The Origin and Prevention of Major Wars

Author: Robert I. Rotberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 965

Since the development of the modern state system in Europe four centuries ago, there have been ten general wars involving a majority of the major powers and a high level of casualties. Another major war is difficult to conceive of, since it would presumably be the last such conflict, and yet it is not an impossibility. In this volume a distinguished group of political scientists and historians examine the origins of major wars and discuss the problems in preventing a nuclear war.

The Waning of Major War

Theories and Debates

Author: Raimo Vayrynen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 985

This book is a systematic effort by leading international scholars to map the trends in major-power warfare and explore whether it is waxing or waning. The main point of departure is that major-power war as a historical institution is in decline. This does not mean, though, that wars between states are in general disappearing. While there is some convergence in the conclusions by individual authors, they are by no means unanimous about the trend. The articles explore different causes and correlates of the declining trend in major-power warfare, including the impact of the international structure, nuclear weapons, international law, multilateral institutions, sovereignty and value changes.

The Origins of Major War

Author: Dale C. Copeland

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 895

Copeland asks why governments make decisions that lead to, sustain, and intensify conflicts, drawing on detailed historical narratives of several twentieth-century cases, including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War.

Realism

Restatements and Renewal

Author: Benjamin Frankel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 461

Realism has been the subject of critical scrutiny for some time and this examination aims to identify and define its strengths and shortcomings, making a contribution to the study of international relations.

Great Power Peace and American Primacy

The Origins and Future of a New International Order

Author: J. Baron

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 261

View: 388

This book explains the period of great power peace in the last fifty years and outlines the path to perpetuating it. Drawing on the Realist tradition and challenging conventional wisdom about the causes of American primacy, Baron explores contributions to peace made by the balance of power, nuclear weapons, democracy and globalization.

International Relations

A Beginner's Guide

Author: Charles Jones

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 480

Today, more than ever, we are buffeted by forces that originate from beyond our shores. Whether it’s war, economics, politics, or law, we live in a global world influenced by a complex landscape of international transactions. Esteemed academic Charles Jones ably provides the building blocks to understand the history of these interactions, outlining all the key actors — from the United States and China to the IMF and Google — and the competing theories that attempt to explain them. Arguing that the strength of international relations lies in its contradictions — it’s not a single discipline but a fascinating mess of history, politics, economics, sociology, law, anthropology, and cultural studies — this guide provides a lively discussion of the limitations of the field, as well as an explanation of why it is so essential. Covering globalization, conflict, history, and theory, this is the perfect primer for students of international relations, workers in an international context, and citizens across the globe.

Why Wars Happen

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 944

Why Wars Happen is a groundbreaking inquiry into the crucial yet surprisingly understudied question of why wars occur. Jeremy Black, one of Britain's foremost military historians, presents an interdisciplinary study that draws on subjects such as history, political science, and international relations and marshals a vast range of material with global examples spanning from the fifteenth century to today. Black examines several major modern wars in their historical contexts, taking into account cultural differences and various conflict theories. He analyzes the three main types of war—between cultures, within cultures, and civil—and explores the problems of defining war. Black's investigation inspires fascinating questions such as: Do wars reflect the bellicosity in societies and states, or do they largely arise as a result of a diplomatic breakdown? How closely is war linked to changes in the nature of warfare, the international system, or the internal character of states? Black also considers contemporary situations and evaluates the possible course of future wars. Offering a valuable and thought-provoking analysis on the causes of war and conflicts, Why Wars Happen will interest historians and readers of military history alike.

New Global Dangers

Changing Dimensions of International Security

Author: Michael Edward Brown

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 552

View: 111

An analysis of new global security concerns in the post-September 11 world, including weapons of mass destruction, nonmilitary dangers, and transnational actors.

Capturing the Complexity of Conflict

Dealing with Violent Ethnic Conflicts of the Post-Cold War Era

Author: Dennis J. D. Sandole

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 387

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

What Causes War?

An Introduction to Theories of International Conflict

Author: Greg Cashman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 620

View: 130

Now in a thoroughly revised and updated edition, this classic text presents a comprehensive survey of the many alternative theories that attempt to explain the causes of interstate war. For each theory, Greg Cashman examines the arguments and counterarguments, considers the empirical evidence and counterevidence generated by social-science research, looks at historical applications of the theory, and discusses the theory’s implications for restraining international violence. Cashman examines theories of war at the individual, substate, nation-state, dyadic, and international system levels of analysis. Written in a clear and accessible style, this interdisciplinary text will be essential reading for all students of international relations.