of Napoleon to the twenty-first century, presenting major historical themes in an authoritative and compelling narrative. Concise, readable single volume covering Europe from the early nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century Vigorous interpretation of events reflects a fresh, concise perspective on European history Clear and thought-provoking treatment of major historical themes Lively narrative reflects complexity of modern European history, but remains accessible to those unfamiliar with the field

The Origins of Major War

Author: Dale C. Copeland

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801467047

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 6073

One of the most important questions of human existence is what drives nations to war-especially massive, system-threatening war. Much military history focuses on the who, when, and where of war. In this riveting book, Dale C. Copeland brings attention to bear on why governments make decisions that lead to, sustain, and intensify conflicts. Copeland presents detailed historical narratives of several twentieth-century cases, including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. He highlights instigating factors that transcend individual personalities, styles of government, geography, and historical context to reveal remarkable consistency across several major wars usually considered dissimilar. The result is a series of challenges to established interpretive positions and provocative new readings of the causes of conflict. Classical realists and neorealists claim that dominant powers initiate war. Hegemonic stability realists believe that wars are most often started by rising states. Copeland offers an approach stronger in explanatory power and predictive capacity than these three brands of realism: he examines not only the power resources but the shifting power differentials of states. He specifies more precisely the conditions under which state decline leads to conflict, drawing empirical support from the critical cases of the twentieth century as well as major wars spanning from ancient Greece to the Napoleonic Wars.

A Companion to World War I

Author: John Horne

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119968704

Category: History

Page: 724

View: 3064

"A Companion to the First World War" brings together a team of distinguished historians from 10 countries who contribute 38 substantial and thought-provoking chapters. The volume opens with a section on the state of the world before 1914, as it prepared for war without anticipating its true nature, and concludes with an examination of the conflict's military, diplomatic, and cultural legacies. In addition to covering the military history of the war and the individual states involved, contributors explore major themes such as war crimes, occupations, film, and gender. Reflecting the latest historical research, this Companion enriches our understanding of the origins, nature, and impact of what remains one of the most devastating events in modern history.

Politics and War

European Conflict from Philip II to Hitler

Author: David E. Kaiser

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674002722

Category: History

Page: 439

View: 4706

David Kaiser looks at four hundred years of modern European history to find the political causes of general war in four distinct periods (1559âe"1659, 1661âe"1713, 1792âe"1815, and 1914âe"1945). He shows how war became a natural function of politics, a logical consequence of contemporary political behavior. Rather than fighting simply to expand, states in each war fought for specific political and economic reasons. The book illustrates the extraordinary power of politics and war in modern Western civilization, if not in history as a whole. In a provocative and original new preface and chapter, Kaiser shows which aspects of four past areas of conflict do, and do not, seem relevant to the immediate future, and he sketches out some new possibilities for Europe.

The Origins of the First World War

Author: William Mulligan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521886333

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1880

A new interpretation of the origins of World War I that synthesises recent scholarship and introduces the major historiographical and political debates surrounding the outbreak of the war. It examines key issues, providing a clear account of relations between the great powers, disintegrating empires, and the role of smaller states.

The Great War

An Imperial History

Author: John Howard Morrow

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415204408

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5449

Includes index . bibliography, p. [333] - 347.

A History of Denmark

Author: Knud J. V. Jespersen

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 0230345425

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 2262

The history of modern Denmark is essentially the story of how a once extensive and diverse empire slowly fragmented under the changing circumstances of the times. In this introductory guide, Knud J. V. Jespersen traces the process of disintegration and reduction which helped to form the modern Danish state, and the historical roots of Denmark's international position. Beginning with the Reformation in the sixteenth century, Jespersen explains how the Denmark of today was shaped by wars, territorial losses, domestic upheavals, new methods of production, and changes in thought. Thoroughly revised and updated in light of the most recent research, this second edition includes new discussions of the Danish Enlightenment, Denmark's role in World War II, the Cartoon Crisis of 2006 and current NATO debates, bringing the diverse and turbulent history of the country right up to the present day.

Declaring War in Early Modern Europe

Author: F. Baumgartner

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230118895

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 2347

A noteworthy development in recent history has been the disappearance of formal declarations of war. Using primary sources, this book examines the history of declaring war in the early modern era up to the writing of the US Constitution to identify the influence of early modern history on the framing of the Constitution.

Siege Warfare

The Fortress in the Early Modern World 1494-1660

Author: Christopher Duffy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136607870

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2641

This classic text is the first integrated survey of the phenomenon of siege warfare during its most creative period. Duffy demonstrates the implications of the fortress for questions of military organization, strategy, geography, law, architectural values, town life and symbolism and imagination. The book is well illustrated, and will be a valuable companion for enthusiasts of military and architectural history, as well as the general medievalist.

Court Culture and the Origins of a Royalist Tradition in Early Stuart England

Author: R. Malcolm Smuts

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812216967

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 8274

Court Culture and the Origins of a Royalist Tradition in Early Stuart England R. Malcolm Smuts "The sharpest feature of this book is that it takes poetry, pictures, and architecture seriously by seeing these as major items of historical testimony. . . . An engaging and sensitive study."--"American Historical Review" "Smuts's great strength is his grasp of the politics of the age. . . . At every point he is able to buttress his arguments about Charles I's 'cultural policy' by reference to Charles's social, economic, and foreign policy."--"Journal of Modern History" "The book's virtues are numerous. Smuts, a historian, has read widely, pulling together much valuable information while offering intelligent insights of his own. . . . Particularly valuable is the book's emphasis on the social and factional complexity of the court and thus of the art it produced and consumed."--"Sixteenth Century Journal" "Smuts's book deserves a wide readership. Provocative in the best sense of the word, it challenges the reader at every turn and offers a running commentary on possibilities for future research."--"Journal of British Studies" In this work R. Malcolm Smuts examines the fundamental cultural changes that occurred within the English royal court between the last decade of the sixteenth century and the outbreak of the Civil War in 1642. R. Malcolm Smuts is Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He is editor of "The Stuart Court and Europe: Essays in Politics and Political Culture" and author of "Culture and Power in England, ca. 1585-1685." 1987 - 336 pages - 6 x 9 - 30 illus. ISBN 978-0-8122-1696-7 - Paper - $24.95s - 16.50 World Rights - History, Cultural Studies, Fine Arts"