The Anatomy of Melancholy

What it Is, with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms, Prognostics, and Several Cures of It. In Three Partitions. With Their Several Sections, Members, and Subsections, Philosophically, Medically, Historically Opened and Cut Up

Author: Robert Burton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Melancholy

Page: N.A

View: 8755

The Essential Anatomy of Melancholy

Author: Robert Burton

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486148580

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 288

View: 7454

One of the richest books in the English language, this systematized medical treatise on morbid mental states also features a compendium of memorable utterances on the human condition, compiled from classical, scholastic, and contemporary sources.

On Being Blue

A Philosophical Inquiry

Author: William H. Gass

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590177185

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 91

View: 3948

Offers an extended essay pondering the color blue and its many associations.

Nyrb Classics 10th Anniversary Complete Collection

Author: RANDOM HOUSE INC,Various,New York Review Book

Publisher: NYRB Classics

ISBN: 9781590173572

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 3279

The NYRB Classics series is designedly and determinedly exploratory and eclectic, a mix of fiction and non-fiction from different eras and times and of various sorts. The series includes nineteenth century novels and experimental novels, reportage and belles lettres, tell-all memoirs and learned studies, established classics and cult favorites, literature high, low, unsuspected, and unheard of. NYRB Classics are, to a large degree, discoveries, the kind of books that people typically run into outside of the classroom and then remember for life. Inevitably literature in translation constitutes a major part of the NYRB Classics series, simply because so much great literature has been left untranslated into English, or translated poorly, or deserves to be translated again, much as any outstanding book asks to be read again. The series started in 1999 with the publication of Richard Hughes's A High Wind in Jamaica. NYRB Classics includes new translations of canonical figures such as Euripides, Dante, Balzac, and Chekhov; fiction by modern and contemporary masters such as Vasily Grossman, Mavis Gallant, Daphne du Maurier, Stefan Zweig, and Upamanyu Chatterjee; tales of crime and punishment by George Simenon and Kenneth Fearing; masterpieces of narrative history and literary criticism, poetry, travel writing, biography, cookbooks, and memoirs from such writers as Norman Mailer, Lionel Trilling, and Patrick Leigh Fermor; and unclassifiable classics on the order of J. R. Ackerley's My Dog Tulip and Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy. Fall 2009 sees the publication of the series' first graphic novel, Poem Strip by Dino Buzzati, translated into English for the first time. Published in handsome uniform trade paperback editions, almost all the 250 NYRB Classics included in this collection feature an introduction by an outstanding writer, scholar, or critic of our day. Taken as a whole, NYRB Classics may be considered a series of books of unrivaled variety and quality for discerning and adventurous readers. This collection includes one each of the following titles: A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes Jakob von Gunten by Robert Walser The Living Thoughts of Kierkegaard by Soren Kierkegaard Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend Warner My Dog Tulip by J.R. Ackerley My Father and Myself by J.R. Ackerley The Other House by Henry James Peasants and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist by Alexander Berkman A Handbook on Hanging by Charles Duff Hindoo Holiday by J.R. Ackerley Memoirs of My Nervous Illness by Daniel Paul Schreber The Wooden Shepherdess by Richard Hughes The Stories of J.F. Powers by J.F. Powers Memoirs of Lorenzo Da Ponte by Lorenzo Da Ponte Morte D'Urban by J.F. Powers Records of Shelley, Byron, and the Author by Edward John Trelawny Wheat that Springeth Green by J.F. Powers Classic Crimes by William Roughead The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren by Iona Opie The Unknown Masterpiece by Honore de Balzac Virgin Soil by Ivan Turgenev The Glass Bees by Ernst Junger The Pure and the Impure by Colette The Waste Books by Georg Christoph Lichtenberg