The King's Revenge: Charles II and the Greatest Manhunt in British History

Author: Don Jordan,Michael Walsh

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681772027

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4672

Set in an age of intrigue and espionage, this is the story of the greatest manhunt in British history: the quest for retribution upon the traitors who brought about the death of Charles I. When Charles I was executed, his son Charles II made it his role to seek out retribution, producing the biggest manhunt Britain had ever seen, one that would span Europe and America and would last for thirty years. "We shall pursue and bring to their due punishment those bloody traitors who were either actors or contrivers of that unparalleled and inhuman murder." So vowed the nineteen-year-old Prince of Wales, following the beheading of his father Charles I in January 1649. From exile, he instigated what became the biggest manhunt the nation had ever seen, spreading out across Europe and America and lasting for over thirty years. When he ascended to the throne in 1660 as Charles II, his search for revenge intensified, with show trials in London and assassination squads scouring foreign countries. Many of the most senior figures in England were hanged, drawn and quartered; imprisoned for life; or consigned to a self-imposed exile, in constant fear of the assassin's bullet. History has painted the regicides and their supporters as fanatics, but among them were exceptional men, including John Milton, poetic genius and political propagandist; Oliver Cromwell's steely son-in-law, Henry Ireton; and the errant son of an earl, Algernon Sidney, whose writings helped inspire the founders of the American Revolution. Cromwell himself was subjected to the most bizarre symbolic revenge when—though long-dead—his body was disinterred and beheaded. Set in an age of intrigue and betrayal, The King's Revenge brings these remarkable figures vividly to life in an engrossing tale of ambition, double agents, and espionage.

The King's Revenge

Charles II and the Greatest Manhunt in British History

Author: Michael Walsh,Don Jordan

Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group

ISBN: 0748126546

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7751

When Charles I was executed, his son Charles II made it his role to search out retribution, producing the biggest manhunt Britain had ever seen, one that would span Europe and America and would last for thirty years. Men who had once been among the most powerful figures in England ended up on the scaffold, on the run, or in fear of the assassin's bullet. History has painted the regicides and their supporters as fanatical Puritans, but among them were remarkable men, including John Milton and Oliver Cromwell. Don Jordan and Michael Walsh bring these remarkable figures and this astonishing story vividly to life an engrossing, bloody tale of plots, spies, betrayal, fear and ambition.

The King's Revenge

Charles II and the Greatest Manhunt in British History

Author: Michael Walsh,Don Jordan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0748126546

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1652

When Charles I was executed, his son Charles II made it his role to search out retribution, producing the biggest manhunt Britain had ever seen, one that would span Europe and America and would last for thirty years. Men who had once been among the most powerful figures in England ended up on the scaffold, on the run, or in fear of the assassin's bullet. History has painted the regicides and their supporters as fanatical Puritans, but among them were remarkable men, including John Milton and Oliver Cromwell. Don Jordan and Michael Walsh bring these remarkable figures and this astonishing story vividly to life an engrossing, bloody tale of plots, spies, betrayal, fear and ambition.

Killers of the King

The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I

Author: Charles Spencer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620409135

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8089

On August 18, 1648, with no relief from the siege in sight, the royalist garrison holding Colchester Castle surrendered and Oliver Cromwell's army firmly ended the rule of Charles I of England. To send a clear message to the fallen monarch, the rebels executed four of the senior officers captured at the castle. Yet still the king refused to accept he had lost the war. As France and other allies mobilized in support of Charles, a tribunal was hastily gathered and a death sentence was passed. On January 30, 1649, the King of England was executed. This is the account of the fifty-nine regicides, the men who signed Charles I's death warrant. Recounting a little-known corner of British history, Charles Spencer explores what happened when the Restoration arrived. From George Downing, the chief plotter, to Richard Ingoldsby, who claimed he was forced to sign his name by his cousin Oliver Cromwell, and from those who returned to the monarchist cause and betrayed their fellow regicides to those that fled the country in an attempt to escape their punishment, Spencer examines the long-lasting, far-reaching consequences not only for those who signed the warrant, but also for those who were present at the trial, and for England itself. A powerful tale of revenge from the dark heart of England's past, and a unique contribution to seventeenth-century history, Killers of the King tells the incredible story of the men who dared to assassinate a monarch.

