The Jewish Bible

A Material History

Author: David Stern

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 029574149X

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 9011

In The Jewish Bible: A Material History, David Stern explores the Jewish Bible as a material object�the Bibles that Jews have actually held in their hands�from its beginnings in the Ancient Near Eastern world through to the Middle Ages to the present moment. Drawing on the most recent scholarship on the history of the book, Stern shows how the Bible has been not only a medium for transmitting its text�the word of God�but a physical object with a meaning of its own. That meaning has changed, as the material shape of the Bible has changed, from scroll to codex, and from manuscript to printed book. By tracing the material form of the Torah, Stern demonstrates how the process of these transformations echo the cultural, political, intellectual, religious, and geographic changes of the Jewish community. With tremendous historical range and breadth, this book offers a fresh approach to understanding the Bible�s place and significance in Jewish culture.

Recent Archaeological Discoveries and Biblical Research

Author: William G. Dever

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295801026

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 2511

Archaeology and Bible--two simple terms, often used together, understood by everybody. But are they understood properly? If so, why are both subject to such controversy? And what can archaeology contribute to our understanding of the Bible? These are the problems addressed by Professor Dever in this book. Dever first looks at the nature and recent development of both archaeology and Biblical studies, and then lays the groundwork for a new a productive relationship between these two disciplines. His �case studies� are three eras in Israelite history: the period of settlement in Canaan, the period of the United Monarchy, and the period of religious development, chiefly during the Divided Monarchy. In each case Dever explores by means of recent discoveries what archaeology, couples with textual study, can contribute to the illumination of the life and times of ancient Israel. Given the flood of new information that has come from recent archaeological discoveries, Dever has chosen to draw evidence largely from excavations and surveys done in Israel in the last ten years--many still unpublished--concerning archaeology and the Old Testament. Dever�s work not only brings the reader up to date on recent archaeological discoveries as they pertain to the Hebrew Bible, but indeed goes further in offering an original interpretation of the relationship between the study of the Bible and the uncovering of the material culture of the ancient Near East. Extensive notes, plus the use of much new and/or unpublished data, will make the volume useful to graduate students and professors in the fields of Biblical studies and Syro-Palestinian archaeology, and the seminarians, pastors, rabbis, and others. This book provides stimulating, provocative, and often controversial reading as well as a compendium of valuable insights and marginalia that symbolizes the state of the art of Biblical archaeology today.

Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity

Conflict or Confluence?

Author: Lee I. Levine

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295803827

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 9862

Generations of scholars have debated the influence of Greco-Roman culture on Jewish society and the degree of its impact on Jewish material culture and religious practice in Palestine and the Diaspora of antiquity. Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity examines this phenomenon from the aftermath of Alexander�s conquest to the Byzantine era, offering a balanced view of the literary, epigraphical, and archeological evidence attesting to the process of Hellenization in Jewish life and its impact on several aspects of Judaism as we know it today. Lee Levine approaches this broad subject in three essays, each focusing on diverse issues in Jewish culture: Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period, rabbinic tradition, and the ancient synagogue. With his comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the intricate dynamics of the Jewish and Greco-Roman societies, the author demonstrates the complexities of Hellenization and its role in shaping many aspects of Jewish life�economic, social, political, cultural, and religious. He argues against oversimplification and encourages a more nuanced view, whereby the Jews of antiquity survived and prospered, despite the social and political upheavals of this era, emerging as perpetuators of their own Jewish traditions while open to change from the outside world.

Parables in Midrash

Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature

Author: David Stern

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674654488

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 4977

David Stern shows how the parable or mashal - the most distinctive type of narrative in midrash - was composed, how its symbolism works, and how it serves to convey the ideological convictions of the rabbis. He describes its relation to similar tales in other literatures, including the parables of Jesus in the New Testament and kabbalistic parables. Through its innovative approach to midrash, this study reaches far beyond its particular subject, and should appeal to all readers interested in narrative and religion.