A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr Seven Men by Max Beerbohm To Each His Own by Leonardo Sciascia The Wine-Dark Sea by Leonardo Sciascia Alfred and Guinevere by James Schuyler The Pilgrim Hawk by Glenway Wescott The Fox in the Attic by Richard Hughes The Haunted Looking Glass by Edward Gorey A House and Its Head by Ivy Compton-Burnett Manservant and Maidservant by Ivy Compton-Burnett Hadrian the Seventh by Fr. Rolfe Madame de Pompadour by Nancy Mitford The Quest for Corvo by A.J.A. Symons The Root and the Flower by L.H. Myers The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton Exploits and Adventures of Brigadier Gerard by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Letty Fox by Christina Stead The Golovlyov Family by Shchedrin The Radiance of the King by Camara Laye Eustace and Hilda by L.P. Hartley Seduction and Betrayal by Elizabeth Hardwick Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick A Way of Life, Like Any Other by Darcy O'Brien As a Man Grows Older by Italo Svevo Autobiography of an Unknown Indian by Nirad C. Chaudhuri Renoir, My Father by Jean Renoir An African in Greenland by Tete-Michel Kpomassie Letters: Summer 1926 by Boris Pasternak Mr. Fortune' s Maggot by Sylvia Townsend Warner Selected Works of Cesare Pavese by Cesare Pavese The Life of Henry Brulard by Stendhal On the Yard by Malcolm Braly Selected Stories of Robert Walser by Robert Walser The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll by Alvaro Mutis Mawrdew Czgowchwz by James McCourt The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley The Outcry by Henry James A Book of Mediterranean Food by Elizabeth David Letters from Russia by Astolphe De Custine Miserable Miracle by Henri Michaux Riders in the Chariot by Patrick White Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David Corrigan by Caroline Blackwood Great Granny Webster by Caroline Blackwood Mary Olivier by May Sinclair Randall Jarrell's Book of Stories by Randall Jarrell The New Life by Dante Alighieri The Ten Thousand Things by Maria Dermout The Unpossessed by Tess Slesinger The Middle of the Journey by Lionel Trilling The World of Odysseus by M.I. Finley The Book of My Life by Girolamo Cardano The Moon and the Bonfires by Cesare Pavese Paris Stories by Mavis Gallant Troubles by J.G. Farrell In the Freud Archives by Janet Malcolm The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg A Sorrow Beyond Dreams by Peter Handke The Fountain Overflows by Rebecca West Prisoner of Love by Jean Genet We Always Treat Women Too Well by Raymond Queneau Witch Grass by Raymond Queneau The Stuffed Owl by D.B. Wyndham Lewis To the Finland Station by Edmund Wilson The Vet's Daughter by Barbara Comyns Walter Benjamin by Gershom Scholem Fancies and Goodnights by John Collier Shelley: The Pursuit by Richard Holmes In Parenthesis by David Jones Peking Story by David Kidd Rene Leys by Victor Segalen Black Sun by Geoffrey Wolff Dirty Snow by Georges Simenon The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares The Day of the Owl by Leonardo Sciascia Equal Danger by Leonardo Sciascia Monsieur Proust by Celeste Albaret Three Bedrooms in Manhattan by Georges Simenon The Tenants of Moonbloom by Edward Lewis Wallant The Towers of Trebizond by Rose MacAulay Varieties of Exile by Mavis Gallant My Century by Aleksander Wat The World I Live In by Helen Keller American Humor by Constance Rourke The Ivory Tower by Henry James The Gallery by John Horne Burns Paris and Elsewhere by Richard Cobb Apartment in Athens by Glenway Wescott Envy by Yuri Olesha The Moro Affair by Leonardo Sciascia Nights in the Gardens of Brooklyn by Harvey Swados Part of Our Time by Murray Kempton The Case of Comrade Tulayev by Victor Serge Boredom by Alberto Moravia Contempt by Alberto Moravia The Diary of a Rapist by Evan S. Connell Monsieur Monde Vanishes by Georges Simenon The Siege of Krishnapur by J.G. Farrell W. H. Auden's Book of Light Verse by W. H. Auden Asleep in the Sun by Adolfo Bioy Casares The Bog People by P.V. Glob Moravagine by Blaise Cendrars The Selected Poems of Osip Mandelstam by Osip Mandelstam Cassandra at the Wedding by Dorothy Baker The Furies by Janet Hobhouse Hons and Rebels by Jessica Mitford Indian Summer by William Dean Howells Memoirs of Hecate County by Edmund Wilson The Inferno of Dante Alighieri by Dante Alighieri The Year of the French by Thomas Flanagan Flaubert and Madame Bovary by Francis Steegmuller The Late Mattia Pascal by Luigi Pirandello The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes