The Emotions of Justice

Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson Korea

Author: Jisoo M. Kim

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295806176

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 1240

The Choson state (1392�1910) is typically portrayed as a rigid society because of its hereditary status system, slavery, and Confucian gender norms. However, The Emotions of Justice reveals a surprisingly complex picture of a judicial system that operated in a contradictory fashion by discriminating against subjects while simultaneously minimizing such discrimination. Jisoo Kim contends that the state�s recognition of won, or the sense of being wronged, permitted subjects of different genders or statuses to interact in the legal realm and in doing so illuminates the intersection of law, emotions, and gender in premodern Korea.

Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets

The Culture of Objects in Late Chos n Korean Art

Author: Sunglim Kim

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295743425

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 2036

The social and economic rise of the chungin class (�middle people� who ranked between the yangban aristocracy and commoners) during the late Chos n period (1700�1910) ushered in a world of materialism and commodification of painting and other art objects. Generally overlooked in art history, the chungin contributed to a flourishing art market, especially for ch�aekk ri, a new form of still life painting that experimented with Western perspective and illusionism, and a reimagined style of the traditional plum blossom painting genre. Sunglim Kim examines chungin artists and patronage of the visual arts, and their commercial transactions, artistic exchange with China and Japan, and historical writings on art. She also explores the key role of men of chungin background in preserving Korean art heritage in the tumultuous twentieth century, including the work of the modern Korean collector and historian O Se-ch�ang, who memorialized many chungin painters and calligraphers. Revealing a vivid picture of a complex art world, Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets presents a major reconsideration of late Chos n society and its material culture. Lushly illustrated, it will appeal to scholars of Korea and East Asia, art history, visual culture, and social history.

Wrongful Deaths

Selected Inquest Records from Nineteenth-Century Korea

Author: N.A

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804963

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 9681

This collection presents and analyzes inquest records that tell the stories of ordinary Korean people under the Choson court (1392-1910). Extending the study of this period, usually limited to elites, into the realm of everyday life, each inquest record includes a detailed postmortem examination and features testimony from everyone directly or indirectly related to the incident. The result is an amazingly vivid, colloquial account of the vibrant, multifaceted sociocultural and legal culture of early modern Korea.

Women and Confucianism in Choson Korea

New Perspectives

Author: Youngmin Kim,Michael J. Pettid

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438437773

Category: RELIGION

Page: 178

View: 9002

A new, multifaceted look at Korean women during a period of strong Confucian ideology. This volume offers a fresh, multifaceted exploration of women and Confucianism in mid- to late-Choson Korea (mid-sixteenth to early twentieth century). Using primary sources and perspectives from social history, intellectual history, literature, and political thought, contributors challenge unitary views of Confucianism as a system of thought, of women as a group, and of the relationship between the two. Much earlier scholarship has focused on how women were oppressed under the strict patriarchal systems that emerged as Confucianism became the dominant social ideology during the Choson dynasty (1392–1910). Contributors to this volume bring to light the varied ways that diverse women actually lived during this era, from elite yangban women to women who were enslaved. Women are shown to have used various strategies to seek status, economic rights, and more comfortable spaces, with some women even emerging as Confucian intellectuals and exemplars.

Buddhas and Ancestors

Religion and Wealth in Fourteenth-Century Korea

Author: Juhn Y. Ahn

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295743409

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 9834

Two issues central to the transition from the Kory to the Chos n dynasty in fourteenth-century Korea were social differences in ruling elites and the decline of Buddhism, which had been the state religion. In this revisionist history, Juhn Ahn challenges the long-accepted Confucian critique that Buddhism had become so powerful and corrupt that the state had to suppress it. When newly rising elites (many with strong ties to the Mongols) used lavish donations to Buddhist institutions to enhance their status, older elites defended their own adherence to this time-honored system by arguing that their donations were linked to virtue. This emphasis on virtue and the consequent separation of religion from wealth facilitated the Confucianization of Korea and the relegation of Buddhism to the margins of public authority during the Chos n dynasty.

