The Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom

The Chumash of the Channel Islands

Author: Jeanne E. Arnold

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 625

Annotation A new series of reprints, monographs, and edited volumes on the anthropology and prehistory of Pacific North America. The series will include works from the coastal and riverine regions of Alaska to California.

Household Archaeology on the Northwest Coast

Author: Elizabeth A. Sobel

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 482

Since the late 1970s, household archaeology has become a key theoretical and methodological framework for research on the development of permanent social inequality and complexity, as well as for understanding the social, political and economic organization of chiefdoms and states. This volume is the cumulative result of more than a decade of research focusing on household archaeology as a means to gain understanding of the evolution of social complexity, regardless of underlying economy.

Across a Great Divide

Continuity and Change in Native North American Societies, 1400-1900

Author: K. G Tregonning

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 103

View: 382

Archaeological research is uniquely positioned to show how native history and native culture affected the course of colonial interaction, but to do so it must transcend colonialist ideas about Native American technological and social change. This book applies that insight to five hundred years of native history. Using data from a wide variety of geographical, temporal, and cultural settings, the contributors examine economic, social, and political stability and transformation in indigenous societies before and after the advent of Europeans and document the diversity of native colonial experiences. The book’s case studies range widely, from sixteenth-century Florida, to the Great Plains, to nineteenth-century coastal Alaska. The contributors address a series of interlocking themes. Several consider the role of indigenous agency in the processes of colonial interaction, paying particular attention to gender and status. Others examine the ways long-standing native political economies affected, and were in turn affected by, colonial interaction. A third group explores colonial-period ethnogenesis, emphasizing the emergence of new native social identities and relations after 1500. The book also highlights tensions between the detailed study of local cases and the search for global processes, a recurrent theme in postcolonial research. If archaeologists are to bridge the artificial divide separating history from prehistory, they must overturn a whole range of colonial ideas about American Indians and their history. This book shows that empirical archaeological research can help replace long-standing models of indigenous culture change rooted in colonialist narratives with more nuanced, multilinear models of change—and play a major role in decolonizing knowledge about native peoples.

Across a Great Divide

Continuity and Change in Native North American Societies, 1400-1900

Author: Laura L. Scheiber

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 342

View: 407

Archaeological research is uniquely positioned to show how native history and native culture affected the course of colonial interaction, but to do so it must transcend colonialist ideas about Native American technological and social change. This book applies that insight to five hundred years of native history. Using data from a wide variety of geographical, temporal, and cultural settings, the contributors examine economic, social, and political stability and transformation in indigenous societies before and after the advent of Europeans and document the diversity of native colonial experiences. The bookÕs case studies range widely, from sixteenth-century Florida, to the Great Plains, to nineteenth-century coastal Alaska. The contributors address a series of interlocking themes. Several consider the role of indigenous agency in the processes of colonial interaction, paying particular attention to gender and status. Others examine the ways long-standing native political economies affected, and were in turn affected by, colonial interaction. A third group explores colonial-period ethnogenesis, emphasizing the emergence of new native social identities and relations after 1500. The book also highlights tensions between the detailed study of local cases and the search for global processes, a recurrent theme in postcolonial research. If archaeologists are to bridge the artificial divide separating history from prehistory, they must overturn a whole range of colonial ideas about American Indians and their history. This book shows that empirical archaeological research can help replace long-standing models of indigenous culture change rooted in colonialist narratives with more nuanced, multilinear models of changeÑand play a major role in decolonizing knowledge about native peoples.

California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 507

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

Saints and Citizens

Indigenous Histories of Colonial Missions and Mexican California

Author: Lisbeth Haas

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 579

Saints and Citizens is a bold new excavation of the history of Indigenous people in California in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, showing how the missions became sites of their authority, memory, and identity. Shining a forensic eye on colonial encounters in Chumash, Luiseño, and Yokuts territories, Lisbeth Haas depicts how native painters incorporated their cultural iconography in mission painting and how leaders harnessed new knowledge for control in other ways. Through her portrayal of highly varied societies, she explores the politics of Indigenous citizenship in the independent Mexican nation through events such as the Chumash War of 1824, native emancipation after 1826, and the political pursuit of Indigenous rights and land through 1848.

