The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521807968

Category: Art

Page: 407

View: 5603

The age of Augustus, commonly dated to 30 BC--AD 14, was a pivotal period in world history. A time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in shaping their direction. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus captures the dynamics and richness of this era by examining important aspects of political and social history, religion, literature, and art and architecture.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107494567

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 1063

The age of Augustus, commonly dated to 30 BC – AD 14, was a pivotal period in world history. A time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in shaping their direction. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus captures the dynamics and richness of this era by examining important aspects of political and social history, religion, literature, and art and architecture. The sixteen essays, written by distinguished specialists from the United States and Europe, explore the multi-faceted character of the period and the interconnections between social, religious, political, literary, and artistic developments. Introducing the reader to many of the central issues of the Age of Augustus, the essays also break new ground and will stimulate further research and discussion.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780521003933

Category: Art

Page: 407

View: 1217

The age of Augustus, commonly dated to 30 BC--AD 14, was a pivotal period in world history. A time of tremendous change in Rome, Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean world, many developments were underway when Augustus took charge and a recurring theme is the role that he played in shaping their direction. The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus captures the dynamics and richness of this era by examining important aspects of political and social history, religion, literature, and art and architecture.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Constantine

Author: Noel Lenski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107013402

Category: History

Page: 471

View: 6771

This Cambridge Companion gives a comprehensive introduction to the age of the emperor Constantine, a man whose strong personality is evident in the development of the Roman Empire during the period of his rule, and whose own personal development often ran alongside that of the empire. Divided into five sections dealing with political history, religion, social and economic history, art, and foreign relations, each chapter examines the intimate interplay between a powerful personality and his world. The second edition contains minor corrections, updated footnotes and a brief summary of new publications on the reign.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Pericles

Author: Loren J. Samons II

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826697

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9072

Mid-fifth-century Athens saw the development of the Athenian empire, the radicalization of Athenian democracy through the empowerment of poorer citizens, the adornment of the city through a massive and expensive building program, the classical age of Athenian tragedy, the assembly of intellectuals offering novel approaches to philosophical and scientific issues, and the end of the Spartan-Athenian alliance against Persia and the beginning of open hostilities between the two greatest powers of ancient Greece. The Athenian statesman Pericles both fostered and supported many of these developments. Although it is no longer fashionable to view Periclean Athens as a social or cultural paradigm, study of the history, society, art, and literature of mid-fifth-century Athens remains central to any understanding of Greek history. This collection of essays reveal the political, religious, economic, social, artistic, literary, intellectual, and military infrastructure that made the Age of Pericles possible.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Nero

Author: Shadi Bartsch,Kirk Freudenburg,Cedric Littlewood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107052203

Category: Art

Page: 428

View: 2713

A lively and accessible guide to the rich literary, philosophical and artistic achievements of the notorious age of Nero.

Augustan Culture

An Interpretive Introduction

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691058900

Category: History

Page: 474

View: 9567

Grand political accomplishment and artistic productivity were the hallmarks of Augustus Caesar's reign (31 B.C. to A.D. 14), which has served as a powerful model of achievement for societies throughout Western history. Although much research has been done on individual facets of Augustan culture, Karl Galinsky's book is the first in decades to present a unified overview, one that brings together political and social history, art, literature, architecture, and religion. Weaving analysis and narrative throughout a richly illustrated text, Galinsky provides not only an enjoyable account of the major ideas of the age, but also an interpretation of the creative tensions and contradictions that made for its vitality and influence. Galinsky draws on source material ranging from coins and inscriptions to the major works of poetry and art, and challenges the schematic concepts and dichotomies that have commonly been applied to Augustan culture. He demonstrates that this culture was neither monolithic nor the mere result of one man's will. Instead it was a nuanced process of evolution and experimentation. Augustan culture had many contributors, as Galinsky demonstrates, and their dynamic interactions resulted in a high point of creativity and complexity that explains the transcendence of the Augustan age. Far from being static, its sophisticated literary and artistic monuments call for the active response and involvement of the reader and viewer even today.

Augustus

Introduction to the Life of an Emperor

Author: Karl Galinsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521744423

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 6399

In this lively and concise biography Karl Galinsky examines Augustus' life from childhood to deification.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian

Author: Michael Maas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826875

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2993

This book introduces the Age of Justinian, the last Roman century and the first flowering of Byzantine culture. Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I (527–565), this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world. In this volume, twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. It also discusses the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time. Consideration is given to imperial relations with the papacy, northern barbarians, the Persians, and other eastern peoples, shedding new light on a dramatic and highly significant historical period.

The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus

Author: Paul Zanker

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472081240

Category: Architecture

Page: 385

View: 6644

"Art and architecture are mirrors of a society. They reflect the state of its values, especially in times of crisis or transition." Upon this premise Paul Zanker builds an interpretation of Augustan art as a visual language that both expressed and furthered the transformation of Roman society during the rule of Augustus Caesar. The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus illustrates how the establishment of monarchy under Augustus Caesar led to the creation of a new system of visual imagery that reflects the consciousness of this transitional age.