Between Dreams and Reality

The Military Examination in Late Chosŏn Korea, 1600-1894

Author: Eugene Y. Park

Publisher: Harvard Univ Council on East Asian

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 2587

From the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century, millions of Korean men from all walks of life trained in the arts of war to prepare not for actual combat but to sit for the state military examination (mukwa). Despite this widespread interest, only for a small minority did passing the test lead to appointment as a military official. Why, then, did so many men aspire to the mukwa? Eugene Y. Park argues that the mukwa was not only the state's primary instrument for recruiting aristocrats as new members to the military bureaucracy but also a means by which the ruling elite of Seoul could partially satisfy the status aspirations of marginalized regional elites, secondary status groups, commoners, and manumitted slaves. Unlike the civil examination (munkwa), however, that assured successful examinees posts in the prestigious central bureaucracy, achievement in the mukwa did not enable them to gain political power or membership in the existing aristocracy. A wealth of empirical data and primary sources drives Park's study: a database of more than 32,000 military examination graduates; a range of new and underutilized documents such as court records, household registers, local gazetteers, private memoirs, examination rosters, and genealogies; and products of popular culture, such as p'ansori storytelling and vernacular fiction. Drawing on this extensive evidence, Park provides a comprehensive sociopolitical history of the mukwa system in late Choson Korea.

Ginseng and Borderland

Territorial Boundaries and Political Relations Between Qing China and Choson Korea, 1636-1912

Author: Seonmin Kim

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520295994

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 3364

At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Ginseng and Borderland explores the territorial boundaries and political relations between Qing China and Choson Korea during the period from the early seventeenth to the late nineteenth centuries. By examining a unique body of materials written in Chinese, Manchu, and Korean, and building on recent studies in New Qing History, Seonmin Kim adds new perspectives to current understandings of the remarkable transformation of the Manchu Qing dynasty (1636–1912) from a tribal state to a universal empire. This book discusses early Manchu history and explores the Qing Empire’s policy of controlling Manchuria and Choson Korea. Kim also contributes to theKorean history of the Choson dynasty (1392–1910) by challenging conventional accounts that embrace a China-centered interpretation of the tributary relationship between the two polities, stressing instead the agency of Choson Korea in the formation of the Qing Empire. This study demonstrates how Koreans interpreted and employed this relationship in order to preserve the boundary—and peace—with the suzerain power. By focusing on the historical significance of the China-Korea boundary, this book defines the nature of the Qing Empire through the dynamics of contacts and conflicts under both the cultural and material frameworks of its tributary relationship with Choson Korea.

Figuring Korean Futures

Children’s Literature in Modern Korea

Author: Dafna Zur

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503603113

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 4049

This book is the story of the emergence and development of writing for children in modern Korea. Starting in the 1920s, a narrator-adult voice began to speak directly to a child-reader. This child audience was perceived as unique because of a new concept: the child-heart, the perception that the child's body and mind were transparent and knowable, and that they rested on the threshold of culture. This privileged location enabled writers and illustrators, educators and psychologists, intellectual elite and laypersons to envision the child as a powerful antidote to the present and as an uplifting metaphor of colonial Korea's future. Reading children's periodicals against the political, educational, and psychological discourses of their time, Dafna Zur argues that the figure of the child was particularly favorable to the project of modernity and nation-building, as well as to the colonial and postcolonial projects of socialization and nationalization. She demonstrates the ways in which Korean children's literature builds on a trajectory that begins with the child as an organic part of nature, and ends, in the post-colonial era, with the child as the primary agent of control of nature. Figuring Korean Futures reveals the complex ways in which the figure of the child became a driving force of nostalgia that stood in for future aspirations for the individual, family, class, and nation.

Anarchism in Korea

Independence, Transnationalism, and the Question of National Development, 1919-1984

Author: Dongyoun Hwang

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438461690

Category: Political Science

Page: 306

View: 8561

A regional and transnational history of anarchism in Korea. This book provides a history of anarchism in Korea and challenges conventional views of Korean anarchism as merely part of nationalist ideology, situating the study within a wider East Asian regional context. Dongyoun Hwang demonstrates that although the anarchist movement in Korea began as part of its struggle for independence from Japan, connections with anarchists and ideas from China and Japan gave the movement a regional and transnational dimension that transcended its initial nationalistic scope. Following the movement after 1945, Hwang shows how anarchism in Korea was deradicalized and evolved into an idea for both social revolution and alternative national development, with emphasis on organizing and educating peasants and developing rural villages. “In contrast to dominant Korean-language scholarship, this book has a dialectical understanding of the relationship between anarchism and nationalism, one that understands the importance of nationalism for revolution in the colonial context, but one that also shows convincingly that as anarchism in Korea grew and deepened, it acquired significantly transnational dimensions.” — Christopher Connery, author of The Empire of the Text: Writing and Authority in Early Imperial China

