The Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals

Author: Edward Payson Evans

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1886363528

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8220

Can an Animal Commit a Crime? This pioneering work collects an amazing assemblage of court cases in which animals have been named as defendants--chickens, rats, field mice, bees, gnats, and (in 34 recorded instances) pigs, among others-- providing insight into such modern issues as animal rights, capital punishment, and social and criminal theory. Evans suggests an intriguing distinction between trials of specific animals or particular crimes, such as the "murder" of an infant by a pig, and trials for larger, catastrophic events, such as plagues and infestations. In the latter case, Evans suggests a parallel to witchcraft. Edward Payson Evans [1831-1917], a historian, linguist and associate of Ralph Waldo Emerson, taught at the University of Michigan before moving to Germany, where he became a specialist in Oriental languages and German literature. A prolific author, his other Animal-related books are Animal Symbolism in Art and Literature and Animal Symbolism in Ecclesiastical Architecture, both published in 1887. CONTENTS Introduction 1. Bugs and Beasts before the Law 2. Mediaeval and Modern Penology Appendix Bibliography Index"

The Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals

Author: Edward Payson Evans

Publisher: Nicholas Humphrey

ISBN: 9780571148936

Category: Law

Page: 336

View: 3215

Looks at the concept of lawlessness in medieval Europe, relates the stories of animals tried for criminal acts, and discusses the changing concept of justice

Animal Trials

Author: Edward Payson Evans

Publisher: Hesperus Press

ISBN: 9781843913825

Category: History

Page: 146

View: 1823

An edited version of the text Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals—omitting much of the legal analysis and concentrating on an extraordinary range of trials To try an animal in a court of law for "crimes" and then sentence it to imprisonment or death seems barbaric, but for hundreds of years until the mid-19th century this practice was commonplace in Europe, and became the subject of a book called Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals. They include: an eight-month trial of a flock of weevils, for damaging vines—although the insects were found guilty, the sentence is unknown because the foot of the relevant parchment was eaten by insects. A pig tried found guilty of strangling and killing a baby in its cradle—the sentence was death and the pig was hanged. A group of rats who were summoned to court for eating the local barley, but failed to turn up—their defense counsel successfully argued that they had probably not received the summons and should be let off. There were even trials of inanimate objects, such as a Russian bell put on trial for abetting insurrection. It was found guilty and exiled to Siberia.

Fear of the Animal Planet

The Hidden History of Animal Resistance

Author: Jason Hribal,Jeffery St. Clair

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN: 1849350752

Category: Nature

Page: 280

View: 9618

Animals hate captivity; they tell us all the time. We just aren't listening.

A View to a Death in the Morning

hunting and nature through history

Author: Matt CARTMILL,Matt Cartmill

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674029259

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 3765

The Welfare of Performing Animals

A Historical Perspective

Author: David A. H. Wilson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3662458349

Category: Science

Page: 278

View: 3632

This timely book describes and analyses a neglected area of the history of concern for animal welfare, discussing the ends and means of the capture, transport, housing and training of performing animals, as well as the role of pressure groups, politics, the press and vested interests. It examines primary source material of considerable interdisciplinary interest, and addresses the influence of scientific and veterinary opinion and the effectiveness of proposals for supervisory legislation, noting the current international status and characteristics of present-day practice within the commercial sector. Animal performance has a long history, and at the beginning of the twentieth century this aspect of popular entertainment became the subject not just of a major public controversy but also of prolonged British parliamentary attention to animal welfare. Following an assessment of the use of trained animals in the more distant historical past, the book charts the emergence of criticism and analyses the arguments and evidence used by the opponents and proponents in Britain from the early twentieth century to the present, noting comparable events in the United States and elsewhere.

An Essay on Crimes and Punishments

Author: Cesare marchese di Beccaria,Voltaire

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Capital punishment

Page: 239

View: 2462

DeathQuest

An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Capital Punishment in the United States

Author: Robert M. Bohm

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317377842

Category: Political Science

Page: 569

View: 3205

This fifth edition of the first true textbook on the death penalty engages the reader with a full account of the arguments and issues surrounding capital punishment. The book begins with the history of the death penalty from colonial to modern times, and then examines the moral and legal arguments for and against capital punishment. It also provides an overview of major Supreme Court decisions and describes the legal process behind the death penalty. In addressing these issues, the author reviews recent developments in death penalty law and procedure, including ramifications of newer case law, such as that regarding using lethal injection as a method of execution. The author’s motivation has been to understand what motivates the "deathquest" of the American people, leading a large percentage of the public to support the death penalty. The book educates readers so that whatever their death penalty positions are, they are informed opinions.

