The Blanco River

Author: Wes Ferguson

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623495113

Category: Nature

Page: 184

View: 5977

For eighty-seven miles, the swift and shallow Blanco River winds through the Texas Hill Country. Its water is clear and green, darkened by frequent pools. Wes Ferguson and Jacob Botter have paddled, walked, and waded the Blanco. They have explored its history, people, wildlife, and the natural beauty that surprises everyone who experiences this river. Described as “the defining element in some of the Hill Country’s most beautiful scenery,” the Blanco flows both above and below ground, part of a network of rivers and aquifers that sustains the region’s wildlife and millions of humans alike. However, overpumping and prolonged drought have combined to weaken the Blanco’s flow and sustenance, and in 2000—for the first time in recorded history—the river’s most significant feeder spring, Jacob’s Well, briefly ceased to flow. It stopped again in 2008. Then, in the spring of 2015, a devastating flood killed twelve people and toppled the huge cypress trees along its banks, altering not just the look of the river, but the communities that had come to depend on its serene presence. River travelers Ferguson and Botter tell the remarkable story of this changeable river, confronting challenges and dangers as well as rare opportunities to see parts of the river few have seen. The authors also photographed and recorded the human response to the destruction of a beloved natural resource that has become yet another episode in the story of water in Texas. To learn more about The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, sponsors of this book's series, please click here.

The Blanco River

Author: Wes Ferguson

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623495105

Category: Nature

Page: 184

View: 7642

For eighty-seven miles, the swift and shallow Blanco River winds through the Texas Hill Country. Its water is clear and green, darkened by frequent pools. Wes Ferguson and Jacob Botter have paddled, walked, and waded the Blanco. They have explored its history, people, wildlife, and the natural beauty that surprises everyone who experiences this river. Described as “the defining element in some of the Hill Country’s most beautiful scenery,” the Blanco flows both above and below ground, part of a network of rivers and aquifers that sustains the region’s wildlife and millions of humans alike. However, overpumping and prolonged drought have combined to weaken the Blanco’s flow and sustenance, and in 2000—for the first time in recorded history—the river’s most significant feeder spring, Jacob’s Well, briefly ceased to flow. It stopped again in 2008. Then, in the spring of 2015, a devastating flood killed twelve people and toppled the huge cypress trees along its banks, altering not just the look of the river, but the communities that had come to depend on its serene presence. River travelers Ferguson and Botter tell the remarkable story of this changeable river, confronting challenges and dangers as well as rare opportunities to see parts of the river few have seen. The authors also photographed and recorded the human response to the destruction of a beloved natural resource that has become yet another episode in the story of water in Texas. To learn more about The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, sponsors of this book's series, please click here.

Blanco River Pocket Guide

Author: David Ellzey

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781541354647

Category:

Page: 120

View: 7148

Whether you are looking to take a multi-day paddling excursion or just go out for an afternoon splashing with the kids, the Blanco River Pocket Guide has all the detailed information you need. It's designed with a full-color visual layout that allows you to meticulously plan out your trip, aid you with navigation and track your progress down the river. "A must-have guide! It really opens up a river that everyone thought had little or no access."-Chris Johnson, fly fishing guide and owner of Living Waters Fly Fishing "I grew up paddling the Texas Hill Country rivers, and this guide has already opened my eyes to the areas that I never knew existed."-Thomas Flemons, owner of Diablo Kayaks

The Nueces River

Río Escondido

Author: Margie Crisp

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623495164

Category: Nature

Page: 284

View: 7411

First appearing on early Spanish maps as the Río Escondido, or hidden river, and later named Río de las Nueces after the abundant pecan trees along its banks, the Nueces today is a stream of seeming contradictions: a river that runs above and below ground; a geographic reminder of a history both noble and egregious; and a spring-fed stream transformed into a salty, steep-sided channel. From its fresh, clear headwaters on the Edwards Plateau, Margie Crisp and William B. Montgomery follow the river through the mesquite and prickly pear of the South Texas Plains, to the river’s end in Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays on the Gulf of Mexico. With vivid prose and paintings, they record their travels as they explore the length of the river on foot, kayak, and fishing boat, ultimately weaving a vivid portrait of today’s Nueces. Capturing the river’s subtle beauty, abundant wildlife, diverse culture, and unique history of exploration, conflict, and settlement, they reveal the untold story of this enigmatic river with passion, humor, and reverence.

Paddling the Guadalupe

Author: Wayne H. McAlister

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781603440219

Category: Nature

Page: 335

View: 6547

The author introduces readers to the places, people, plants, and animals along the the Guadalupe River that runs from Kerr County, Texas to San Antonio Bay on the Gulf of Mexico.

Running the River

Secrets of the Sabine

Author: Wes Ferguson

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623491274

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 4362

Growing up near the Sabine, journalist Wes Ferguson, like most East Texans, steered clear of its murky, debris-filled waters, where alligators lived in the backwater sloughs and an occasional body was pulled from some out-of-the-way crossing. The Sabine held a reputation as a haunt for a handful of hunters and loggers, more than a few water moccasins, swarms of mosquitoes, and the occasional black bear lumbering through swamp oak and cypress knees. But when Ferguson set out to do a series of newspaper stories on the upper portion of the river, he and photographer Jacob Croft Botter were entranced by the river’s subtle beauty and the solitude they found there. They came to admire the self-described “river rats” who hunted, fished, and swapped stories along the muddy water—plain folk who love the Sabine as much as Hill Country vacationers love the clear waters of the Guadalupe. Determined to travel the rest of the river, Ferguson and Botter loaded their gear and launched into the stretch of river that charts the line between the states and ends at the Gulf of Mexico.