The Great East Asian War and the Birth of the Korean Nation

Author: JaHyun Kim Haboush

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231540981

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 3228

The Imjin War (1592–1598) was a grueling conflict that wreaked havoc on the towns and villages of the Korean Peninsula. The involvement of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean forces, not to mention the regional scope of the war, was the largest the world had seen, and the memory dominated East Asian memory until World War II. Despite massive regional realignments, Korea's Chosôn Dynasty endured, but within its polity a new, national discourse began to emerge. Meant to inspire civilians to rise up against the Japanese army, this potent rhetoric conjured a unified Korea and intensified after the Manchu invasions of 1627 and 1636. By documenting this phenomenon, JaHyun Kim Haboush offers a compelling counternarrative to Western historiography, which ties Korea's idea of nation to the imported ideologies of modern colonialism. She instead elevates the formative role of the conflicts that defined the second half of the Chosôn Dynasty, which had transfigured the geopolitics of East Asia and introduced a national narrative key to Korea's survival. Re-creating the cultural and political passions that bound Chosôn society together during this period, Haboush reclaims the root story of solidarity that helped Korea thrive well into the modern era.

It's Madness

The Politics of Mental Health in Colonial Korea

Author: Theodore Jun Yoo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520289307

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 6896

"It's Madness examines Korea's critical years under Japanese colonialism when mental health first became defined as a medical and social problem. As in most Asian countries, severe social ostracism, shame, and fear of jeopardizing marriage prospects drove most Korean families to conceal the mentally ill behind closed doors. This book explores the impact of Chinese traditional medicine and its holistic approach to treating mental disorders, the resilience of folk illnesses as explanations for inappropriate and dangerous behaviors, the emergence of clinical psychiatry as a discipline, and the competing models of care under the Japanese colonial authorities and Western missionary doctors. It also analyzes interpretations of culture-bound emotional states that Koreans have viewed as specific to their interpersonal relationships, social experiences, local contexts, and the new medical discourses that the Korean press adopted to reshape social understandings of mental illness. Drawing upon unpublished archival as well as printed sources, this is the first study to examine the ways in which "madness" has been understood, classified, and treated in traditional Korea and the role of science in pathologizing and redefining mental illness under Japanese colonial rule"--Provided by publisher.

Aesthetics and World Politics

Author: R. Bleiker

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230244378

Category: Social Science

Page: 271

View: 3912

This book presents one of the first systematic assessments of aesthetic insights into world politics. It examines the nature of aesthetic approaches and outlines how they differ from traditional analysis of politics. The book explores the potential and limits of aesthetics through a series of case studies on language and poetics.

Rationalizing Korea

The Rise of the Modern State, 1894–1945

Author: Kyung Moon Hwang

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520288319

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 1768

The first book to explore the institutional, ideological, and conceptual development of the modern state on the peninsula, Rationalizing Korea analyzes the state’s relationship to five social sectors, each through a distinctive interpretive theme: economy (developmentalism), religion (secularization), education (public schooling), population (registration), and public health (disease control). Kyung Moon Hwang argues that while this formative process resulted in a more commanding and systematic state, it was also highly fragmented, socially embedded, and driven by competing, often conflicting rationalizations, including those of Confucian statecraft and legitimation. Such outcomes reflected the acute experience of imperialism, nationalism, colonialism, and other sweeping forces of the era.

Placing Empire

Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan

Author: Kate McDonald

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520293916

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3329

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Placing Empire examines the spatial politics of Japanese imperialism through a study of Japanese travel and tourism to Korea, Manchuria, and Taiwan between the late nineteenth century and the early 1950s. In a departure from standard histories of Japan, this book shows how debates over the role of colonized lands reshaped the social and spatial imaginary of the modern Japanese nation and how, in turn, this sociospatial imaginary affected the ways in which colonial difference was conceptualized and enacted. The book thus illuminates how ideas of place became central to the production of new forms of colonial hierarchy as empires around the globe transitioned from an era of territorial acquisition to one of territorial maintenance.

Competing Discourses

Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction

Author: Maram Epstein

Publisher: Harvard Univ Asia Center

ISBN: 9780674005129

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 353

View: 4018

In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming-Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives: Marriage Bonds to Awaken the World, Dream of the Red Chamber, A Country Codger's Words of Exposure, Flowers in the Mirror, and A Tale of Heroic Lovers. Epstein argues that the authors of these novels manipulated gendered terms to achieve structural coherence. These patterns are, however, frequently at odds with other gendered structures in the texts, and authors exploited these conflicts to discuss the problem of orthodox behavior versus the cult of feeling.

