The Invention of Tradition

Author: Eric Hobsbawm

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 616

This book explores examples of this process of invention and addresses the complex interaction of past and present in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism.

The Invention of Tradition

Author: Eric Hobsbawm

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 407

Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparatively recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh and Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial rituals in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. It addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historians and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which poses new questions for the understanding of our history.

Religious Identity and the Invention of Tradition

Papers Read at a NOSTER Conference in Soesterberg, January 4-6, 1999

Author: J. W. van Henten

Publisher: Uitgeverij Van Gorcum

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 367

View: 966

"The present book contains the contributions to the first conference of the Netherlands School for Advanced Studies and Religion (NOSTER) ... The conference theme was inspired by Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger's influential volume, The Invention of Tradition."--Introd., p. [3].

The Invention of Sacred Tradition

Author: James R. Lewis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 306

View: 906

Examines the phenomenon of 'invented traditions' in religions from ancient times to the present day.

Political Islam and the Invention of Tradition

Author: Nicholas P. Roberts

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 268

View: 180

This work provides seeks to foster a better understanding of the multifaceted phenomenon of political Islam, especially in the context of the post-Arab Spring Middle East. The aim of this work is to refute the oft-cited cliche that "Islamists" are hostile to representative and accountable government and seek a return to some distant, barbaric past. To the contrary, many Islamists have made innovative contributions to religiously informed political thought in the Islamic context. In actual fact, no "Islamic state" has ever existed in the history of Islam, and the Islamist conviction that religion and life (state) are inseparable is a highly contested issue. The aim of this work, then, is to illustrate political Islam as an invented tradition. "This study provides both an important and necessary historical contextualization and a clear analysis of the political alternatives in the Middle East and Muslim world in the 21st century. The second decade of the 21st century is emerging as a time of significant change in political and societal institutions in the region. People are speculating about the end of the political order that was created at the end of World War I, and Roberts's analysis provides readers with a good guide to understanding important dimensions of these transformations." -John O. Voll, Professor Emeritus of Islamic History, Georgetown University "Roberts's work is a refreshing contribution to the discourse on Islam and politics. At a time when some societies are plagued by Islamophobia (all over the world - including Muslim societies), the book reveals and uncovers through academic analysis a rich history. This contribution is one of very few that have a solid grounding in both traditions: Western liberal democracy, and Islamic political thought. The author does a remarkable job of simplifying in Islamic traditions concepts that were tackled by other authors in the field, but never so lucidly." -Deina Abdelkader, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell "The importance and value of history tends to elude most Americans. With prescience and clarity, Political Islam and the Invention of Tradition reminds policy makers, analysts, and students of why the study of history is so important for understanding current events, especially in a complicated region such as the Middle East. This book is unique among academic monographs in that, although scholarly in scope, tone, and source material, it has practical, applicable value for those working on issues of foreign policy and public affairs in the Middle East." -F. William Smullen, III, Maxwell Senior Fellow in National Security Studies, Syracuse University. Former Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of State "Mr. Roberts's book provides policy makers with a useful guide for understanding the historical development of Political Islam. Most importantly, it encourages dynamic thinking about this phenomenon and the role it could play in U.S. foreign policy in the future. A must read for policy makers, military, and foreign service officers." -Donald L. Kerrick, Lt. General, United States Army, (Retired). Former Deputy National Security Advisor to President William J. Clinton"

The Highland Myth as an Invented Tradition of 18th and 19th Century and Its Significance for the Image of Scotland

Author: Marco Sievers

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Scotland

Page: 64

View: 832

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 2, University of Hannover, course: Peripheries in British 19th-Century History: Scotland and Ireland, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: Hausarbeit eines PS Kulturwissenschaften, Benotung 2+, abstract: If people around the globe are asked what they associate with Scotland or the Scots, tartan kilts, bagpipes, clans and the Highlands are the most common answers. Especially tourist interest concentrates on these landmarks of Scotland, which are said to be insignias of Scottish tradition, glory and identity, and which dominate the image of Scotland. But are these landmarks really linked to a tradition from times immemorial? Do they really represent a link to Scotland's Gaelic roots? This paper will investigate this question by introducing Eric Hobsbawms term of "invented tradition" to denote and to outline the process of creation of these Scottish symbols. The following portrait of the historical background will show the social, political and economic developments in the 18th and 19th century which led to the invention of tradition as part of the creation of a Highland myth as a result of and as reaction to Scotland's union with England in 1707. Furthermore, the worldwide spreading of the Highland myth, which has determined the image of whole Scotland ever since, will be described. The paper will finish by showing contemporary parallels to the historic developments and trends, and suggesting further topics of investigation.

Industrial Harmony in Modern Japan

The Invention of a Tradition

Author: W. Dean Kinzley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 514

Economic success in Japan has been attributed to the existence of harmonious labour-management relations. This book, first published in 1991, argues that this unique ‘culture of harmony’ was consciously invented and developed over the last century. A semi-bureaucratic organization called the Kyochokai was established in 1919 to meet the needs of an emerging industrial society. It took the lead in trying to define the values which would be suitable for a new Japanese-style industrial culture. The resulting ‘invented’ tradition has played an important role in the evolution and character of Japanese economic values and behaviour.

Ombatse: An Invention of Tradition and Understanding Communal Conflicts in Nasarawa State, Nigeria

Author: J. M. Ayuba

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 435

This book is about the emergence of ombatse, an Eggon ethnic militia in central Nigeria. Ombatse has become an invention by some Eggon people in response to their 'bleak' suffering or 'marginalised' situation in an attempt to effect their 'liberation'. It was initially formed as a political movement but after the outbreak of communal conflict in 2012, it was transformed into an ethnic militia. Ombatse has now become a non-state collective actor that organises violence and the group have been able to overcome the many challenges they have faced, especially raising funds, recruiting members and ensuring that members remain committed.

The Invention of God in Indigenous Societies

Author: James Cox

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 421

Indigenous societies around the world have been historically disparaged by European explorers, colonial officials and Christian missionaries. Nowhere was this more evident than in early descriptions of indigenous religions as savage, primitive, superstitious and fetishistic. Liberal intellectuals, both indigenous and colonial, reacted to this by claiming that, before indigenous peoples ever encountered Europeans, they all believed in a Supreme Being. The Invention of God in Indigenous Societies argues that, by alleging that God can be located at the core of pre-Christian cultures, this claim effectively invents a tradition which only makes sense theologically if God has never left himself without a witness. Examining a range of indigenous religions from North America, Africa and Australasia - the Shona of Zimbabwe, the "Rainbow Spirit Theology" in Australia, the Yupiit of Alaska, and the Māori of New Zealand – the book argues that the interests of indigenous societies are best served by carefully describing their religious beliefs and practices using historical and phenomenological methods – just as would be done in the study of any world religion.