Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs

A Practical Guide

Author: Alice Hammel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 842

The Second Edition of Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs offers updated accounts of music educators' experiences, featured as vignettes throughout the book. An accompanying Practical Resource includes lesson plans, worksheets, and games for classroom use. As a practical guide and reference manual, Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs, Second Edition addresses special needs in the broadest possible sense to equip teachers with proven, research-based curricular strategies that are grounded in both best practice and current special education law. Chapters address the full range of topics and issues music educators face, including parental involvement, student anxiety, field trips and performances, and assessment strategies. The book concludes with an updated list of resources, building upon the First Edition's recommendations.

Teaching Music to Students with Autism

Author: Alice M. Hammel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 164

View: 367

This book is the first resource to provide a comprehensive study of the music education of students with autism. Topics include: diagnosis, advocacy, and a collegial team-approach, as well as communication, cognition, behavior, sensory, and socialization challenges.

An Attitude and Approach for Teaching Music to Special Learners

Author: Elise S. Sobol

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 198

View: 830

This book is an international handbook of inspirational wisdom for teaching music universally to enhance the learning potential in children of all ages, backgrounds, and capabilities.

Music for All

Author: Lois Birkenshaw-Fleming

Publisher: Alfred Music

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 132

View: 239

This book is designed to teach music to people with special needs. Many of the activities and suggestions in this book could as easily come under the heading of recreational music, that is, the use of music for sheer enjoyment. For people with special needs, recreational music is tremendously important and can provide a safe place for the development of social skills, the release of emotions, and the satisfaction that comes from making music with others. Chapters cover dealing with specific disabilities and include activities that will facilitate the teaching of students who have these problems, "Books, Records, and Tapes" gives suggestions for further sources of information, and a section of addresses of various organizations provides places to obtain materials.

Teaching the Postsecondary Music Student with Disabilities

Author: Kimberly A. McCord

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 115

Teaching the Postsecondary Music Student with Disabilities provides valuable information and practical strategies for teaching the college music student. With rising numbers of students with disabilities in university music schools, professors are being asked to accommodate students in their studios, classes, and ensembles. Most professors have little training or experience in teaching students with disabilities. This book provides a resource for creating an inclusive music education for students who audition and enter music school. Teaching the Postsecondary Music Student with Disabilities covers all of the topics that all readers need to know including law, assistive technology, high-incidence and low-incidence disabilities, providing specific details on the disability and how it impacts the learning of the music student.

Including Everyone

Creating Music Classrooms Where All Children Learn

Author: Judith Jellison

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 904

Many practical books for music educators who work with special needs students focus on students' disabilities, rather than on the inclusive classroom more generally. In Including Everyone: Creating Music Classrooms Where All Children Learn, veteran teacher and pedagogue Judith Jellison offers a new approach that identifies broader principles of inclusive music instruction writ large. As she demonstrates in this aptly-titled book, the perceived impediments to successfully including the wide diversity of children in schools in meaningful music instruction often stem not from insurmountable obstacles but from a lack of imagination. How do teachers and parents create diverse musical communities in which all children develop skills, deepen understanding, and cultivate independence in a culture of accomplishment and joy? Including Everyone equips music teachers with five principles of effective instruction for mixed special needs / traditional settings that are applicable in both classroom and rehearsal rooms alike. These five guidelines lay out Jellison's argument for a new way to teach music that shifts attention away from thinking of children in terms of symptoms. The effective teacher, argues Jellison, will strive to offer a curriculum that will not only allow the child with a disability to be more successful, but will also apply to and improve instruction for typically developing students. In this compelling new book, Judith Jellison illustrates what it takes to imagine, create, and realize possibilities for all children in ways that inspire parents, teachers, and the children themselves to take part in collaborative music making. Her book helps readers recognize how this most central component of human culture is one that allows everyone to participate, learn, and grow. Jellison is a leader in her field, and the wealth of knowledge she makes available in this book is extensive and valuable. It should aid her peers and inspire a new generation of student teachers.

The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in American Music Education

Author: Colleen M. Conway

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 681

View: 618

While qualitative research has become increasingly popular in music education over the last decade, there is no source that explains the terms, approaches and issues associated with this method. In The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in American Music Education, editor Colleen Conway and the contributing music educators will provide that clarification, as well as models of qualitative studies within various music education disciplines. The handbook outlines the history of qualitative research in music education and explores the contemporary use of qualitative approaches in examining issues related to music teaching and learning. It includes 32 chapters and is divided into five parts. Part I defines qualitative research and examines historical, philosophical and ethical issues associated with its use in music education. Part II discusses ways of approaching qualitative research including: case study, ethnography, phenomenology, narrative inquiry, practitioner inquiry, and mixed methods. Ways of collecting and analyzing data are examined in the third part of the text (observations, interviews, document analysis, music as data and technology). Part IV examines various music teaching and learning contexts that have been studied using qualitative approaches including: early childhood, general, instrumental-band, instrumental-string, choral, preservice and inservice teacher education, adult and community settings, student with exceptionalities, underserved populations, and world music. The final section of the book tackles permission to conduct research, teacher qualitative research, publishing qualitative research and direction for the future. An ambitious and much-needed volume, this handbook will stand as a key resource for drawing meaning from the experiences of students and teachers in music classrooms and communities.

From the Stage to the Studio

How Fine Musicians Become Great Teachers

Author: Cornelia Watkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 320

View: 438

"The fact is, you will teach." from the Foreword by Stephen Clapp, Dean Emeritus, The Julliard School. Whether serving on the faculty at a university, maintaining a class of private students, or fulfilling an invitation as guest artist in a master class series, virtually all musicians will teach during their careers. From the Stage to the Studio speaks directly to the performing musician, highlighting the significant advantages of becoming distinguished both as a performer and a pedagogue. Drawing on over sixty years of combined experience, authors Cornelia Watkins and Laurie Scott provide the guidance and information necessary for any musician to translate his or her individual approach into productive and rewarding teacher-student interactions. Premised on the synergistic relationship between teaching and performing, this book provides a structure for clarifying the essential elements of musical artistry, and connects them to such tangible situations as setting up a studio, teaching a master class, interviewing for a job, judging competitions, and recruiting students. From the Stage to the Studio serves as an essential resource for university studio faculty, music pedagogy teachers, college music majors, and professionals looking to add effective teaching to their artistic repertoire.