The Wiley International Handbook of Clinical Supervision

Author: C. Edward Watkins, Jr.,Derek L. Milne

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118846346

Category: Psychology

Page: 744

View: 5571

This is the first handbook to examine the theory, research, and practice of clinical supervision from an international, multi-disciplinary perspective. Focuses on conceptual and research foundations, practice foundations, core skills, measuring competence, and supervision perspectives Includes original articles by contributors from around the world, including Australia, Finland, Hong Kong, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States Addresses key aspects of supervision, including competency frameworks, evidence-based practice, supervisory alliances, qualitative and quantitative assessment, diversity-sensitive supervision, and more Features timely and authoritative coverage of the latest research in the field and novel ideas for clinical practice

Spaces of Possibility

In, Between, and Beyond Korea and Japan

Author: Clark W. Sorensen,Andrea Gevurtz Arai

Publisher: Center for Korea Studies Publi

ISBN: 9780295998411

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 9905

"Arising from a 2012 conference, this volume engages with spaces in, between, and beyond the national borders of Japan and Korea--what Henri Lefebvre has called 'social spaces of possibility in which difference suddenly arises.' Some of these spaces involve the ambiguous longings and aesthetic refigurings of the past in the present, the new social possibilities that emerge out of the seemingly impossible new spaces of development, the opportunities of genre. Museums, colonial remains, new architectural spaces, graffiti, street theater, popular song, recent films, photographic topography, and translated literature all serve as keys for unlocking the ambiguous and contradictory--yet powerful--emotions of spaces, whether in Tokyo, Seoul, or New York. Rather than emphasizing individual countries, chapters focus on the relationship between Korea and Japan. This volume will appeal to readers interested in urban studies, Korean and Japanese studies, popular culture, anthropology, social history, and literature. Contributors are Janet Poole, Tom Looser, Chris Nelson, Robert Oppenheim, Heather Hindman, Kyoung-Lae Kang, John Whittier Treat, Franz Prichard, and Heekyoung Cho"--Provided by publisher.

Offspring of Empire

The Koch'ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism, 1876-1945

Author: Carter J. Eckert

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295805137

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5376

According to conventional interpretations, the Japanese annexation of Korea in 1910 destroyed a budding native capitalist economy on the peninsula and blocked the development of a Korean capitalist class until 1945. In this expansive and provocative study, now available in paperback, Carter J. Eckert challenges the standard view and argues that Japanese imperialism, while politically oppressive, was also the catalyst and cradle of modern Korean industrial development. Ancient ties to China were replaced by new ones to Japan - ties that have continued to shape the South Korean political economy down to the present day. Eckert explores a wide range of themes, including the roots of capitalist development in Korea, the origins of the modern business elite, the nature of Japanese colonial policy and the Japanese colonial state, the relationship between the colonial government and the Korean economic elite, and the nature of Korean collaboration. He conveys a clear sense of the human complexity, archival richness, and intellectual challenge of the historical period. His documentation is thorough; his arguments are compelling and often strikingly innovative.

Translation's Forgotten History

Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature

Author: Heekyoung Cho

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674660045

Category:

Page: 230

View: 1178

Translationâe(tm)s Forgotten History investigates the meanings and functions that translation generated for modern national literatures during their formative period and reconsiders literature as part of a dynamic translational process of negotiating foreign values. By examining the triadic literary and cultural relations among Russia, Japan, and colonial Korea and revealing a shared sensibility and literary experience in East Asia (which referred to Russia as a significant other in the formation of its own modern literatures), this book highlights translation as a radical and ineradicable partâe"not merely a catalyst or complementâe"of the formation of modern national literature. Translationâe(tm)s Forgotten History thus rethinks the way modern literature developed in Korea and East Asia. While national canons are founded on amnesia regarding their process of formation, framing literature from the beginning as a process rather than an entity allows a more complex and accurate understanding of national literature formation in East Asia and may also provide a model for world literature today.

International Handbook of Research in Arts Education

Author: Liora Bresler

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402030525

Category: Education

Page: 1629

View: 5008

Providing a distillation of knowledge in the various disciplines of arts education (dance, drama, music, literature and poetry and visual arts), this essential handbook synthesizes existing research literature, reflects on the past, and contributes to shaping the future of the respective and integrated disciplines of arts education. While research can at times seem distant from practice, the Handbook aims to maintain connection with the live practice of art and of education, capturing the vibrancy and best thinking in the field of theory and practice. The Handbook is organized into 13 sections, each focusing on a major area or issue in arts education research.