Zakhor

Jewish History and Jewish Memory

Author: Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi

Publisher: UBS Publishers' Distributors

ISBN: 9780295975191

Category: Religion

Page: 154

View: 9266

“Mr. Yerushalmi’s previous writings . . . established him as one of the Jewish community’s most important historians. His latest book should establish him as one of its most important critics. Zakhor is historical thinking of a very high order - mature speculation based on massive scholarship.” - New York Times Book Review

Babatha's Orchard

The Yadin Papyri and an Ancient Jewish Family Tale Retold

Author: Philip F. Esler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198767161

Category:

Page: 288

View: 4470

In 1961 archaeologists discovered a family archive of legal papyri in a cave near the Dead Sea where their owner, the Jewish woman Babatha, had hidden them in 135 CE at the end of the Bar Kokhba revolt. Babatha's Orchard analyzes the oldest four of these papyri to argue that underlying them isa hitherto undetected and surprising train of events concerning how Babatha's father, Shim'on, purchased a date-palm orchard in Maoza on the southern shore of the Dead Sea in 99 CE that he later gave to Babatha.The central features of the story, untold for two millennia, relate to how a high Nabatean official had purchased the orchard only a month before, but suddenly rescinded the purchase, and how Shim'on then acquired it, in enlarged form, from the vendor. Teasing out the details involves deploying thenew methodology of archival ethnography, combined with a fresh scrutiny of the papyri (written in Nabatean Aramaic), to investigate the Nabatean and Jewish individuals mentioned and their relationships within the social, ethnic, economic, and political realities of Nabatea at that time. Aspects ofthis context which are thrown into sharp relief by Babatha's Orchard include: the prominence of wealthy Nabatean women and their husbands' financial reliance on them; the high returns and steep losses possible in date cultivation; the sophistication of Nabatean law and lawyers; the lingering effectof the Nabateans' nomadic past in lessening the social distance between elite and non-elite; and the good ethnic relations between Nabateans and Jews.

A Mediterranean Society: Economic foundations

Author: S. D. Goitein

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520221581

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 550

View: 1619

"One of the best comprehensive histories of a culture in this century."--Amos Funkenstein, Stanford University

How Jewish is Jewish History?

Author: Murray Jay Rosman

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 866

With great vigour and from the vantage point of long experience of writing and teaching Jewish history, Moshe Rosman treats the key questions that postmodernism raises for the writing of Jewish history.What is the relationship between Jewish culture and history and those of the non-Jews among whom Jews live? Can we-in the light of postmodernist thought-speak of a continuous, coherent Jewish People, with a distinct culture and history? What in fact is Jewish cultural history, and how can it be written? How does gender transform the Jewish historical narrative? How does Jewish history fit into the multicultural paradigm? Has Jewish history entered a postmodern phase? How can Jewish history utilize the methodologies of other disciplines to accomplish its task? All these are questions that Jewish historians need to think about if their work is to be taken seriously by mainstream historians and intellectuals, or indeed by educated Jews interested in understanding their own cultural and historical past. While engaging with the questions raised by postmodernists, the author adopts a critical stance towards their work. His basic claim is that it is possible to incorporate, judiciously, postmodern innovations into historical scholarship that is still based on documentary research and critical analysis. The resulting endeavor might be termed 'a reformed positivism'. Rosman presents a concentrated, coherent, cogent argument as to what considerations must be brought to bear on the writing of Jewish history today. By highlighting in one book the issues raised by postmodernism, How Jewish is Jewish History? provides those in the field with a foundation from which to discuss how it should be practiced in light of this generation's challenges. It is a valuable resource for students of Jewish history and historiography and a handy tool for scholars who must confront the issues aired here in their own more narrowly focused scholarly works.

Recent Archaeological Discoveries and Biblical Research

Author: William G. Dever

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295801026

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 8250

Archaeology and Bible--two simple terms, often used together, understood by everybody. But are they understood properly? If so, why are both subject to such controversy? And what can archaeology contribute to our understanding of the Bible? These are the problems addressed by Professor Dever in this book. Dever first looks at the nature and recent development of both archaeology and Biblical studies, and then lays the groundwork for a new a productive relationship between these two disciplines. His �case studies� are three eras in Israelite history: the period of settlement in Canaan, the period of the United Monarchy, and the period of religious development, chiefly during the Divided Monarchy. In each case Dever explores by means of recent discoveries what archaeology, couples with textual study, can contribute to the illumination of the life and times of ancient Israel. Given the flood of new information that has come from recent archaeological discoveries, Dever has chosen to draw evidence largely from excavations and surveys done in Israel in the last ten years--many still unpublished--concerning archaeology and the Old Testament. Dever�s work not only brings the reader up to date on recent archaeological discoveries as they pertain to the Hebrew Bible, but indeed goes further in offering an original interpretation of the relationship between the study of the Bible and the uncovering of the material culture of the ancient Near East. Extensive notes, plus the use of much new and/or unpublished data, will make the volume useful to graduate students and professors in the fields of Biblical studies and Syro-Palestinian archaeology, and the seminarians, pastors, rabbis, and others. This book provides stimulating, provocative, and often controversial reading as well as a compendium of valuable insights and marginalia that symbolizes the state of the art of Biblical archaeology today.