The King's Bed

Sex, Power and the Court of Charles II

Author: Don Jordan,Michael Walsh

Publisher: Abacus

ISBN: 9781408704905

Category:

Page: 368

View: 5587

To refer to the private life of Charles II is to abuse the adjective. His personal life was anything but private. His amorous liaisons were largely conducted in royal palaces surrounded by friends, courtiers and literally hundreds of servants and soldiers. Gossip radiated throughout the kingdom. Charles spent most of his wealth and his intellect on gaining and keeping the company of women, from the lowest sections of society such as the actress Nell Gwyn to the aristocratic Louise de Kérouaille. Some of Charles' women played their part in the affairs of state, colouring the way the nation was run. Don Jordan and Michael Walsh take us inside Charles' palace, where we will meet court favourites, amusing confidants, advisors jockeying for political power, mistresses past and present as well as key figures in his inner circle such as his 'pimpmasters' and his personal pox doctor. The astonishing private life of Charles II reveals much about the man he was and why he lived and ruled as he did. The King's Bed tells the compelling story of a king ruled by his passion.

To Catch a King

Author: Charles Spencer

Publisher: Collins

ISBN: 9780008225582

Category:

Page: 326

View: 7402

Guided by its various twists and turns, To Catch a King tells the story the manhunt for Charles II, following the rebellion that spurred his father's beheading in 1649. This unputdownable sequel to Killers of the King tells an old story with new eyes, challenging our polarised notions of royalism, nationalism and loyalty.

The Last Royal Rebel

The Life and Death of James, Duke of Monmouth

Author: Anna Keay

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 140884608X

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 1806

James, Duke of Monmouth, the adored illegitimate son of Charles II, was born in exile the year his grandfather was executed and the English monarchy abolished. Abducted from his mother on his father's orders, he emerged from a childhood in the backstreets of Rotterdam to command the ballrooms of Paris, the brothels of Covent Garden and the battlefields of Flanders. Pepys described him as 'the most skittish, leaping gallant that ever I saw, always in action, vaulting or leaping or clambering'. Such was his appeal that when the monarchy itself came under threat, the cry was for Monmouth to succeed Charles II as King. He inspired both delight and disgust, adulation and abhorrence and, in time, love and loyalty almost beyond fathoming. Louis XIV was his mentor, Nell Gwyn his protector, D'Artagnan his lieutenant, William of Orange his confidant, John Dryden his censor and John Locke his comrade. Anna Keay matches rigorous scholarship with a storyteller's gift to enrapturing effect. She brings to life the warm, courageous and handsome Duke of Monmouth, a man who by his own admission 'lived a very dissolute and irregular life', but who was ultimately prepared to risk everything for honour and justice. His life, culminating in his fateful invasion, provides a sweeping history of the turbulent decades in which England as we know it was forged.

The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood: The Spy Who Stole the Crown Jewels and Became the King's Secret Agent

Author: Robert Hutchinson

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681771861

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3838

The gripping story of one of the most enigmatic and alluring figures in British history: a dangerous double agent and Irish rogue in King Charles II's court. One morning in May 1671, a man disguised as a parson daringly attempted to seize the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. Astonishingly, he managed to escape with the regalia and crown before being apprehended. And yet he was not executed for treason. Instead, the king granted him a generous income and he became a familiar strutting figure in the royal court's glittering state apartments. This man was Colonel Thomas Blood, a notorious turncoat and fugitive from justice. Nicknamed the 'Father of all Treasons,' he had been involved in an attempted coup d'etat in Ireland as well as countless plots to assassinate Charles II. In an age when gossip and intrigue ruled the coffee houses, the restored Stuart king decided Blood was more useful to him alive than dead. But while serving as his personal spy, Blood was conspiring with his enemies. At the same time he hired himself out as a freelance agent for those seeking to further their political ambition. In The Audacious Crimes of Colonel Blood, bestselling historian Robert Hutchinson paints a vivid portrait of a double agent bent on ambiguous political and personal motivation, and provides an extraordinary account of the perils and conspiracies that abounded in Restoration England.

