The Emotions of Justice

Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson Korea

Author: Jisoo M. Kim

Publisher: Korean Studies of the Henry M.

ISBN: 9780295742694

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 450

The Choson state (1392-1910) is typically portrayed as a rigid society because of its hereditary status system, slavery, and Confucian gender norms. However, The Emotions of Justice reveals a surprisingly complex picture of a judicial system that operated in a contradictory fashion by discriminating against subjects while simultaneously minimizing such discrimination. Jisoo Kim contends that the state's recognition of won, or the sense of being wronged, permitted subjects of different genders or statuses to interact in the legal realm and in doing so illuminates the intersection of law, emotions, and gender in premodern Korea.

Between Dreams and Reality

The Military Examination in Late Chosŏn Korea, 1600-1894

Author: Eugene Y. Park

Publisher: Harvard Univ Council on East Asian

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 634

From the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century, millions of Korean men from all walks of life trained in the arts of war to prepare not for actual combat but to sit for the state military examination (mukwa). Despite this widespread interest, only for a small minority did passing the test lead to appointment as a military official. Why, then, did so many men aspire to the mukwa? Eugene Y. Park argues that the mukwa was not only the state's primary instrument for recruiting aristocrats as new members to the military bureaucracy but also a means by which the ruling elite of Seoul could partially satisfy the status aspirations of marginalized regional elites, secondary status groups, commoners, and manumitted slaves. Unlike the civil examination (munkwa), however, that assured successful examinees posts in the prestigious central bureaucracy, achievement in the mukwa did not enable them to gain political power or membership in the existing aristocracy. A wealth of empirical data and primary sources drives Park's study: a database of more than 32,000 military examination graduates; a range of new and underutilized documents such as court records, household registers, local gazetteers, private memoirs, examination rosters, and genealogies; and products of popular culture, such as p'ansori storytelling and vernacular fiction. Drawing on this extensive evidence, Park provides a comprehensive sociopolitical history of the mukwa system in late Choson Korea.

Ginseng and Borderland

Territorial Boundaries and Political Relations Between Qing China and Choson Korea, 1636-1912

Author: Seonmin Kim

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520295994

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 8823

At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Ginseng and Borderland explores the territorial boundaries and political relations between Qing China and Choson Korea during the period from the early seventeenth to the late nineteenth centuries. By examining a unique body of materials written in Chinese, Manchu, and Korean, and building on recent studies in New Qing History, Seonmin Kim adds new perspectives to current understandings of the remarkable transformation of the Manchu Qing dynasty (1636–1912) from a tribal state to a universal empire. This book discusses early Manchu history and explores the Qing Empire’s policy of controlling Manchuria and Choson Korea. Kim also contributes to theKorean history of the Choson dynasty (1392–1910) by challenging conventional accounts that embrace a China-centered interpretation of the tributary relationship between the two polities, stressing instead the agency of Choson Korea in the formation of the Qing Empire. This study demonstrates how Koreans interpreted and employed this relationship in order to preserve the boundary—and peace—with the suzerain power. By focusing on the historical significance of the China-Korea boundary, this book defines the nature of the Qing Empire through the dynamics of contacts and conflicts under both the cultural and material frameworks of its tributary relationship with Choson Korea.

Rationalizing Korea

The Rise of the Modern State, 1894–1945

Author: Kyung Moon Hwang

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520288319

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 2316

The first book to explore the institutional, ideological, and conceptual development of the modern state on the peninsula, Rationalizing Korea analyzes the state’s relationship to five social sectors, each through a distinctive interpretive theme: economy (developmentalism), religion (secularization), education (public schooling), population (registration), and public health (disease control). Kyung Moon Hwang argues that while this formative process resulted in a more commanding and systematic state, it was also highly fragmented, socially embedded, and driven by competing, often conflicting rationalizations, including those of Confucian statecraft and legitimation. Such outcomes reflected the acute experience of imperialism, nationalism, colonialism, and other sweeping forces of the era.