The Archaeology and Historical Ecology of Late Holocene San Miguel Island

Author: Torben C. Rick

Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 180

View: 327

California's northern Channel Islands have one of the longest and best-preserved archaeological records in the Americas, spanning some 13,000 calendar years. When European explorers first traveled to the area, these islands were inhabited by the Chumash, some of the most populous and culturally complex hunter-gatherers known. Chumash society was characterized by hereditary leaders, sophisticated exchange networks and interaction spheres, and diverse maritime economies. Focusing on the archaeology of five sites dated to the last 3,000 years, this book examines the archaeology and historical ecology of San Miguel Island, the westernmost and most isolated of the northern Channel Islands. Detailed faunal, artifact, and other data are woven together in a diachronic analysis that investigates the interplay of social and ecological developments on this unique island. The first to focus solely on San Miguel Island archaeology, this book examines issues ranging from coastal adaptations to emergent cultural complexity to historical ecology and human impacts on ancient environments.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 940

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology is a guide for the design of archaeological experiments for both students and scholars. Experimental archaeology provides a unique opportunity to corroborate conclusions with multiple trials of repeatable experiments and can provide data otherwise unavailable to archaeologists without damaging sites, remains, or artifacts. Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture-ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology-detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures and are placed in a theoretical context, and contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. The field has long been in need of a guide that focuses on methodology and design. This book fills that need not only for undergraduate and graduate students but for any archaeologist looking to begin an experimental research project.

Socialising Complexity

Structure, Interaction and Power in Archaeological Discourse

Author: Sheila Kohring

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 608

Table of Contents Socialising Complexity : Structure, Interaction and Power in Archaeological Discourse by Kohring, Sheila (Editor, Author); Wynne-Jones, Stephanie (Editor, Author) Terms of Use Part I The Complexity Concept p. 1 1 Socialising Complexity Stephanie Wynne-Jones and Sheila Kohring p. 2 2 Evolution, Complexity and the State Robert Chapman p. 13 Part II The Organisation of Society p. 29 3 Notes on a New Paradigm Carole Crumley p. 30 4 Social complexity is not the same as hierarchy Stella Souvatzi p. 37 5 The Rules of the Game. Decentralised Complexity and Power Structures Kristian Kristiansen p. 60 6 The state they were in: community, continuity and change in the north-central Andes, 1000-1608 AD Kevin Lane p. 76 Part III Complexity Through Practice p. 99 7 Materialising ‘complex’ social relationships: Technology, production and consumption in a Copper Age Community Sheila Kohring and Carlos P. Odriozola and Victor M. Hurtado p. 100 8 Settings and symbols: assessing complexity in the pre-Hispanic Andes Elizabeth DeMarrais p. 118 Part IV Complexity and Landscape p. 141 9 Multiple landscapes and layered meanings: scale, interaction and process in the development of a Swahili town Stephanie Wynne-Jones p. 142 10 Social landscapes and community identity: the social organisation of space in the north-central Andes Alexander Herrera p. 161 11 Taking the Bight out of complexity: elaborating interior landscapes within South-Central California David W. Robinson p. 186 Part V Encountering Complexity p. 209 12 Creating Complexity: the example of the Muisca of Colombia Monica J. Giedelmann Reyes p. 210 13 The decentralised state: nomads, complexity and sociotechnical systems in Inner Asia David Sneath p. 228 Descriptive content provided by SyndeticsTM, a Bowker service. Summary Socialising Complexity : Structure, Interaction and Power in Archaeological Discourse by Kohring, Sheila (Editor, Author); Wynne-Jones, Stephanie (Editor, Author) Terms of use Socialising Complexity: Structure, Interaction and Power in Archaeological Discourse introduces complexity as a conceptual tool, rather than a category, for understanding social formations. This new approach moves beyond traditional concerns with what constitutes a complex society and focuses instead on the complexity inherent in every society through its particular structuring principles. Descriptive content provided by SyndeticsTM, a Bowker service.