River Secrets

Author: Shannon Hale

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408811995

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 304

View: 7322

War between Bayern and Tira is finally over. To cement the peace with their old sworn enemies, a group from each kingdom will cross to the other for a 'season of friendship'. At first all is well, but mysterious events in the Tiran capital arouse suspicions and anger bubbles just beneath the surface. Enna's friend Razo must find out who is masterminding these events before it's too late and they find themselves trapped in the heart of Tira as war breaks out.

Of Texas Rivers and Texas Art

Author: Andrew Sansom,William E. Reaves

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623495350

Category: Art

Page: 168

View: 5454

In Of Texas Rivers and Texas Art, Andrew Sansom, a leading Texas conservationist, and William E. Reaves, an influential Texas art collector and historian, have teamed up to showcase some of the finest contemporary river art detailing the gorgeous traits of Texas landscapes. The featured artwork comes from Randy Bacon, Mary Baxter, David Caton, Margie Crisp, Keith Davis, Fidencio Duran, Jon Flaming, Charles Ford, Pat Gabriel, Hunter George, Billy Hassell, Lee Jamison, Robb Kendrick, Laura Lewis, William Montgomery, Noe Perez, Jeri Salter, Erik Sprohge, Debbie Stevens, and William Young. Art in service of conservation is nothing new, as Sansom and Reaves note in their introductions. And rivers have figured prominently in the artistic imagination for all of recorded history and probably before that, as evidenced by flood stories and myths preserved in almost all the religious and folk traditions of the world. The collection of work included in this book is exemplary of the strong inspiration that rivers have provided for a vast current of literature, music, and art, in turn shaping their place in life and culture and bringing about a greater appreciation of the stunning beauty of our natural world. To learn more about The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, sponsors of this book's series, please click here.

Texas Whitewater

Author: Stephen Hartley Daniel

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1603446532

Category: Nature

Page: 239

View: 604

Sometimes all that's needed to find whitewater fun and adventure in the Lone Star State is a little rain and perseverance--and this handy guide to more than seventy Texas rivers and creeks with the greatest prospects for whitewater.

Fall River Dreams

A Team's Quest for Glory, A Town's Search for It's Soul

Author: Bill Reynolds

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312134914

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2362

A profile of Fall River's Durfee High School basketball team is set against the backdrop of a once-prosperous textile mill town turned poor and disheartened and follows the team's annual rekindling of community spirit. Reprint.

The Big Book of Texas Ghost Stories

Author: Alan Brown

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 0811748537

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 288

View: 6435

The best ghost stories from the Lone Star State, including . . . • Spirits of the Alamo • The Black Hope Horror • Hauntings at the Driskill Hotel • The legend of El Muerto • Woman Hollering Creek • Stampede Mesa

Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416597158

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1738

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S.C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

Hydrogeological and Environmental Investigations in Karst Systems

Author: Bartolomé Andreo,Francisco Carrasco,Juan José Durán,Pablo Jiménez,James LaMoreaux

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642174353

Category: Science

Page: 638

View: 5093

WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT provides a detailed introduction to the full range of advanced, multidisciplinary techniques used in the study of water resources from understanding individual aquifers to the protection and management of water in a sustainable way, compatible with the preservation of the environment. Based on a masters course from UNESCO’s International Hydrological Program, this textbook is accompanied by color figures and graphics, illustrating clearly the content of the text and showing real examples from the field. Each chapter also contains a list of exercises and practical activities as well as case studies.

Hydrogeological and Environmental Investigations in Karst Systems

Author: Bartolomé Andreo,Francisco Carrasco,Juan José Durán,Pablo Jiménez,James LaMoreaux

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642174353

Category: Science

Page: 638

View: 875

WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT provides a detailed introduction to the full range of advanced, multidisciplinary techniques used in the study of water resources from understanding individual aquifers to the protection and management of water in a sustainable way, compatible with the preservation of the environment. Based on a masters course from UNESCO’s International Hydrological Program, this textbook is accompanied by color figures and graphics, illustrating clearly the content of the text and showing real examples from the field. Each chapter also contains a list of exercises and practical activities as well as case studies.

The works of Hubert Howe Bancroft

Author: Hubert Howe Bancroft

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: British Columbia

Page: N.A

View: 9077

On the Border with Mackenzie

or, Winning West Texas

Author: Capt. R. G. Carter

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1789120179

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 501

View: 4077

When it was first published in 1935, On the Border with Mackenzie, or Winning West Texas from the Comanches quickly became known as the most complete account of the Indian Wars on the Texas frontier during the 1870s, and remains one of the most exhaustive histories ever written by an actual participant in the Texas Indian Wars. The author, Capt. Robert G. Carter, a Union Army veteran and West Point graduate, was appointed in 1870 to serve as second lieutenant in the Fourth United States Cavalry stationed at Fort Concho, Texas. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1900 for his gallantry in action against the Indians occurring on October 10, 1871, during the battle of Blanco Canyon. Led by Col. Ranald Slidell Mackenzie, the Fourth Cavalry moved its headquarters to Fort Richardson, Texas, in 1871 where they soon became one of the most effective units on the western frontier. Among the battles and skirmishes they participated in were the Warren wagon train raid of 1871; the Kicking Bird pursuit of 1871; the Remolino fight of 1873; the Red River War of 1874-75; and the Black Hills War of 1876. “...a splendid contribution to the early frontier history of West Texas...a story filled with humor and pathos, tragedies and triumphs, hunger and thirst, war and adventure.”—L. F. Sheffy “...[Carter] pulls no punches in this outspoken narrative, and the reader always knows where he stands.”—John H. Jenkins, Texas Basic Books “...essential to any study of the Indian Wars of the Southern Plains.”—Charles Robinson, Foreword