Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs

A Label-Free Approach

Author: Alice M. Hammel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 531

The Second Edition of Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs offers updated accounts of music educators' experiences, featured as vignettes throughout the book. An accompanying Practical Resource includes lesson plans, worksheets, and games for classroom use. As a practical guide and reference manual, Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs, Second Edition addresses special needs in the broadest possible sense to equip teachers with proven, research-based curricular strategies that are grounded in both best practice and current special education law. Chapters address the full range of topics and issues music educators face, including parental involvement, student anxiety, field trips and performances, and assessment strategies. The book concludes with an updated list of resources, building upon the First Edition's recommendations.

Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs

A Practical Resource

Author: Alice Hammel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 937

Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Practical Resource brings together theory, policy, and planning for instruction in K-12 classrooms. The resource is a result of collaboration between K-12 teachers, outstanding undergraduate and graduate music education students, and professionals in the field. The lesson ideas, lesson plans, and unit plans are organized according to the six domains posited by Alice Hammel and Ryan Hourigan in their book, Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Label-free Approach, Second Edition. This book equips music educators with understanding necessary to implement teaching ideas into the domains of cognition, communication, behavior, emotions, and physical and sensory needs. Classroom-tested lesson plans include procedure outlines and assessments as well as guides for adaptation, accommodation, and modification needed for successful implementation in K-12 classrooms. As such, this eminently useful guide provides teachers with enough practical ideas to allow them to begin to create and adapt their own lesson plans for use with students of differing needs and abilities.

Teaching Music to Students with Autism

Author: Alice M. Hammel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 208

View: 561

Teaching Music to Students with Autism is a comprehensive resource for everyone who works with students with autism within the music classroom. The authors focus on understanding autism, advocating for students and music programs, and creating and maintaining a team approach by working together with colleagues effectively. A significant portion of the book is focused on understanding and overcoming the communication, cognition, behavior, sensory, and socialization challenges inherent in working with students with autism. The authors suggest ways to structure classroom experiences and learning opportunities for all students. The book includes vignettes and classroom snapshots from experienced music teachers which provide additional opportunities to transfer theory to real-life application.

From the Stage to the Studio

How Fine Musicians Become Great Teachers

Author: Cornelia Watkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 320

View: 514

"The fact is, you will teach." from the Foreword by Stephen Clapp, Dean Emeritus, The Julliard School. Whether serving on the faculty at a university, maintaining a class of private students, or fulfilling an invitation as guest artist in a master class series, virtually all musicians will teach during their careers. From the Stage to the Studio speaks directly to the performing musician, highlighting the significant advantages of becoming distinguished both as a performer and a pedagogue. Drawing on over sixty years of combined experience, authors Cornelia Watkins and Laurie Scott provide the guidance and information necessary for any musician to translate his or her individual approach into productive and rewarding teacher-student interactions. Premised on the synergistic relationship between teaching and performing, this book provides a structure for clarifying the essential elements of musical artistry, and connects them to such tangible situations as setting up a studio, teaching a master class, interviewing for a job, judging competitions, and recruiting students. From the Stage to the Studio serves as an essential resource for university studio faculty, music pedagogy teachers, college music majors, and professionals looking to add effective teaching to their artistic repertoire.

Learning disabilities

the interaction of learner, task, and setting

Author: Corinne Roth Smith

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 630

View: 791

This fourth edition examines the characteristics of individuals with learning disabilities and how their success is mediated by the demands and attitudes of their families and school environments. The book takes an ecological perspective on learning disabilities. A focus on multicultural diversity issues is included in special sections throughout. It is written in a readable style with many anecdotes and over 45 personal vignettes contributed by individuals with learning disabilities, their parents, teachers, and psychologists. Topics to this new edition include: the concept of learning disabilities; causes of learning disabilities; task and setting contributors; academic development; social-emotional development; assessment; and more. Educators of students with learning disabilities.

Teacher

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Activity programs in education

Page:

View: 999

Film & video finder

Author: National Information Center for Educational Media

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 630

Label-free Learning

Supporting Learners with Disabilities

Author: Charlotte Hendrick Keefe

Publisher: Stenhouse Pub

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 714

Teachers as well as students benefit when reliable, proven teaching strategies are applied. The area of special education is not an exception, and as more classroom teachers are becoming involved with children who have learning disabilities, they are finding ways to extend their teaching techniques to reach these students and make them part of the classroom community. With a focus on literacy development, Charlotte Keefe uses the principles of whole language to view these learners and their learning needs from a positive perspective. With a rich combination of theory, demonstrations, teaching strategies, methods of evaluation, and real teachers' experiences, she demonstrates how to view children with learning difficulties as readers and writers without measuring their worth against arbitrary standards of "average" or grade-level performance. Using real classroom examples, she discusses ways of establishing a learner-centered literacy program that supports individual learners' needs without resorting to traditional labels for those who perform "below average" in reading and writing. By avoiding the deficit model, she provides a new viewpoint for evaluating progress and writing IEPs. And, extending the idea of community beyond the classroom, she offers suggestions for collaborating with other teachers and parents to ensure continuity of support. Here are ideas as well as encouragement for teachers who want to change their reading and writing programs from a curriculum-centered to a learner-centered approach and who are looking for alternatives to traditional curriculums. Label-Free Learning is a valuable resource of practical, hands-on knowledge, whether it is used in an inservice workshop or as a text in preservice special education courses.