by W.S. Merwin The Peregrine by J.A. Baker Blood on the Forge by William Attaway The Child by Jules Valles The Lord Chandos Letter by Hugo Von Hofmannsthal The Singapore Grip by J.G. Farrell Count D'Orgel's Ball by Raymond Radiguet War and the Iliad by Simone Weil Anglo-Saxon Attitudes by Angus Wilson The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual by Harold Cruse Kaputt by Curzio Malaparte Memed, My Hawk by Yashar Kemal The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert by Joseph Joubert The Thirty Years War by C.V. Wedgwood Shakespeare by Mark Van Doren The Stalin Front by Gert Ledig Tropic Moon by Georges Simenon Between the Woods and the Water by Patrick Leigh Fermor A Time of Gifts by Patrick Leigh Fermor Jejuri by Arun Kolatkar The Man Who Watched Trains Go By by Georges Simenon Mouchette by Georges Bernanos Warlock by Oakley Hall The New York Stories of Henry James by Henry James Chess Story by Stefan Zweig What's for Dinner? by James Schuyler English, August by Upamanyu Chatterjee Conundrum by Jan Morris Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman Mani by Patrick Leigh Fermor Roumeli by Patrick Leigh Fermor Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig Stoner by John Williams The Big Clock by Kenneth Fearing Red Lights by Georges Simenon The Jeffersonian Transformation by Henry Adams Love in a Fallen City by Eileen Chang A Savage War of Peace by Alistair Horne Clark Gifford's Body by Kenneth Fearing The Strangers in the House by Georges Simenon Pages from the Goncourt Journals by Edmond and Jules de Goncourt They Burn the Thistles by Yashar Kemal Born Under Saturn by Rudolf and Margot Wittkower The Stray Dog Cabaret by Edited by Honor Moore and Catherine Ciepiela Butcher's Crossing by John Williams Dante by Erich Auerbach The Slaves of Solitude by Patrick Hamilton That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana by Carlo Emilio Gadda The Engagement by Georges Simenon The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim The Slynx by Tatyana Tolstaya White Walls by Tatyana Tolstaya Memoirs of Montparnasse by John Glassco The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy The Education Of A Gardener by Russell Page The Book of Ebenezer Le Page by G. B. Edwards Sunflower by Gyula Krudy Novels in Three Lines by Felix Feneon The Goshawk by T. H. White The New York Stories of Edith Wharton by Edith Wharton A Time to Keep Silence by Patrick Leigh Fermor All About H. Hatterr by G. V. Desani Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household Memoirs of an Anti-Semite by Gregor von Rezzori Soul by Andrey Platonov Sheppard Lee, Written by Himself by Robert Montgomery Bird Poems of the Late T'ang by A. C. Graham Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky by Patrick Hamilton Unforgiving Years by Victor Serge Belchamber by Howard Sturgis A Journey Round My Skull by Frigyes Karinthy The Widow by Georges Simenon The Post-Office Girl by Stefan Zweig Afloat by Guy de Maupassant The Family Mashber by Der Nister The Summer Book by Tove Jansson Names on the Land by George R. Stewart Miami and the Siege of Chicago by Norman Mailer Inverted World by Christopher Priest My Fantoms by Theophile Gautier Stones of Aran: Pilgrimage by Tim Robinson In Hazard by Richard Hughes Victorine by Maude Hutchins Grief Lessons by Euripides Rock Crystal by Adalbert Stifter The Liberal Imagination by Lionel Trilling The Queue by Vladimir Sorokin Ringolevio by Emmett Grogan Defeat: Napoleon’s Russian Campaign by Philippe-Paul de Segur Don't Look Now by Daphne Du Maurier The Chrysalids by John Wyndham Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi The Snows of Yesteryear by Gregor von Rezzori The Rider on the White Horse by Theodor Storm School for Love by Olivia Manning Chaos and Night by Henry de Montherlant A Meaningful Life by L. J. Davis Short Letter, Long Farewell by Peter Handke Slow Homecoming by Peter Handke Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salih The Foundation Pit by Andrey Platonov The Complete Fiction by Francis Wyndham The One-Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka The Old Man and Me by Elaine Dundy Summer Will Show by Syliva Townsend Warner Niki by Tibor Dery Hard Rain Falling by Don Carpenter Stones of Aran: Labyrinth by Tim Robinson The Cost of Living by Mavis Gallant Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky Poem Strip by Dino Buzzati No Tomorrow by Vivant Denon The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier

