The Invention of Scotland

Author: Hugh Trevor-Roper

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300176538

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4407

The Invention of Scotland (Routledge Revivals)

The Stuart Myth and the Scottish Identity, 1638 to the Present

Author: Murray G. H. Pittock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317605268

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 6963

A dynasty of high ability and great charm, the Stuarts exerted a compelling fascination over their supporters and enemies alike. First published in 1991, this title assesses the influence of the Stuart mystique on the modern political and cultural identity of Scotland. Murray Pittock traces the Stuart myth from the days of Charles I to the modern Scottish National Party, and discusses both pro- and anti-Union propaganda. He provides a unique insight into the ‘radicalism’ of Scottish Jacobitism, contrasting this ‘Jacobitisim of the Left’ with the sentimental image constructed by the Victorians. Dealing with a subject of great relevance to modern British society, this reissue provides an extensive analysis of Scottish nationhood, the Stuart cult and Jacobite ideology. It will be of great interest to students of literature, history, and Scottish culture and politics.

The Invention of Tradition

Author: Eric Hobsbawm,Terence O. Ranger

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521437738

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 9630

This book explores examples of this process of invention and addresses the complex interaction of past and present in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism.

The Scottish Invention of English Literature

Author: Robert Crawford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521590389

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 259

View: 909

The Scottish Invention of English Literature explores the origins of the teaching of English literature in the academy. It demonstrates how the subject began in eighteenth-century Scottish universities before being exported to America and other countries. The emergence of English as an institutionalised university subject was linked to the search for distinctive cultural identities throughout the English-speaking world. This book explores the role the discipline played in administering restraints on the expression of indigenous literary forms, and shows how the growing professionalisation of English as a subject offered a breeding ground for academics and writers with an interest in native identity and cultural nationalism. This book is a comprehensive account of the historical origins of the university subject of English literature and provides a wealth of new material on its particular Scottish provenance.

Governing Scotland

The Invention of Administrative Devolution

Author: James Mitchell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230800041

Category: Political Science

Page: 259

View: 3480

Governing Scotland explores the origins and development of the Scottish Office in an attempt to understand Scotland's position within the UK union state in the twentieth century. Two competing views were encapsulated in debates on how Scotland should be governed in the early twentieth century: a Whitehall view that emphasised a professional bureaucracy with power centred on London and a Scottish view that emphasised the importance of Scottish national sentiment. These views were ultimately reconciled in 'administrative devolution'.

The Invention of Tradition

Author: Eric Hobsbawm,Terence Ranger

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107604672

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 2546

Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparatively recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh and Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial rituals in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. It addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historians and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which poses new questions for the understanding of our history.

The Invention of Discovery, 1500–1700

Author: Dr James Dougal Fleming

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409478688

Category: Science

Page: 228

View: 8016

The early modern period used to be known as the Age of Discovery. More recently, it has been troped as an age of invention. But was the invention/discovery binary itself invented, or discovered? This volume investigates the possibility that it was invented, through a range of early modern knowledge practices, centered on the emergence of modern natural science. From Bacon to Galileo, from stagecraft to math, from martyrology to romance, contributors to this interdisciplinary collection examine the period's generation of discovery as an absolute and ostensibly neutral standard of knowledge-production. They further investigate the hermeneutic implications for the epistemological authority that tends, in modernity, still to be based on that standard. The Invention of Discovery, 1500–1700 is a set of attempts to think back behind discovery, considered as a decisive trope for modern knowledge.

Religious Identity and the Invention of Tradition

Papers Read at a NOSTER Conference in Soesterberg, January 4-6, 1999

Author: J. W. van Henten,Anton W. J. Houtepen,Nederlandse Onderzoekschool voor Theologie en Religiewetenschap

Publisher: Uitgeverij Van Gorcum

ISBN: 9789023237143

Category: Religion

Page: 367

View: 5123

"The present book contains the contributions to the first conference of the Netherlands School for Advanced Studies and Religion (NOSTER) ... The conference theme was inspired by Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger's influential volume, The Invention of Tradition."--Introd., p. [3].

The Invention of Middle English

An Anthology of Primary Sources

Author: David Matthews

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271020822

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 1241

At a time when medieval studies is increasingly concerned with historicizing and theorizing its own origins and history, the development of the study of Middle English has been relatively neglected. The Invention of Middle English collects for the first time the principal sources through which this history can be traced. The documents presented here highlight the uncertain and haphazard way in which ideas about Middle English language and literature were shaped by antiquarians in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It is a valuable sourcebook for medieval studies, for study of the reception of the Middle Ages, and, more generally, for the history of the rise of English. The anthology is divided into two sections. The first section traces the development of ideas about the Middle English language in the work of thirteen writers, including George Hickes, Thomas Warton, Jacob Grimm, Henry Sweet, and James Murray. The second section represents literary criticism and commentary by nineteen authors, including Warton, Thomas Percy, Joseph Ritson, Walter Scott, Thomas Wright, and Walter Skeat. Each of the extracts is annotated and introduced with a note presenting historical, biographical, and bibliographical information along with a guide to further reading. A general introduction provides an overview of the state of Middle English study and a brief history of the formation of the discipline.