The King's City

Author: Don Jordan,Michael Walsh

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781408707296

Category:

Page: 544

View: 5264

During the reign of Charles II, London was a city in flux. After years of civil war and political turmoil, England's capital became the centre for major advances in the sciences, the theatre, architecture, trade and ship-building that paved the way for the creation of the British Empire. At the heart of this activity was the King, whose return to power from exile in 1660 lit the fuse for an explosion in activity in all spheres of city life. London flourished, its wealth, vibrancy and success due to many figures famous today including Christopher Wren, Samuel Pepys and John Dryden - and others whom history has overlooked until now. Throughout the quarter-century Charles was on the throne, London suffered several serious reverses: the plague in 1665 and the Great Fire in 1666, and severe defeat in the Second Anglo-Dutch War, which brought about notable economic decline. But thanks to the genius and resilience of the people of London, and the occasionally wavering stewardship of the King, the city rose from the ashes to become the economic capital of Europe. The King's City tells the gripping story of a city that defined a nation and birthed modern Britain - and how the vision of great individuals helped to build the richly diverse place we know today.

The Great Escape of Edward Whalley and William Goffe

Smuggled Through Connecticut

Author: Christopher Pagliuco

Publisher: History Press (SC)

ISBN: 9781609493028

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 141

View: 6548

When Puritans Edward Whalley and William Goffe joined the parliamentary army against King Charles I in the English civil wars, they seized an opportunity to overthrow a tyrant. Under their battlefield leadership, the army trounced the Royalist forces and then cut off the king's head. Yet when his son, Charles II, regained the throne, Whalley and Goffe were force to flee to the New England colonies aboard the ship Prudent Mary--never to see their families or England again. Even with the help of New England's Puritan elite, including Reverend John Davenport, they struggled to stay a step ahead of searches for their arrest in Boston, New Haven (where they hid out in Judges Cave) and the outpost of Hadley, Massachusetts. Forced to live as fugitives, these former major generals survived frontier adventures in seventeenth-century New England. Author Christopher Pagliuco reveals the all-but-forgotten stories of these Connecticut heroes.

Jacobites

A New History of the '45 Rebellion

Author: Jacqueline Riding

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608198049

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 8516

The Jacobite Rebellion of 1745-46 is one of the most important turning points in British history--in terms of national crisis every bit the equal of 1066 and 1940. The tale of Charles Edward Stuart, "Bonnie Prince Charlie," and his heroic attempt to regain his grandfather's (James II) crown--remains the stuff of legend: the hunted fugitive, Flora MacDonald, and the dramatic escape over the sea to the Isle of Skye. But the full story--the real history--is even more dramatic, captivating, and revelatory. Much more than a single rebellion, the events of 1745 were part of an ongoing civil war that threatened to destabilize the British nation and its empire. The Bonnie Prince and his army alone, which included a large contingent of Scottish highlanders, could not have posed a great threat. But with the involvement of Britain's perennial enemy, Catholic France, it was a far more dangerous and potentially catastrophic situation for the British crown. With encouragement and support from Louis XV, Charles's triumphant Jacobite army advanced all the way to Derby, a mere 120 miles from London, before a series of missteps ultimately doomed the rebellion to crushing defeat and annihilation at Culloden in April 1746--the last battle ever fought on British soil. Jacqueline Riding conveys the full weight of these monumental years of English and Scottish history as the future course of Great Britain as a united nation was irreversibly altered.

Practical Analysis and Reconstruction of Shooting Incidents, Second Edition

Author: Edward E. Hueske

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 149870767X

Category: Law

Page: 484

View: 710

Practical Analysis and Reconstruction of Shooting Incidents, Second Edition presents a holistic approach to shooting incident analysis and reconstruction, covering the entire spectrum of related sub-disciplines of forensic science. The book reviews basic firearm design and function, ammunition components, and terminology, explaining what constitutes pertinent evidence and appropriate results relative to autopsies, forensic laboratory analysis, and reenactments. The second edition features numerous additions including: Four new chapters Complete and extensive updates to all 16 original chapters Three case studies contributed by renowned professionals in the field New and revised exercises at the ends of chapters, with answers provided An expanded glossary of terminology Nearly 340 figures and illustrations, with several in full color New and updated references and suggested readings Appendices containing relevant terminology, checklists, and other resources The book details the mathematics of shooting reconstruction in clear, precise language that allows readers—both those with and without extensive science backgrounds—to apply a logical thought process to the evaluation of shooting scene evidence in order to establish the probable related events to the shooting incident. This new edition provides up-to-date information for field investigators to recognize, preserve, document, and interpret the physical evidence typically found after shooting incidents. In addition to the hundreds of illustrations, the book uses both case studies and step-by-step outlines to clearly describe the required analytical processes involved in reconstructing and interpreting shooting incident scenes.