The Waste Books

Author: Georg Christoph Lichtenberg,R. J. Hollingdale

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 9780940322509

Category: Philosophy

Page: 235

View: 5899

German scientist and man of letters Georg Christoph Lichtenberg was an 18th-century polymath: an experimental physicist, an astronomer, a mathematician, a practicing critic both of art and literature. He is most celebrated, however, for the casual notes and aphorisms that he collected in what he called his Waste Books. With unflagging intelligence and encyclopedic curiosity, Lichtenberg wittily deflates the pretensions of learning and society, examines a range of philosophical questions, and tracks his own thoughts down hidden pathways to disconcerting and sometimes hilarious conclusions. Lichtenberg's Waste Books have been greatly admired by writers as very different as Tolstoy, Einstein, and Andre Breton, while Nietzsche and Wittgenstein acknowledged them as a significant inspiration for their own radical work in philosophy. The record of a brilliant and subtle mind in action, The Waste Books are above all a powerful testament to the necessity, and pleasure, of unfettered thought.

The Nature of Melancholy

From Aristotle to Kristeva

Author: Jennifer Radden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198029675

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 392

View: 2651

Spanning 24 centuries, this anthology collects over thirty selections of important Western writing about melancholy and its related conditions by philosophers, doctors, religious and literary figures, and modern psychologists. Truly interdisciplinary, it is the first such anthology. As it traces Western attitudes, it reveals a conversation across centuries and continents as the authors interpret, respond, and build on each other's work. Editor Jennifer Radden provides an extensive, in-depth introduction that draws links and parallels between the selections, and reveals the ambiguous relationship between these historical accounts of melancholy and today's psychiatric views on depression. This important new collection is also beautifully illustrated with depictions of melancholy from Western fine art.

The World of Odysseus

Author: Moses I. Finley

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590170172

Category: History

Page: 205

View: 4324

The World of Odysseus is a concise and penetrating account of the society that gave birth to the Iliad and the Odyssey--a book that provides a vivid picture of the Greek Dark Ages, its men and women, works and days, morals and values. Long celebrated as a pathbreaking achievement in the social history of the ancient world, M.I. Finley's brilliant study remains, as classicist Bernard Knox notes in his introduction to this new edition, "as indispensable to the professional as it is accessible to the general reader"--a fundamental companion for students of Homer and Homeric Greece.

The Bog People

Iron-Age Man Preserved

Author: Peter Vilhelm Glob

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 9781590170908

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 5107

Conceived as a detective story of sorts, "The Bog People" is a fascinating account of the religion, culture, and daily life of Iron Age Europe as revealed when a well-preserved body is found in a Danish bog.