Figuring Korean Futures

Children's Literature in Modern Korea

Author: Dafna Zur

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781503601680

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3943

Heroes and Toilers

Work as Life in Postwar North Korea, 1953–1961

Author: Cheehyung Harrison Kim

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231546092

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7351

In search of national unity and state control in the decade following the Korean War, North Korea turned to labor. Mandating rapid industrial growth, the government stressed order and consistency in everyday life at both work and home. In Heroes and Toilers, Cheehyung Harrison Kim offers an unprecedented account of life and labor in postwar North Korea that brings together the roles of governance and resistance. Kim traces the state’s pursuit of progress through industrialism and examines how ordinary people challenged it every step of the way. Even more than coercion or violence, he argues, work was crucial to state control. Industrial labor was both mode of production and mode of governance, characterized by repetitive work, mass mobilization, labor heroes, and the insistence on convergence between living and working. At the same time, workers challenged and reconfigured state power to accommodate their circumstances—coming late to work, switching jobs, fighting with bosses, and profiting from the black market, as well as following approved paths to secure their livelihood, resolve conflict, and find happiness. Heroes and Toilers is a groundbreaking analysis of postwar North Korea that avoids the pitfalls of exoticism and exceptionalism to offer a new answer to the fundamental question of North Korea’s historical development.

Anarchism in Korea

Independence, Transnationalism, and the Question of National Development, 1919-1984

Author: Dongyoun Hwang

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438461690

Category: Political Science

Page: 306

View: 3898

A regional and transnational history of anarchism in Korea. This book provides a history of anarchism in Korea and challenges conventional views of Korean anarchism as merely part of nationalist ideology, situating the study within a wider East Asian regional context. Dongyoun Hwang demonstrates that although the anarchist movement in Korea began as part of its struggle for independence from Japan, connections with anarchists and ideas from China and Japan gave the movement a regional and transnational dimension that transcended its initial nationalistic scope. Following the movement after 1945, Hwang shows how anarchism in Korea was deradicalized and evolved into an idea for both social revolution and alternative national development, with emphasis on organizing and educating peasants and developing rural villages. “In contrast to dominant Korean-language scholarship, this book has a dialectical understanding of the relationship between anarchism and nationalism, one that understands the importance of nationalism for revolution in the colonial context, but one that also shows convincingly that as anarchism in Korea grew and deepened, it acquired significantly transnational dimensions.” — Christopher Connery, author of The Empire of the Text: Writing and Authority in Early Imperial China

Placing Empire

Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan

Author: Kate McDonald

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293916

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 717

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Placing Empire examines the spatial politics of Japanese imperialism through a study of Japanese travel and tourism to Korea, Manchuria, and Taiwan between the late nineteenth century and the early 1950s. In a departure from standard histories of Japan, this book shows how debates over the role of colonized lands reshaped the social and spatial imaginary of the modern Japanese nation and how, in turn, this sociospatial imaginary affected the ways in which colonial difference was conceptualized and enacted. The book thus illuminates how ideas of place became central to the production of new forms of colonial hierarchy as empires around the globe transitioned from an era of territorial acquisition to one of territorial maintenance.

The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation

Author: JaHyun Kim Haboush

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780231172288

Category: East Asia

Page: 240

View: 509

"JaHyun Kim Haboush argues that beginning with the outbreak of the Imjin War, when Japan invaded Korea in 1592, a discourse of nation emerged in Chosaon Korea (1392-1910) which continued, in a variety of forms, until the modern era. This is the first book to examine the formation of the Korean nation before the modern era. The Imjin War and the rise of the Manchu were events of monumental importance in East Asian history. The Great East Asian War escalated into a six-year regional war in which the three East Asian countries, Japan, Korea and China, fought either as allies or enemies, with a commitment of large forces, fighting on sea and land. This conflict was by far the largest war known to the world in the sixteenth century. In East Asian memory, it remained unequalled in scale until the Second World War. In Korea the Chosaon dynasty began in 1392 and persisted until 1910, and within this dynasty an idea of nation emerged and circulated. This discourse of nation shifted and intensified after the Manchu invasion in 1636. Haboush shows how this process was a visible, traceable, and documented phenomenon. The idea of a sixteenth century Korean nation is also unfamiliar in Korea. Nationalism for the most part is presented as a preexisting condition in the Imjin War, though 'strengthened' and 'heightened' by the experience. Scholars of the modernist camp subscribe to the historicism of Western historiography. They present the nationhood of Korea as a narrative of transformation, locating its arrival in the modern period, sometime in late 19th or early 20th century, under the auspices of new ideologies and visions from the West"--Privided by publisher.