The Death of Punishment

Searching for Justice among the Worst of the Worst

Author: Robert Blecker

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137381337

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 2701

For twelve years Robert Blecker, a criminal law professor, wandered freely inside Lorton Central Prison, armed only with cigarettes and a tape recorder. The Death of Punishment tests legal philosophy against the reality and wisdom of street criminals and their guards. Some killers' poignant circumstances should lead us to mercy; others show clearly why they should die. After thousands of hours over twenty-five years inside maximum security prisons and on death rows in seven states, the history and philosophy professor exposes the perversity of justice: Inside prison, ironically, it's nobody's job to punish. Thus the worst criminals often live the best lives. The Death of Punishment challenges the reader to refine deeply held beliefs on life and death as punishment that flare up with every news story of a heinous crime. It argues that society must redesign life and death in prison to make the punishment more nearly fit the crime. It closes with the final irony: If we make prison the punishment it should be, we may well abolish the very death penalty justice now requires.

A Treatise on State and Federal Control of Persons and Property in the United States

Considered from Both a Civil and Criminal Standpoint

Author: Christopher Gustavus Tiedeman

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584772298

Category: Law

Page: 1274

View: 546

Tiedeman, Christopher G. A Treatise on State and Federal Control of Persons and Property in the United States Considered from both a Civil and Criminal Standpoint. St. Louis: The F.H. Thomas Law Book Co., 1900. Two volumes. Reprinted 2002 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-229-8. Cloth. $195. * A conservative jurist known for his important study A Treatise on the Limitations of Police Power in the United States Considered from Both a Civil and Criminal Standpoint, Tiedeman [1857-1903] completed this work at a time when the spirit of social and economic laissez-faire of the Gilded Age was giving way to demands for greater degrees of governmental regulation in response to the emergence of modern corporate capitalism and, especially, the rapid growth of Socialism, Communism, and Anarchism. For Tiedeman, the fundamental issue is the need to control these groups in the interests of public order while preserving their rights of self-determination as guaranteed by the Constitution. He was optimistic that popular faith in the Constitution is strong enough to maintain this delicate balance.

The Mind Made Flesh

Essays from the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution

Author: Nicholas Humphrey

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192802279

Category: Psychology

Page: 366

View: 1195

Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology. Here, in a series of riveting essays, he invites us to 'take another look' at a variety of the central and not-so-central issues: the evolution of consciousness, the nature of the self, multiple personality disorder, the placebo effect, cave art, religious miracles, medieval animal trials, the seductions of dictatorship, and much more.

Diary of a DA

The True Story of the Prosecutor Who Took on the Mob, Fought Corruption, and Won

Author: Herbert J. Stern

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1620876744

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 576

View: 1033

An “extremely well written” firsthand account of taking down corrupt government officials and organized crime in 1970s New Jersey (Publishers Weekly). In 1961, twenty-five-year-old Herbert J. Stern stood in his green army uniform in a New York County courtroom to be sworn in as an attorney. In the years that follow, the idealistic young Stern would sharpen his skills in the criminal courts of New York City and emerge as the lead trial attorney for the Justice Department, charged with breaking the back of organized crime in New Jersey. Stern’s highly charged account of his outright war against government officials and the Mafia takes us deep inside the mechanisms of law and order during a time when cities were burning in race riots; when racketeering and graft were so prevalent in the Garden State that its own senator called it a “stench in the nostrils and an offense to the vision of the world.” Before Stern and his dedicated colleagues on the “strike force” are finished, they will have successfully prosecuted the mayors of Jersey City, Atlantic City, and Newark for being on the take; a congressman for conspiracy, tax violations, and perjury; and blackened the eye of organized crime. “For any fan of the . . . Sopranos and Boardwalk Empire television shows.” —Tribune Observer “An honest examination of how the justice system really works. . . . A page-turner of a true crime story.” —The Star-Ledger “Stern is a fascinated observer, thoroughly honest in both his job and his writing about it. . . . It details the gritty realities of a prosecutor’s office that few people witness.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Animal Estate

The English and Other Creatures in the Victorian Age

Author: Harriet Ritvo

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037076

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 5238

Discusses Victorian attitudes towards animals in terms of evolution, class structure, and natural science, and considers breeding, veterinary medicine, pets, and zoos

Too Big to Jail

How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations

Author: Brandon L. Garrett

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674744616

Category: Law

Page: 379

View: 302

American courts routinely hand down harsh sentences to individuals, but a very different standard of justice applies to corporations. Too Big to Jail takes readers into a complex, compromised world of backroom deals, for an unprecedented look at what happens when criminal charges are brought against a major company in the United States.

Discipline & Punish

The Birth of the Prison

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819299

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 4966

In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.