Shakespeare's Montaigne

The Florio Translation of the Essays, A Selection

Author: Michel de Montaigne

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590177347

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 480

View: 5139

An NYRB Classics Original Shakespeare, Nietzsche wrote, was Montaigne’s best reader—a typically brilliant Nietzschean insight, capturing the intimate relationship between Montaigne’s ever-changing record of the self and Shakespeare’s kaleidoscopic register of human character. And there is no doubt that Shakespeare read Montaigne—though how extensively remains a matter of debate—and that the translation he read him in was that of John Florio, a fascinating polymath, man-about-town, and dazzlingly inventive writer himself. Florio’s Montaigne is in fact one of the masterpieces of English prose, with a stylistic range and felicity and passages of deep lingering music that make it comparable to Sir Robert Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy and the works of Sir Thomas Browne. This new edition of this seminal work, edited by Stephen Greenblatt and Peter G. Platt, features an adroitly modernized text, an essay in which Greenblatt discusses both the resemblances and real tensions between Montaigne’s and Shakespeare’s visions of the world, and Platt’s introduction to the life and times of the extraordinary Florio. Altogether, this book provides a remarkable new experience of not just two but three great writers who ushered in the modern world.

The Adventures of Maqroll

Four Novellas

Author: Alvaro Mutis

Publisher: Harpercollins

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 369

View: 7921

Four novellas about the charismatic Maqroll follow him all over the world, finding gold in a South American mine, on a ship transporting Muslim pilgrims to Mecca, and back home caring for the son of a friend who died tragically.

The Living Thoughts of Kierkegaard

Author: Søren Kierkegaard

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 0940322137

Category: Philosophy

Page: 245

View: 839

This celebrated book is not only a remarkable anthology of the work of a central modern thinker, but a meeting of two extraordinary minds. Kierkegaard exercised a deep and transformative influence on W.H. Auden. Auden's selection draws on his published and private writings, introducing the main themes of his philosophy and displaying his extraordinary talents as a writer.

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

Author: Nicholas Carr

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393079364

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 5854

Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”—Michael Agger, Slate “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.

Moravagine

Author: Blaise Cendrars

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590170636

Category: Fiction

Page: 229

View: 9032

At once truly appalling and appallingly funny, Blaise Cendrars's Moravagine bears comparison with Naked Lunch--except that it's a lot more entertaining to read. Heir to an immense aristocratic fortune, mental and physical mutant Moravagine is a monster, a man in pursuit of a theorem that will justify his every desire. Released from a hospital for the criminally insane by his starstruck psychiatrist (the narrator of the book), who foresees a companionship in crime that will also be an unprecedented scientific collaboration, Moravagine travels from Moscow to San Antonio to deepest Amazonia, engaged in schemes and scams as, among other things, terrorist, speculator, gold prospector, and pilot. He also enjoys a busy sideline in rape and murder. At last, the two friends return to Europe--just in time for World War I, when "the whole world was doing a Moravagine." This new edition of Cendrars's underground classic is the first in English to include the author's afterword, "How I Wrote Moravagine."

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti

Author: Milton Rokeach

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590173848

Category: Psychology

Page: 342

View: 8126

At Ypsilanti State Hospital in 1959, the social psychologist Milton Rokeach brought together three paranoid schizophrenics. The men had one thing in common: each believed himself to be Jesus Christ. Their meeting and the two years they spent in one another's company serves as the basis for an investigation into the nature of human identity, belief, and delusion.

Some Anatomies of Melancholy

Author: Robert Burton

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141963336

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 160

View: 6147

Not simply an investigation into melancholy, these unique essays form part of a panoramic celebration of human behaviour from the time of the ancients to the Renaissance. God, devils, old age, diet, drunkenness, love and beauty are each given equal consideration in this all-encompassing examination of the human condition. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns & Fairies