Nicholas Van Hoogstraten

Millionaire Killer

Author: Don Jordan,Mike Walsh

Publisher: Blake Pub

ISBN: 9781844540174

Category: True Crime

Page: 277

View: 1690

Nicholas van Hoogstraten is a super-rich business man whose ruthless exploitsave kept his name in the headlines for 30 years. Most recently, he was founduilty of the manslaughter of business associate Mohammed Sabir Raja, who wastabbed five times and shot at point-blank range by hitmen sent byoogstraten. This was the culmination of a career of wreaking vengeance onnyone who dared get in his way. In building a vast fortune, he secretlyinked up with one of the most frightening gangsters in Britain, with aicious regime in Africa and, according to some, collusions with the Mafia.e employed thugs to bomb the home of a man who owed him money. He sent aang to terrorise an old people's home. He was suspected of involvement in anrson attack which killed five party-goers. He threatened friends and rivals even judges - with death. This book reveals the real Van Hoogstraten: hisife, his women, his riches and what exactly has made one man so feared.

Culloden: Scotland's Last Battle and the Forging of the British Empire

Author: Trevor Royle

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681772817

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 2889

A vigorous and authoritative history of last major battle fought between Scottish and English forces, ending all hope of the Stuarts reclaiming the throne and forming the bedrock for the creation of the British Empire. The Battle of Culloden in 1746 has gone down in history as the last major battle fought on British soil: a vicious confrontation between the English Royal Army and the Scottish forces supporting the Stuart claim to the throne. But this wasn't just a conflict between the Scots and the English: the battle was also part of a much larger campaign to protect the British Isles from the growing threat of a French invasion. In Trevor Royle's vivid and evocative narrative, we are drawn into the ranks, on both sides, alongside doomed Jacobites fighting fellow Scots dressed in the red coats of the Duke of Cumberland's Royal Army. And we meet the Duke himself, a skilled warrior who would gain notoriety because of the reprisals on Highland clans in the battle's aftermath. Royle also takes us beyond the battle as the men of the Royal Army, galvanized by its success at Culloden, expand dramatically and start to fight campaigns overseas in America and India in order to secure British interests. We see the revolutionary use of fighting techniques first implemented at Culloden, and we see the creation of professional fighting forces. Culloden changed the course of British history by ending all hope of the Stuarts reclaiming the throne, cementing Hanoverian rule and forming the bedrock for the creation of the British Empire. Royle's lively and provocative history looks afresh at the period and unveils its true significance, not only as the end of a struggle for the throne but the beginning of a new global power.

The Enemy Within

2,000 Years of Witch-hunting in the Western World

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780670019991

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 4659

A cultural history of witch-hunting from the ancient world through the McCarthy era traces the factors that contribute to outbreaks of cultural paranoia and how people were able to accept hysteria-based beliefs about unlikely supernatural powers and occult activities. 35,000 first printing.

Blood of the Celts: The New Ancestral Story

Author: Jean Manco

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

ISBN: 0500772967

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 9046

From prehistory to the present day, an unrivaled look deep into the contentious origins of the Celts Blood of the Celts brings together genetic, archaeological, and linguistic evidence to address the often-debated question: who were the Celts? What peoples or cultural identities should that term describe? And did they in fact inhabit the British Isles before the Romans arrived? Author Jean Manco challenges existing accounts of the origins of the Celts, providing a new analysis that draws on the latest discoveries as well as ancient history. In a novel approach, the book opens with a discussion of early medieval Irish and British texts, allowing the Celts to speak in their own words and voices. It then traces their story back in time into prehistory to their deepest origins and their ancestors, before bringing the narrative forward to the present day. Each chapter also has a useful summary in bullet points to aid the reader and highlight the key facts in the story.