The Cambridge Companion to Latin Love Elegy

Author: Thea S. Thorsen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107511747

Category: Literary Collections

Page: N.A

View: 327

Latin love elegy is one of the most important poetic genres in the Augustan era, also known as the golden age of Roman literature. This volume brings together leading scholars from Australia, Europe and North America to present and explore the Greek and Roman backdrop for Latin love elegy, the individual Latin love elegists (both the canonical and the non-canonical), their poems and influence on writers in later times. The book is designed as an accessible introduction for the general reader interested in Latin love elegy and the history of love and lament in Western literature, as well as a collection of critically stimulating essays for students and scholars of Latin poetry and of the classical tradition.

Augustan Rome

Author: Andrew Wallace-Hadrill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 147253297X

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 5409

Written by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, one of the world's foremost scholars on Roman social and cultural history, this well-established introduction to Rome in the Age of Augustus provides a fascinating insight into the social and physical contexts of Augustan politics and poetry, exploring in detail the impact of the new regime of government on society. Taking an interpretative approach, the ideas and environment manipulated by Augustus are explored, along with reactions to that manipulation. Emphasising the role and impact of art and architecture of the time, and on Roman attitudes and values, Augustan Rome explains how the victory of Octavian at Actium transformed Rome and Roman life. This thought-provoking yet concise volume sets political changes in the context of their impact on Roman values, on the imaginative world of poetry, on the visual world of art, and on the fabric of the city of Rome.

A Companion to Archaic Greece

Author: Kurt A. Raaflaub,Hans van Wees

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118556658

Category: History

Page: 792

View: 5198

A systematic survey of archaic Greek society and culture which introduces the reader to a wide range of new approaches to the period. The first comprehensive and accessible survey of developments in the study of archaic Greece Places Greek society of c.750-480 BCE in its chronological and geographical context Gives equal emphasis to established topics such as tyranny and political reform and newer subjects like gender and ethnicity Combines accounts of historical developments with regional surveys of archaeological evidence and in-depth treatments of selected themes Explores the impact of Eastern and other non-Greek cultures in the development of Greece Uses archaeological and literary evidence to reconstruct broad patterns of social and cultural development

A Companion to the Hellenistic World

Author: Andrew Erskine

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405154411

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 1027

Covering the period from the death of Alexander the Great to the celebrated defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the hands of Augustus, this authoritative Companion explores the world that Alexander created but did not live to see. Comprises 29 original essays by leading international scholars. Essential reading for courses on Hellenistic history. Combines narrative and thematic approaches to the period. Draws on the very latest research. Covers a broad range of topics, spanning political, religious, social, economic and cultural history.

The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus

Author: A. J. Woodman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139828207

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3650

Tacitus is universally recognised as ancient Rome's greatest writer of history, and his account of the Roman Empire in the first century AD has been fundamental in shaping the modern perception of Rome and its emperors. This Companion provides a new, up-to-date and authoritative assessment of his work and influence which will be invaluable for students and non-specialists as well as of interest to established scholars in the field. First situating Tacitus within the tradition of Roman historical writing and his own contemporary society, it goes on to analyse each of his individual works and then discuss key topics such as his distinctive authorial voice and his views of history and freedom. It ends by tracing Tacitus' reception, beginning with the transition from manuscript to printed editions, describing his influence on political thought in early modern Europe, and concluding with his significance in the twentieth century.

Rome and the Greek East to the Death of Augustus

Author: Robert K. Sherk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521271233

Category: History

Page: 181

View: 9233

A collection in English translation of sources for the study of Greek and Roman history.

Geoparsing Early Modern English Drama

Author: M. Matei-Chesnoiu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137469412

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 245

View: 8343

Geo-spatial identity and early Modern European drama come together in this study of how cultural or political attachments are actively mediated through space. Matei-Chesnoiu traces the modulated representations of rivers, seas, mountains, and islands in sixteenth-century plays by Shakespeare, Jasper Fisher, Thomas May, and others.

Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets

Author: John F. Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521516839

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 8995

A comprehensive treatment of the reflections by Augustan poets on Apollo as an imperial icon.

The Second Sophistic

A Cultural Phenomenon in the Roman Empire

Author: Graham Anderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134856849

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 677

Sophism was the single most important movement in second century literature: prose of that period came to be written as entertainment rather than confined to historical subjects. Graham Anderson shows how the Greek sophists' skills in public speaking enabled them to perform effectively across a variety of activities. As he presents the sophists' roles as civic celebrities side-by-side with their roles as transmitters of Hellenic culture and literary artists, a co-ordinated view of the Second Sophistic as a complex phenomenon emerges.

The Cambridge Companion to the Epic

Author: Catherine Bates

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139828274

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 8229

Every great civilisation from the Bronze Age to the present day has produced epic poems. Epic poetry has always had a profound influence on other literary genres, including its own parody in the form of mock-epic. This Companion surveys over four thousand years of epic poetry from the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh to Derek Walcott's postcolonial Omeros. The list of epic poets analysed here includes some of the greatest writers in literary history in Europe and beyond: Homer, Virgil, Dante, Camões, Spenser, Milton, Wordsworth, Keats and Pound, among others. Each essay, by an expert in the field, pays close attention to the way these writers have intimately influenced one another to form a distinctive and cross-cultural literary tradition. Unique in its coverage of the vast scope of that tradition, this book is an essential companion for students of literature of all kinds and in all ages.