Coming of Age in Medieval Egypt

Female Adolescence, Jewish Law, and Ordinary Culture

Author: Eve Krakowski

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400887844

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 1539

Much of what we know about life in the medieval Islamic Middle East comes from texts written to impart religious ideals or to chronicle the movements of great men. How did women participate in the societies these texts describe? What about non-Muslims, whose own religious traditions descended partly from pre-Islamic late antiquity? Coming of Age in Medieval Egypt approaches these questions through Jewish women’s adolescence in Fatimid and Ayyubid Egypt and Syria (c. 969–1250). Using hundreds of everyday papers preserved in the Cairo Geniza, Eve Krakowski follows the lives of girls from different social classes—rich and poor, secluded and physically mobile—as they prepared to marry and become social adults. She argues that the families on whom these girls depended were more varied, fragmented, and fluid than has been thought. Krakowski also suggests a new approach to religious identity in premodern Islamic societies—and to the history of rabbinic Judaism. Through the lens of women’s coming-of-age, she demonstrates that even Jews who faithfully observed rabbinic law did not always understand the world in rabbinic terms. By tracing the fault lines between rabbinic legal practice and its practitioners’ lives, Krakowski explains how rabbinic Judaism adapted to the Islamic Middle Ages. Coming of Age in Medieval Egypt offers a new way to understand how women took part in premodern Middle Eastern societies, and how families and religious law worked in the medieval Islamic world.

The Age of Secrecy

Jews, Christians, and the Economy of Secrets, 1400–1800

Author: Daniel Jütte (Jutte)

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300213425

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 6010

The fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries were truly an Age of Secrecy in Europe, when arcane knowledge was widely believed to be positive knowledge which extended into all areas of daily life. So asserts Daniel Jütte in this engrossing, vivid, and award-winning work. He maintains that the widespread acceptance and even reverence for this “economy of secrets” in premodern Europe created a highly complex and sometimes perilous space for mutual contact between Jews and Christians. Surveying the interactions between the two religious groups in a wide array of secret sciences and practices, the author relates true stories of colorful “professors of secrets” and clandestine encounters. In the process Jütte examines how our current notion of secrecy is radically different in this era of WikiLeaks, Snowden, etc., as opposed to centuries earlier when the truest, most important knowledge was generally considered to be secret by definition.

The Faith of Fallen Jews

Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi and the Writing of Jewish History

Author: David N. Myers,Alexander Kaye

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611684137

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 2699

From his first book, From Spanish Court to Italian Ghetto, to his well-known volume on Jewish memory, Zakhor, to his treatment of Sigmund Freud in Freud's Moses, Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi (1932-2009) earned recognition as perhaps the greatest Jewish historian of his day, whose scholarship blended vast erudition, unfettered creativity, and lyrical beauty. This volume charts his intellectual trajectory by bringing together a mix of classic and lesser-known essays from the whole of his career. The essays in this collection, representative of the range of his writing, acquaint the reader with his research on early modern Spanish Jewry and the experience of crypto-Jews, varied reflections on Jewish history and memory, and Yerushalmi-s enduring interest in the political history of the Jews. Also included are a number of little-known autobiographical recollections, as well as his only published work of fiction.

The Jewish Life Cycle

Rites of Passage from Biblical to Modern Times

Author: Ivan G. Marcus

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295984407

Category: Religion

Page: 370

View: 2033

This original and sweeping review of Jewish culture and history examines how and why various rites and customs celebrating stages of the life cycle have evolved through the ages and persisted to this day.