The Tyrannicide Brief

The Story of the Man Who Sent Charles I to the Scaffold

Author: Geoffrey Robertson

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0307492257

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 7051

Charles I waged civil wars that cost one in ten Englishmen their lives. But in 1649 Parliament was hard put to find a lawyer with the skill and daring to prosecute a king who claimed to be above the law. In the end, they chose the radical lawyer John Cooke, whose Puritan conscience, political vision, and love of civil liberties gave him the courage to bring the king to trial. As a result, Charles I was beheaded, but eleven years later Cooke himself was arrested, tried, and executed at the hands of Charles II. Geoffrey Robertson, a renowned human rights lawyer, provides a vivid new reading of the tumultuous Civil War years, exposing long-hidden truths: that the king was guilty, that his execution was necessary to establish the sovereignty of Parliament, that the regicide trials were rigged and their victims should be seen as national heroes. Cooke’s trial of Charles I, the first trial of a head of state for waging war on his own people, became a forerunner of the trials of Augusto Pinochet, Slobodan Milosevic, and Saddam Hussein. The Tyrannicide Brief is a superb work of history that casts a revelatory light on some of the most important issues of our time. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Persian Fire

Author: Tom Holland

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307386984

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6822

A "fresh...thrilling" (The Guardian) account of the Graeco-Persian Wars. In the fifth century B.C., a global superpower was determined to bring truth and order to what it regarded as two terrorist states. The superpower was Persia, incomparably rich in ambition, gold, and men. The terrorist states were Athens and Sparta, eccentric cities in a poor and mountainous backwater: Greece. The story of how their citizens took on the Great King of Persia, and thereby saved not only themselves but Western civilization as well, is as heart-stopping and fateful as any episode in history. Tom Holland’s brilliant study of these critical Persian Wars skillfully examines a conflict of critical importance to both ancient and modern history.

To the Heart of the Nile

Lady Florence Baker and the Exploration of Central Africa

Author: Pat Shipman

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 9780061849855

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 562

In 1859, at age fourteen, Florence Szász stood before a room full of men and waited to be auctioned to the highest bidder. But slavery and submission were not to be her destiny: Sam Baker, a wealthy English gentleman and eminent adventurer, was moved by compassion and an immediate, overpowering empathy for the young woman, and braved extraordinary perils to help her escape. Together, Florence and Sam -- whose love would remain passionate and constant throughout their lives -- forged into literally uncharted territory in a glorious attempt to unravel a mysterious and magnificent enigma called Africa. A stunning achievement, To the Heart of the Nile is an unforgettable portrait of an unforgettable woman: a story of discovery, bravery, determination, and love, meticulously reconstructed through journals, documents, and private papers, and told in the inimitable narrative style that has already won Pat Shipman resounding international acclaim.

The Year of Fear

Machine Gun Kelly and the Manhunt That Changed the Nation

Author: Joe Urschel

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1250020808

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 308

View: 2572

It's 1933 and Prohibition has given rise to the American gangster--now infamous names like Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger. Bank robberies at gunpoint are commonplace and kidnapping for ransom is the scourge of a lawless nation. With local cops unauthorized to cross state lines in pursuit and no national police force, safety for kidnappers is just a short trip on back roads they know well from their bootlegging days. Gangster George "Machine Gun" Kelly and his wife, Kathryn, are some of the most celebrated criminals of the Great Depression. With gin-running operations facing extinction and bank vaults with dwindling stores of cash, Kelly sets his sights on the easy-money racket of kidnapping. His target: rich oilman, Charles Urschel. Enter J. Edgar Hoover, a desperate Justice Department bureaucrat who badly needs a successful prosecution to impress the new administration and save his job. Hoover's agents are given the sole authority to chase kidnappers across state lines and when Kelly bungles the snatch job, Hoover senses his big opportunity. What follows is a thrilling 20,000 mile chase over the back roads of Depression-era America, crossing 16 state lines, and generating headlines across America along the way--a historical mystery/thriller for the ages. Joe Urschel's The Year of Fear is a thrilling true crime story of gangsters and lawmen and how an obscure federal bureaucrat used this now legendary kidnapping case to launch the FBI.