The Little Schemer

Author: Daniel P. Friedman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 196

View: 943

"drawings by Duane Bibby" foreword by Gerald J. Sussman "I learned more about LISP from this book than I have from any of the other LISP books I've read over the years. . . . While other books will tell you the mechanics of LISP, they can leave you largely uninformed on the style of problem-solving for which LISP is optimized. The Little LISPer teaches you how to think in the LISP language. . . an inexpensive, enjoyable introduction." -- Gregg Williams, Byte The notion that "thinking about computing is one of the most exciting things the human mind can do" sets both "The Little Schemer" (formerly known as "The Little LISPer" ) and its new companion volume, "The Seasoned Schemer," apart from other books on LISP. The authors' enthusiasm for their subject is compelling as they present abstract concepts in a humorous and easy-to-grasp fashion. Together, these books will open new doors of thought to anyone who wants to find out what computing is really about. "The Little Schemer" introduces computing as an extension of arithmetic and algebra -- things that everyone studies in grade school and high school. It introduces programs as recursive functions and briefly discusses the limits of what computers can do. The authors use the programming language Scheme, and interesting foods to illustrate these abstract ideas. "The Seasoned Schemer" informs the reader about additional dimensions of computing: functions as values, change of state, and exceptional cases. "The Little LISPer" has been a popular introduction to LISP for many years. It had appeared in French and Japanese. "The Little Schemer" and "The SeasonedSchemer" are worthy successors and will prove equally popular as textbooks for Scheme courses as well as companion texts for any complete introductory course in Computer Science. Download DrScheme - a graphical environment for developing Scheme programs

The Reasoned Schemer

Author: Daniel P. Friedman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 169

View: 850

The goal of The Reasoned Schemer is to help the functional programmer think logically and the logic programmer think functionally. The authors of The Reasoned Schemer believe that logic programming is a natural extension of functional programming, and they demonstrate this by extending the functional language Scheme with logical constructs -- thereby combining the benefits of both styles. The extension encapsulates most of the ideas in the logic programming language Prolog. The pedagogical method of The Reasoned Schemer is a series of questions and answers, which proceed with the characteristic humor that marked The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer. Familiarity with a functional language or with the first eight chapters of The Little Schemer is assumed. Adding logic capabilities required the introduction of new forms. The authors' goal is to show to what extent writing logic programs is the same as writing functional programs using these forms. In this way, the reader of The Reasoned Schemer will come to understand how simple logic programming is and how easy it is to define functions that behave like relations.

A++ The Smallest Programming Language in the World

An Educational Programming Language

Author: Georg P. Loczewski

Publisher: tredition

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 292

View: 552

A++ has been developed in 2002 in the context of 'Programmierung pur' [Undiluted Programming] (ISBN 3-87820-108-7) with the purpose to serve as a learning instrument rather than as a programming language used to solve practical problems. A++ is supposed to be an efficient tool to become familiar with the core of programming and with programming patterns that can be applied in other languages needed to face the real world. This book does not only introduce A++ as a language, but also covers its implementation in Perl and C including an introduction to these languages using A++ itself. The book also contains an introduction to the Lambda-Calculus of Alonzo Church, which represents the theoretical foundation of A++.

The Flyleaf

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Academic libraries

Page:

View: 490

The Little Prover

Author: Daniel P. Friedman

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 248

View: 975

An introduction to writing proofs about computer programs, written in an accessible question-and-answer style, complete with step-by-step examples and a simple proof assistant.

A Little Java, a Few Patterns

Author: Matthias Felleisen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 179

View: 1000

foreword by Ralph E. Johnson and drawings by Duane Bibby 'This is a book of 'why' not 'how.' If you are interested in the nature of computation and curious about the very idea behind object orientation, this book is for you. This book will engage your brain (if not your tummy). Through its sparkling interactive style, you will learn about three essential OO concepts: interfaces, visitors, and factories. A refreshing change from the 'yet another Java book' phenomenon. Every serious Java programmer should own a copy.' -- Gary McGraw, Ph.D., Research Scientist at Reliable Software Technologies and coauthor of Java Security Java is a new object-oriented programming language that was developed by Sun Microsystems for programming the Internet and intelligent appliances. In a very short time it has become one of the most widely used programming languages for education as well as commercial applications. Design patterns, which have moved object-oriented programming to a new level, provide programmers with a language to communicate with others about their designs. As a result, programs become more readable, more reusable, and more easily extensible. In this book, Matthias Felleisen and Daniel Friedman use a small subset of Java to introduce pattern-directed program design. With their usual clarity and flair, they gently guide readers through the fundamentals of object-oriented programming and pattern-based design. Readers new to programming, as well as those with some background, will enjoy their learning experience as they work their way through Felleisen and Friedman's dialogue. src='/graphics/yellowball.gif' href='/books/FELTP/Java-fm.html'Foreword and Preface

Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in Java, Third Edition

Author: Clifford A. Shaffer

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 608

View: 651

Comprehensive treatment focuses on creation of efficient data structures and algorithms and selection or design of data structure best suited to specific problems. This edition uses Java as the programming language.

How to Design Programs

An Introduction to Programming and Computing

Author: Matthias Felleisen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 693

View: 924

Processing simple forms of data - Processing arbitrarily large data - More on processing arbitrarily large data - Abstracting designs - Generative recursion - Changing the state of variables - Changing compound values.

The Little LISPer

Author: Daniel P. Friedman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: LISP (Computer program language)

Page: 58

View: 725

There are surprises in store for the diligent reader of this masterful introduction to recursion as a fundamental tool for expressing and solving problems. With wit and wisdom, The Little LISPer unfolds some of the most beautiful concepts in mathematics, computer science, and logic. The authors' goal is to show that recursive thinking is first of all fun, that it is powerful, and that the programming language Lisp allows one to express ideas recursively and naturally. There are hard problems along the way, but their solution brings mastery of recursive, functional, and meta-linguistic abstractions, developing skills in the underlying creative programming in Lisp. The Little LISPer is self-contained: an interpreter for the language is developed using the tools of the book itself .