Competing Discourses

Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction

Author: Maram Epstein

Publisher: Harvard Univ Asia Center

ISBN: 9780674005129

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 353

View: 9624

In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming-Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives: Marriage Bonds to Awaken the World, Dream of the Red Chamber, A Country Codger's Words of Exposure, Flowers in the Mirror, and A Tale of Heroic Lovers. Epstein argues that the authors of these novels manipulated gendered terms to achieve structural coherence. These patterns are, however, frequently at odds with other gendered structures in the texts, and authors exploited these conflicts to discuss the problem of orthodox behavior versus the cult of feeling.

Citizenship and Migration in the Era of Globalization

The Flow of Migrants and the Perception of Citizenship in Asia and Europe

Author: Markus Pohlmann,Jonghoe Yang,Jong-Hee Lee

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642197396

Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 1443

In an age of globalization there is frequent migration across national borders, resulting in a reconsideration of the notion, practice and social institution of national citizenship. Addressing this phenomenon, the book focuses on the exchange between, and responses, of Korea and Germany. In particular, the book deals extensively with citizenship in Korea where the concept of citizenship is young, and thus the study of citizenship is relatively scarce. This book may be the first of its kind, bringing together eminent Korean and German scholars to analyse various aspects of citizenship in Korea. It is hoped that it will contribute to scholarship in the fields of citizenship and migration and to an understanding of the flow of people and ideas between Asia and Europe.

Treasures in Trusted Hands

Negotiating the Future of Colonial Cultural Objects

Author: Jos van Beurden

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9789088904400

Category:

Page: 230

View: 1482

This pioneering study charts the one-way traffic of cultural and historical objects during five centuries of European colonialism. It presents abundant examples of disappeared colonial objects and systematizes these into war booty, confiscations by missionaries and contestable acquisitions by private persons and other categories. Former colonies consider this as a historical injustice that has not been undone. Former colonial powers have kept most of the objects in their custody. In the 1970s the Netherlands and Belgium returned objects to their former colonies Indonesia and DR Congo; but their number was considerably smaller than what had been asked for. Nigeria's requests for the return of some Benin objects, confiscated by British soldiers in 1897, are rejected. As there is no consensus on how to deal with colonial objects, disputes about other categories of contestable objects are analyzed. For Nazi-looted artworks the 1998 Washington Conference Principles have been widely accepted. Although non-binding, they promote fair and just solutions and help people to reclaim art works that they lost involuntarily. To promote solutions for colonial objects, nine Principles for Dealing with Colonial Cultural and Historical Objects are presented, based on the Washington Conference Principles. The nine are part of a model to facilitate mediation in disputes about them. This model can help to break the impasse in negotiations between former colonizers and colonies. Europe, the former colonizers, should do more pro-active provenance research into the acquisitions from the colonial era, both in public institutions and private collections. "This is a very commendable treatise which has painstakingly and with detachment explored the emotive issue of the return of cultural objects removed in colonial times to the metropolis. He has looked at the issues from every continent with clarity and perspicuity." Prof. Folarin Shyllon (University of Ibadan) "Momumentaal werk van hoge kwaliteit. Het hoofdstuk over Congo is bijzonder goed gedocumenteerd en leerrijk" Dr. Guido Gryseels (Director-General of the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren) CLUES is an international scientific series covering research in the field of culture, history and heritage which have been written by, or were performed under the supervision of members of the research institute CLUE+.

