The Barbarism of Reason

Max Weber and the Twilight of Enlightenment

Author: Asher Horowitz,Terry Maley

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442638575

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 4953

The recent renewal of interest in Max Weber evidences an attempt to enlist his thought in the service of a renewed dream of Enlightenment individualism. Yet he was the first twentieth-century thinker to fully appreciate the pervasiveness and ambiguity of rationalization which threatened to undermine the hopes of the Enlightenment. Asher Horowitz and Terry Maley present a collection of essays tracing the contemporary significance of Weber's work for the tradition of Enlightenment political thought and its critiques. In its critical inquiry into Weber's thought, The Barbarism of Reason continues the exploration of the limits and prospects of politics in a rationalizing society. The first section comprises a set of both historical and philosophical reflections on the political implications of Weber's central concepts such as disenchantment, rationality, and affectivity, the historical understanding, meaning, and domination. The second section examines the institutional and historical context that framed Weber's inquiries into structures of the modern mode of domination, as well as his understanding of the nature of the modern state. Among the topics broached are Weber's strategic intervention into the development of the liberal theory of the state as well as a critical examination of the theoretical and pre-theoretical roots of his construction of the subject. Another of the essays reveals the schizophrenic structure of modern subjectivity. The third and last section attempts to trace the vicissitudes of Weber's seminal problems concerning rationalization, power, and disenchantment through some of the most important responses to his work in the twentieth century.

Weber and the Weberians

Author: Lawrence Scaff

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137006269

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 3348

Understanding Max Weber's contribution to social theory is vital for students and scholars of social science. This insightful text offers critical discussion of Weber's ideas, focusing on their uses - how they have been appropriated and applied to contemporary events. Written by one of the world's leading Weber scholars, this is an essential read.

Race and the Totalitarian Century

Author: Vaughn Rasberry

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674972996

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 410

View: 6970

Vaughn Rasberry turns to black culture and politics for an alternative history of the totalitarian century. He shows how black writers reimagined the standard anti-fascist, anti-communist narrative through the lens of racial injustice, with the U.S. as a tyrannical force in the Third World but also an agent of Asian and African independence.

Sovereign States Or Political Communities?

Civil Society and Contemporary Politics

Author: Darrow Schecter

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719045691

Category: Social Science

Page: 207

View: 9103

Drawing on the writings of thinkers ranging from Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach and Marx to Weber, Schmitt, Benjamin, Adorno, and Arendt, this book explores the ideas, meaning, and history of civil society, its role in the 1989 revolutions, its role in new social movements and its relationship with the state and the economy.

Politics and Ethics

Author: Patrick Hayden,Tom Lansford

Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 196

View: 9777

Serving as a forum for a diverse array of views and issues, this book fosters the exploration of both theory and practice in the intersecting realms of politics and ethics. The essays presented here run the gamut of topics from global to state concerns; from the brutal conflict in East Timor to the impact of market forces in society. Scholarly research and viewpoints make this collection of papers an important resource for the studying and solving of political and ethical dilemmas.