Torah and Western Thought

Intellectual Portraits of Orthodoxy and Modernity

Author: Meir Y. Soloveichik

Publisher: Maggid

ISBN: 9781592644360

Category:

Page: 346

View: 4161

Even as the twentieth century will be remembered for the West's loss of faith, Jewish Orthodoxy experienced in that very time a golden age of leaders and teachers who sought to bridge the world of Torah and that of the West. Some of these Torah figures were deeply impacted by an academic field, such as philosophy or literature. Others developed a Torah-based perspective on developments within the West, such as the rise of Zionism, democracy, or biotechnology. Still others reflected on the very nature of religious knowledge. The Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva University invited twenty-first century thinkers to paint intellectual portraits of these luminaries, illustrating how each figure bridged the worlds of Torah and the West in a unique way. The essays are meant to inspire Orthodox Jews and all intellectually engaged individuals of faith to learn from the lives of these luminaries, and to have the courage to bridge these worlds as well. Great thinkers examined

The Philosophy of Judaism

The History of Jewish Philosophy from Biblical Times to Franz Rosenzweig

Author: Julius Guttmann

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN: N.A

Category: Jewish philosophy

Page: 464

View: 6546

Bridging the Gap

Ritual and Ritual Texts in the Bible

Author: Gerald A. Klingbeil

Publisher: Eisenbrauns

ISBN: 157506801X

Category: Rites and ceremonies in the Bible

Page: 304

View: 7900

Jews and Christians

Getting Our Stories Straight

Author: Michael Goldberg

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1579107761

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 7812

This fascinating volume offers bold new insights into what it means to be a Christian or a Jew. We are Christians or Jews, Michael Goldberg maintains, not principally because we embrace different creeds, but because we have gained an understanding of the world from one of two distinct master stories - for Jews, the Exodus; for Christians, the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. The author demonstrates what each master story ultimately reveals about who God is, what humanity is, and how humanity should therefore act in God's world.

Haggadah and History

A Panorama in Facsimile of Five Centuries of the Printed Haggadah from the Collections of Harvard University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America

Author: Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi

Publisher: Jewish Publication Society of America

ISBN: 9780827607873

Category: Religion

Page: 494

View: 1161

Haggadah & History is much more than a history of the Passover story. It is also a mirror of the last five centuries in Jewish history as reflected in the haggadah itself. Two hundred facsimile plates reproduce representative pages from rare printed haggadot in two of the world's outstanding Judaica collections: the libraries of Harvard University and The Jewish Theological Seminary. This visual history is complemented by Professor Yerushalmi’s fascinating historical introduction and richly detailed place descriptions. The result is a rare blend of scholarship and art.

Dignity Beyond Death

The Jewish Preparation for Burial

Author: Rochel U. Berman

Publisher: Urim Publications

ISBN: N.A

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 223

View: 3799

In the Jewish tradition, preparation of the dead for burial is undertaken by a community organization known as the Chevra Kadisha, or Sacred Society. Dignity Beyond Death examines these rituals of preparation from the point of view of the volunteers who undertake it. Through personal interviews, the book describes the process of washing, purifying, and dressing the deceased, as well as the recitation of lyrical prayers from Psalms. With chapters on the Holocaust and terrorism, this account will engage readers in the humanity and ultimate dignity of this time-honored practice. Winner of: 2006 Koret Jewish Book Award, Jewish Life & Living category A basic tenet of Judaism is the obligation to value and serve the deceased, to extend dignity beyond death. In Judaism, a death is the affair of the entire community. Preparation of the dead for burial is undertaken by a community organization called the Chevra Kadisha, the Sacred Society. The volunteers of the Sacred Society quietly and privately wash, purify and dress the deceased. They simultaneously recite lyrical prayers from Psalms, thereby bearing witness to death as the last of life's important passages. Dignity Beyond Death examines the rituals of preparing the dead for burial from the point of view of those volunteers who undertake it, including chapters on the Holocaust and terrorism. For the first time, through personal interviews, the author shares a wealth of fascinating anecdotal material that will engage the reader in the humanity and ultimate dignity of this time-honored deed.

Rabbinic Fantasies

Imaginative Narratives from Classical Hebrew Literature

Author: David Stern

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300074024

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 364

View: 5929

This anthology of 16 narratives from ancient and medieval Hebrew texts presents the world of rabbinic storytelling, revealing facets of the Jewish experience and tradition and examining the deep connection between the values of classical Judaism and the art of imaginative narrative writing.