Snow Falling on Cedars

Author: David Guterson

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408806762

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 7566

He saw the soft cedars of San Piedro Island, its high, rolling hills, the low mist that lay in long streamers against its beaches, the whitecaps riffling its shoreline. The moon had risen already behind the island – a quarter moon, pale and indefinite, as ethereal and translucent as the wisps of cloud that travelled the skies. A fisherman is found dead in the net of his boat off the coast of a North American island. When a local Japanese-American man is charged with his murder, it becomes clear that what is at stake is more than one man's guilt. For on San Piedro, memories grow as thickly as cedar trees – memories of a charmed romance between a white boy and a Japanese girl. Above all, the island is haunted by what happened to its Japanese residents during the Second World War, when an entire community was sent into exile while its neighbours watched.

Protestantism and Politics in Korea

Author: Chung-shin Park

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295802081

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3012

Following its introduction to Korea in the late nineteenth century, Protestantism grew rapidly both in numbers of followers and in influence, and remained a dominating social and political force throughout the twentieth century. In Protestantism and Politics in Korea, Chung-shin Park charts this stunning growth and examines the shifting political associations of Korean Protestantism. Elsewhere in Asia, evangelical Protestant missionaries failed to have much social and political impact, being perceived as little more than agents of Western imperialism. But in Korea the church became a locus of national resistance to Japanese colonization in the fifty years preceding 1945. Missionaries and local adherents steadily gained popular support as they became identified with progressive political reforms. After World War II and the division of the Korean peninsula, however, most Protestant institutions in South Korea were conscripted into the fight against communism. In addition, they became involved in the postwar push for rapid economic development. These alliances led to increasing political conservatism, so that mainstream Korean Protestantism eventually became a stalwart defender of the authoritarian status quo. A small liberal minority remained politically active, supporting social and human rights causes throughout the 1960s and 1970s, laying the foundation for mass protests and gradual democratic liberalization in the 1980s. Park documents the theological evolution of Korean Protestantism from early fundamentalism to more liberal doctrines and shows how this evolution was reflected in the political landscape.

Confucianism and Modernization in East Asia

Critical Reflections

Author: Kim Kyong-Dong

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9811036268

Category: Philosophy

Page: 267

View: 1974

Spanning the 19th and 20th centuries and identifying multiple waves of modernization, this book illustrates how principles originating in Chinese Confucianism have impacted the modernization of East Asia, especially in Korea. It also analyzes how such principles are exercised at personal, interpersonal and organizational levels. As modernization unfolds in East Asia, there is a rising interest in tradition of Confucianism and reconsider the relevance of Confucianism to global development. This book considers the actual historical significance of Confucianism in the modernization of the three nations in this region, China, Korea, and Japan through the nineteenth century and early twentieth century to the aftermath of the end of World War II. Examining the existing literature dealing with how Confucianism has been viewed in connection with modernization, it provides insight into western attitudes towards Confucianism and the changes in perceptions relative to Asia in the very process of modernization itself. /div

Peasant Protest & Social Change in Colonial Korea

Author: Gi-Wook Shin

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295975481

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 9008

The period from 1876 to 1946 in Korea marked a turbulent time when the country opened its market to foreign powers, became subject to Japanese colonialism, and was swept into agricultural commercialization, industrialization, and eventually postcolonial revolutionary movements. Gi-Wook Shin examines how peasants responded to these events, and to their own economic and political circumstances, with protests that eventually shaped the course of postwar revolution in the north and reform in the south.

Assimilating Seoul

Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945

Author: Todd A. Henry

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293150

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9653

Assimilating Seoul, the first book-length study written in English about Seoul during the colonial period, challenges conventional nationalist paradigms by revealing the intersection of Korean and Japanese history in this important capital. Through microhistories of Shinto festivals, industrial expositions, and sanitation campaigns, Todd A. Henry offers a transnational account that treats the city’s public spaces as "contact zones," showing how residents negotiated pressures to become loyal, industrious, and hygienic subjects of the Japanese empire. Unlike previous, top-down analyses, this ethnographic history investigates modalities of Japanese rule as experienced from below. Although the colonial state set ambitious goals for the integration of Koreans, Japanese settler elites and lower-class expatriates shaped the speed and direction of assimilation by bending government initiatives to their own interests and identities. Meanwhile, Korean men and women of different classes and generations rearticulated the terms and degree of their incorporation into a multiethnic polity. Assimilating Seoul captures these fascinating responses to an empire that used the lure of empowerment to disguise the reality of alienation.