Dialectic of Enlightenment

Author: Max Horkheimer,Theodor W. Adorno

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 080478809X

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1247

Dialectic of Enlightenment is undoubtedly the most influential publication of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. Written during the Second World War and circulated privately, it appeared in a printed edition in Amsterdam in 1947. "What we had set out to do," the authors write in the Preface, "was nothing less than to explain why humanity, instead of entering a truly human state, is sinking into a new kind of barbarism." Yet the work goes far beyond a mere critique of contemporary events. Historically remote developments, indeed, the birth of Western history and of subjectivity itself out of the struggle against natural forces, as represented in myths, are connected in a wide arch to the most threatening experiences of the present. The book consists in five chapters, at first glance unconnected, together with a number of shorter notes. The various analyses concern such phenomena as the detachment of science from practical life, formalized morality, the manipulative nature of entertainment culture, and a paranoid behavioral structure, expressed in aggressive anti-Semitism, that marks the limits of enlightenment. The authors perceive a common element in these phenomena, the tendency toward self-destruction of the guiding criteria inherent in enlightenment thought from the beginning. Using historical analyses to elucidate the present, they show, against the background of a prehistory of subjectivity, why the National Socialist terror was not an aberration of modern history but was rooted deeply in the fundamental characteristics of Western civilization. Adorno and Horkheimer see the self-destruction of Western reason as grounded in a historical and fateful dialectic between the domination of external nature and society. They trace enlightenment, which split these spheres apart, back to its mythical roots. Enlightenment and myth, therefore, are not irreconcilable opposites, but dialectically mediated qualities of both real and intellectual life. "Myth is already enlightenment, and enlightenment reverts to mythology." This paradox is the fundamental thesis of the book. This new translation, based on the text in the complete edition of the works of Max Horkheimer, contains textual variants, commentary upon them, and an editorial discussion of the position of this work in the development of Critical Theory.

Distinction

A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste

Author: Pierre Bourdieu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113587316X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 640

View: 5235

No judgement of taste is innocent - we are all snobs. Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction brilliantly illuminates the social pretentions of the middle classes in the modern world, focusing on the tastes and preferences of the French bourgeoisie. First published in 1979, the book is at once a vast ethnography of contemporary France and a dissection of the bourgeois mind. In the course of everyday life we constantly choose between what we find aesthetically pleasing, and what we consider tacky, merely trendy, or ugly. Taste is not pure. Bourdieu demonstrates that our different aesth

Capital as Power

A Study of Order and Creorder

Author: Jonathan Nitzan,Shimshon Bichler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134022298

Category: Political Science

Page: 464

View: 7269

Conventional theories of capitalism are mired in a deep crisis: after centuries of debate, they are still unable to tell us what capital is. Liberals and Marxists both think of capital as an ‘economic’ entity that they count in universal units of ‘utils’ or ‘abstract labour’, respectively. But these units are totally fictitious. Nobody has ever been able to observe or measure them, and for a good reason: they don’t exist. Since liberalism and Marxism depend on these non-existing units, their theories hang in suspension. They cannot explain the process that matters most – the accumulation of capital. This book offers a radical alternative. According to the authors, capital is not a narrow economic entity, but a symbolic quantification of power. It has little to do with utility or abstract labour, and it extends far beyond machines and production lines. Capital, the authors claim, represents the organized power of dominant capital groups to reshape – or creorder – their society. Written in simple language, accessible to lay readers and experts alike, the book develops a novel political economy. It takes the reader through the history, assumptions and limitations of mainstream economics and its associated theories of politics. It examines the evolution of Marxist thinking on accumulation and the state. And it articulates an innovative theory of ‘capital as power’ and a new history of the ‘capitalist mode of power’.

Degeneration

Author: Max Simon Nordau

Publisher: London, Heinemann

ISBN: N.A

Category: Comparative literature

Page: 566

View: 1949

Constitutes a moralistic attack on so-called degenerate art and the adverse effects of social phenomena on the human body.

Cemetery of the Murdered Daughters

Feminism, History, and Ingeborg Bachmann

Author: Sara Lennox

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558495524

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 387

View: 8927

Austrian writer Ingeborg Bachmann is widely regarded as one of the most important 20th century authors writing in German. This book examines her poetry and prose in historical context, arguing that the feminist interpretations of her writings are the result of shifts in theoretical emphases over a period of three decades.

The Disenchantment of Art

The Philosophy of Walter Benjamin

Author: Rainer Rochlitz

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9780898624076

Category: Philosophy

Page: 298

View: 8589

Fifty years after his death, Walter Benjamin remains one of the great cultural critics of this century. Despite his renown, however, Benjamin's philosophical ideas remain elusive--often considered a disaggregated set of thoughts not meant to cohere. This book provides a more systematic perspective on Benjamin, laying claim to his status as a philosopher and situating his work in the context of its time. Exploring Benjamin's theory of language, spoken and nonspoken, Rainer Rochlitz shows how Benjamin reconceptualized traditional ideas of language, art, and history. Offering an expansive assessment of a unique twentieth-century thinker, this volume provides an indispensable guide for readers of Benjamin's recently released collected works.