A Study in Folk-lore & Psychical Research

Author: Robert Kirk,Andrew Lang

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 92

View: 2122

Mr. Lang’s book is the most curious imaginable. Written in 1691 by a Scotch divine, it is nothing less than a calm assumption of the existence at that time of a commonwealth of elves, fauns, and fairies, whose government, habits, etc., are minutely described upon the authority of "Men of Second Sight" (it is not clear whether the author himself was one of these by virtue of bis being a seventh son), the method of obtaining which gift is also carefully explained. These fairies are of a middle nature between man and angel; they inhabit subterranean abodes, which they change at each quarter of the year. "They are distributed in tribes and orders, and have children, nurses, marriages, deaths, and burials; their apparel and speech is like that of the people and country under which they live; they are said to have aristocratical rulers and laws, but no discernible religion, love, or devotion towards God," their weapons are most what solid earthly bodies, nothing of iron, but much of stone, like to yellow soft flint spa, shaped liked a barbed arrow-head, but flung like a dart, with great force." The moral character of these "subterraneans" is minutely described and the conclusion is, "But for swearing and intemperance, they are not observed so subject to those irregularities, as to envy, spite, hypocrisy, lying, and dissimulation." The author adds to the evidence given by his friends, etc., a letter from Lord Tarbott to the Hon. Robert Boyle, in which many additional instances of second sight are narrated.

Against Happiness

In Praise of Melancholy

Author: Eric G. Wilson

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 9781429944212

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 8771

Americans are addicted to happiness. When we're not popping pills, we leaf through scientific studies that take for granted our quest for happiness, or read self-help books by everyone from armchair philosophers and clinical psychologists to the Dalai Lama on how to achieve a trouble-free life: Stumbling on Happiness; Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment; The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living. The titles themselves draw a stark portrait of the war on melancholy. More than any other generation, Americans of today believe in the transformative power of positive thinking. But who says we're supposed to be happy? Where does it say that in the Bible, or in the Constitution? In Against Happiness, the scholar Eric G. Wilson argues that melancholia is necessary to any thriving culture, that it is the muse of great literature, painting, music, and innovation—and that it is the force underlying original insights. Francisco Goya, Emily Dickinson, Marcel Proust, and Abraham Lincoln were all confirmed melancholics. So enough Prozac-ing of our brains. Let's embrace our depressive sides as the wellspring of creativity. What most people take for contentment, Wilson argues, is living death, and what the majority takes for depression is a vital force. In Against Happiness: In Praise of Melancholy, Wilson suggests it would be better to relish the blues that make humans people.

In the Heart of the Heart of the Country

And Other Stories

Author: William H. Gass

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590177916

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 3973

First published in 1968, In the Heart of the Heart of the Country established William Gass as one of America’s finest and boldest writers of fiction, and nearly fifty years later, the book still stands as a landmark of contemporary fiction. The two novellas and three short stories it contains are all set in the Midwest, and together they offer a mythical reimagining of America’s heartland, with its punishing extremes of heat and cold, its endless spaces and claustrophobic households, its hidden and baffled desires, its lurking threat of violence. Exploring and expanding the limits of the short story, Gass works magic with words, words that are as squirming, regal, and unexpected as the roaches, boys, icicles, neighbors, and neuroses that fill these pages, words that shock, dazzle, illumine, and delight.

The Anatomy of Melancholy

What it Is, with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms, Prognostics, and Several Cures of it ... by Democritus Minor

Author: Robert Burton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Melancholy

Page: 747

View: 5409

From Melancholia to Prozac

A history of depression

Author: Clark Lawlor

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191633860

Category: Science

Page: 278

View: 7724

Depression is an experience known to millions. But arguments rage on aspects of its definition and its impact on societies present and past: do drugs work, or are they merely placebos? Is the depression we have today merely a construct of the pharmaceutical industry? Is depression under- or over-diagnosed? Should we be paying for expensive 'talking cure' treatments like psychoanalysis or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy? Here, Clark Lawlor argues that understanding the history of depression is important to understanding its present conflicted status and definition. While it is true that our modern understanding of the word 'depression' was formed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the condition was originally known as melancholia, and characterised by core symptoms of chronic causeless sadness and fear. Beginning in the Classical period, and moving on to the present, Lawlor shows both continuities and discontinuities in the understanding of what we now call depression, and in the way it has been represented in literature and art. Different cultures defined and constructed melancholy and depression in ways sometimes so different as to be almost unrecognisable. Even the present is still a dynamic history, in the sense that the 'new' form of depression, defined in the 1980s and treated by drugs like Prozac, is under attack by many theories that reject the biomedical model and demand a more humanistic idea of depression - one that perhaps returns us to a form of melancholy.