Counterculture Colophon

Grove Press, the Evergreen Review, and the Incorporation of the Avant-Garde

Author: Loren Glass

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804784160

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 7926

Responsible for such landmark publications as Lady Chatterley's Lover, Tropic of Cancer, Naked Lunch, Waiting for Godot,The Wretched of the Earth , and The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Grove Press was the most innovative publisher of the postwar era. Counterculture Colophon tells the story of how the press and its house journal, The Evergreen Review, revolutionized the publishing industry and radicalized the reading habits of the "paperback generation." In the process, it offers a new window onto the 1960s, from 1951, when Barney Rosset purchased the fledgling press for $3,000, to 1970, when the multimedia corporation into which he had built the company was crippled by a strike and feminist takeover. Grove Press was not only responsible for ending censorship of the printed word in the United States but also for bringing avant-garde literature, especially drama, into the cultural mainstream as part of the quality paperback revolution. Much of this happened thanks to Rosset, whose charismatic leadership was crucial to Grove's success. With chapters covering world literature and the Latin American boom, including Grove's close association with UNESCO and the rise of cultural diplomacy; experimental drama such as the theater of the absurd, the Living Theater, and the political epics of Bertolt Brecht; pornography and obscenity, including the landmark publication of the complete work of the Marquis de Sade; revolutionary writing, featuring Rosset's daring pursuit of the Bolivian journals of Che Guevara; and underground film, including the innovative development of the pocket filmscript, Loren Glass covers the full spectrum of Grove's remarkable achievement as a communications center of the counterculture.

Marginality and Subversion in Korea

The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812

Author: Sun Joo Kim

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 029580338X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 836

In the history of Korea, the nineteenth century is often considered an age of popular rebellions. Scholarly approaches have typically pointed to these rebellions as evidence of the progressive direction of the period, often using the theory of class struggle as an analytical framework. In Marginality and Subversion in Korea, Sun Joo Kim argues that a close reading of the actors and circumstances involved in one of the century's major rebellions, the Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812, leads instead to more complex conclusions. Drawing from primary sources in Korean, Japanese, and classical Chinese, this book is the most extensive study in the English language of any of the major nineteenth-century rebellions in Korea. Whereas previous research has focused on economic and landlord-tenant tensions, suggesting that class animosity was the dominant feature in the political behavior of peasants, Sun Joo Kim explores the role of embittered local elites in providing vital support in the early stages to spur social change that would benefit these elites as much as the peasant class. Later, however, many of these same elites would rally to the side of the state, providing military and material contributions to help put down the rebellion. Kim explains why these opportunistic elites became discontented with the state in the scramble for power, prestige, and scarce resources, and why many ultimately worked to rescue and reinforce the Choson dynasty and the Confucian ideology that would prevail for another one hundred years. This sophisticated, groundbreaking study will be essential reading for historians and scholars of Korean studies, as well as those interested in early modern East Asia, social transformation, rebellions, and revolutions.

The Wiley International Handbook of Clinical Supervision

Author: C. Edward Watkins, Jr.,Derek L. Milne

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781119943327

Category: Psychology

Page: 740

View: 5292

This is the first handbook to examine the theory, research, and practice of clinical supervision from an international, multi-disciplinary perspective. Focuses on conceptual and research foundations, practice foundations, core skills, measuring competence, and supervision perspectives Includes original articles by contributors from around the world, including Australia, Finland, Hong Kong, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States Addresses key aspects of supervision, including competency frameworks, evidence-based practice, supervisory alliances, qualitative and quantitative assessment, diversity-sensitive supervision, and more Features timely and authoritative coverage of the latest research in the field and novel ideas for clinical practice