The Good Society

Author: Walter Lippmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351482076

Category: Political Science

Page: 402

View: 5224

The Good Society is a critical text in the history of liberalism. Initially a series of articles published in a variety of Lippmann's favorite magazines, as the whole evolved, it became a frontal assault against totalitarian tendencies within American society. Lippmann took to task those who sought to improve the lot of mankind by undoing the work of their predecessors and by undermining movements in which men struggle to be free. This book is a strong indictment of programs of reform that are at odds with the liberal tradition, and it is critical of those who ask people to choose between security and liberty.The Good Society falls naturally into two segments. In the first, Lippmann shows the errors and common fallacies of faith in government as the solution to all problems. He says, "from left to right, from communist to conservative. They all believe the same fundamental doctrine. All the philosophies go into battle singing the same tune with slightly different words." In the second part of the book, Lippmann offers reasons why liberalism lost sight of its purpose and suggests the first principles on which it can flourish again.Lippmann argues that liberalism's revival is inevitable because no other system of government can work, given the kind of economic world mankind seeks. He did not write The Good Society to please adherents of any political ideology. Lippmann challenges all philosophies of government, and yet manages to present a positive program. Bewildered liberals and conservatives alike will find this work a successful effort to synthesize a theory of liberalism with the practice of a strong democracy. Gary Dean Best has provided the twenty-first century reader a clear-eyed context for interpreting Lippmann's defense of classical liberalism.The Good Society is the eleventh in a series of books written by Walter Lippmann reissued by Transaction with new introductions and in a paperback format. As

How to Change the World

Reflections on Marx and Marxism

Author: Eric Hobsbawm

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300176163

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 470

View: 9286

A penetrating reassessment of Marxist thought and its relevance today, by a world-renowned historian of Marxism

Books in Print Supplement

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 9124

Includes authors, titles, subjects.

In My Father's House

Africa in the Philosophy of Culture

Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199879257

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 5111

The beating of Rodney King and the resulting riots in South Central Los Angeles. The violent clash between Hasidim and African-Americans in Crown Heights. The boats of Haitian refugees being turned away from the Land of Opportunity. These are among the many racially-charged images that have burst across our television screens in the last year alone, images that show that for all our complacent beliefs in a melting-pot society, race is as much of a problem as ever in America. In this vastly important, widely-acclaimed volume, Kwame Anthony Appiah, a Ghanaian philosopher who now teaches at Harvard, explores, in his words, "the possibilities and pitfalls of an African identity in the late twentieth century." In the process he sheds new light on what it means to be an African-American, on the many preconceptions that have muddled discussions of race, Africa, and Afrocentrism since the end of the nineteenth century, and, in the end, to move beyond the idea of race. In My Father's House is especially wide-ranging, covering everything from Pan Africanism, to the works of early African-American intellectuals such as Alexander Crummell and W.E.B. Du Bois, to the ways in which African identity influences African literature. In his discussion of the latter subject, Appiah demonstrates how attempts to construct a uniquely African literature have ignored not only the inescapable influences that centuries of contact with the West have imposed, but also the multicultural nature of Africa itself. Emphasizing this last point is Appiah's eloquent title essay which offers a fitting finale to the volume. In a moving first-person account of his father's death and funeral in Ghana, Appiah offers a brilliant metaphor for the tension between Africa's aspirations to modernity and its desire to draw on its ancient cultural roots. During the Los Angeles riots, Rodney King appeared on television to make his now famous plea: "People, can we all get along?" In this beautiful, elegantly written volume, Appiah steers us along a path toward answering a question of the utmost importance to us all.