The Invention of 'Folk Music' and 'Art Music'

Emerging Categories from Ossian to Wagner

Author: Matthew Gelbart

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139466089

Category: Music

Page: N.A

View: 5023

We tend to take for granted the labels we put to different forms of music. This study considers the origins and implications of the way in which we categorize music. Whereas earlier ways of classifying music were based on its different functions, for the past two hundred years we have been obsessed with creativity and musical origins, and classify music along these lines. Matthew Gelbart argues that folk music and art music became meaningful concepts only in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and only in relation to each other. He examines how cultural nationalism served as the earliest impetus in classifying music by origins, and how the notions of folk music and art music followed - in conjunction with changing conceptions of nature, and changing ideas about human creativity. Through tracing the history of these musical categories, the book confronts our assumptions about different kinds of music.

Scots and Britons

Scottish Political Thought and the Union of 1603

Author: Roger A. Mason

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521026208

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 9796

This collection of essays by distinguished scholars from Britain and North America makes a major contribution to the remapping of early modern British political thought. Focusing on the union of the Anglo-Scottish crowns in 1603, it examines the background to and consequences of the creation of a British monarchy from a distinctively Scottish viewpoint, and sheds new light on the collapse of multiple kingship in the mid-seventeenth century and the Scots' participation in the invention of Britain.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History

Author: T. M. Devine,Jenny Wormald

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191624330

Category: History

Page: 720

View: 1973

Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.

The Invention of Autonomy

A History of Modern Moral Philosophy

Author: Jerome B. Schneewind

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521479387

Category: Philosophy

Page: 624

View: 9240

Study of the history of moral philosophy which puts Kant's ethics into historical context.

John Gregory and the Invention of Professional Medical Ethics and the Profession of Medicine

Author: Laurence B. McCullough

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0585271623

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 8535

The best things in my Ufe have come to me by accident and this book results from one such accident: my having the opportunity, out of the blue, to go to work as H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. 's, research assistant at the Institute for the Medical Humanities in the University of Texas Medi cal Branch at Galveston, Texas, in 1974, on the recommendation of our teacher at the University of Texas at Austin, Irwin C. Lieb. During that summer Tris "lent" me to Chester Bums, who has done important schol arly work over the years on the history of medical ethics. I was just finding out what bioethics was and Chester sent me to the rare book room of the Medical Branch Library to do some work on something called "medical deontology. " I discovered that this new field of bioethics had a history. This string of accidents continued, in 1975, when Warren Reich (who in 1979 made the excellent decisions to hire me to the faculty in bioethics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine and to persuade Andre Hellegers to appoint me to the Kennedy Institute of Ethics) took Tris Engelhardt's word for it that I could write on the history of modem medical ethics for Warren's major new project, the Encyclopedia of Bioethics. Warren then asked me to write on eighteenth-century British medical ethics.

The Renaissance in Scotland

Studies in Literature, Religion, History, and Culture Offered to John Durkhan

Author: A. Alasdair A. MacDonald,Michael Lynch,Ian Borthwick Cowan

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004100978

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 2371

"The Renaissance in Scotland" contains original essays on the following topics of cultural history: literature; manuscripts and printed books; libraries; law; universities; music; education; social, political and ecclesiastical history. It offers fresh interpretations of many aspects of the age of humanism and reform, as this impinged on Scotland.

From Tartan to Tartanry: Scottish Culture, History and Myth

Scottish Culture, History and Myth

Author: Ian Brown

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748644490

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4864

An historically and critically sound - and contemporary - evaluation of tartan and tartanry based on proper contextualisation and coherent analysis. This critical re-evaluation of one of the more controversial aspects of recent debates on Scottish culture draws together contributions from leading researchers in a wide variety of disciplines, resulting in a highly accessible yet authoritative volume. This book, like tartan, weaves together two strands. The first, like a warp, considers the significance of tartan in Scottish history and culture during the last four centuries, including tartan's role in the development of diaspora identities in North America. The second, like a weft, considers the place of tartan and rise of tartanry in the national and international representations of Scottishness, including heritage, historical myth-making, popular culture, music hall, literature, film, comedy, rock and pop music, sport and 'high' culture. From Tartan to Tartanry offers fresh insight into and new perspectives on key cultural phenomena, from the iconic role of the Scottish regiments to the role of tartan in rock music. It argues that tartan may be fun, but it also plays a wide range of fascinating, important and valuable roles in Scottish and international culture.

The Invention of the Newspaper

English Newsbooks, 1641-1649

Author: Joad Raymond

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199282340

Category: History

Page: 379

View: 6936

First published in 1996, and here issued with a new preface, this work describes the emergence of the first weekly news publications, the immediate precursors of the modern newspaper. Previous ed.: Oxford: Clarendon, 1996.