Taiwanese culture, Taiwanese society

a critical review of social science research done on Taiwan

Author: Stephen O. Murray,Keelung Hong

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 9890

This book provides a critical introduction to a large literature of anthropological and sociological works in Chinese, English, and French by American and American-trained social scientists who have conducted research on Taiwan. It is both a critical survey of what has been written about Taiwan and a contribution to the historical sociology of knowledge. All anthropological and sociological writings are annotated, along with the more important political science, psychology, and economic works. To provide readers unfamiliar with the literature a starting point, the authors have identified what they consider the best work within each topic area.

Looking Through Taiwan

American Anthropologists' Collusion with Ethnic Domination

Author: Keelung Hong,Stephen O. Murray

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803224354

Category: Political Science

Page: 161

View: 4711

This analysis of a troubling chapter in American anthropology reveals what happens when anthropologists fail to make fundamental ethic and political distinctions in their work. The authors examine how Taiwanese realities have been represented and misrepresented in American social science literature.

Memories of the Future

National Identity Issues and the Search for a New Taiwan

Author: Stéphane Corcuff

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 9780765607928

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 485

The product of five years of North American Taiwan Studies Conferences, this book carefully analyzes the emergence of national feelings in Taiwan, its historical roots and its contemporary manifestations. It addresses questions central to the looming international issue of Taiwan/China. Part one considers the historical events that help to explain the emergence and development of a separatist, dissident discourse. The second part deals with the current issue of national identity transition in Taiwan. The final part places the national identity debate in a broader perspective by focusing on the larger issues of the maturation of the national identity question.

Taiwan's Social Movements under Ma Ying-jeou

From the Wild Strawberries to the Sunflowers

Author: Dafydd Fell

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317198557

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 2995

In the spring of 2014, the Sunflower Movement’s three-week occupation of the Legislative Yuan brought Taiwan back to international media attention. It was the culmination of a series of social movements that had been growing in strength since 2008 and have become even more salient since the spring of 2014. Social movements in Taiwan have emerged as a powerful new actor that needs to be understood alongside those players that have dominated the literature such as political parties, local factions, Taishang, China and the United States. This book offers readers an introduction to the development of these social movements in Taiwan by examining a number of important movement case studies that focus on the post 2008 period. The return of the Kuomintang (KMT) to power radically changed the political environment for Taiwan’s civil society and so the book considers how social activists responded to this new political opportunity structure. The case chapters are based on extensive fieldwork and are written by authors from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and methodological approaches; in some cases authors combine being both academics and activists themselves. Together, the chapters focus on a number of core issues, providing the book with four key aims. Firstly, it investigates the roots of the movements and considers how to best explain their emergence. Secondly, it examines the development trajectories of these movements. Thirdly, it looks at the best way to explain their impact and development patterns, and finally it assesses their overall impact, questioning whether they can be regarded as successes or failures. Covering a unique range of social movement cases, the book will be of interest to students and researchers interested in Taiwanese society and politics, as well as social movements and civil society.

Religion and the Formation of Taiwanese Identities

Author: P. Katz,M. Rubenstein

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1403981736

Category: Science

Page: 294

View: 6317

This volume centres on the creation of varied forms of individual and group identity in Taiwan, and the relationship between these forms of identity, both individual and collective, and patterns of Taiwanese religion, politics, and culture. The contributors explore the Taiwanese people's sense of who they are, attempting to discern how they identify themselves as individuals and as collectives and then try to determine the identity/roles individuals and groups construct for themselves. Ranging from the local essays to the national level and within the larger Chinese cultural/religious universe, these essays explore the complex nature of identity/role and the processes of identity formation which have shaped Taiwan's multileveled past and its many faceted present.

Tanners of Taiwan

Life Strategies and National Culture

Author: Scott Simon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429976623

Category: Political Science

Page: 196

View: 5631

Tanners of Taiwan is an ethnography of identity construction set in the leather-tanning communities of Southern Taiwan. Through life history analysis and ethnographic observation, Simon examines what it means to be Chinese - or alternatively Taiwanese - in contemporary Taiwan. Under forty years of martial law from 1947 to 1987, the Chinese Nationalist Party tried to create a Chinese identity in Taiwan through ideological campaigns that reached deep into families, schools and workplaces. They justified their rule through a development narrative that Chinese culture and good policy contributed to the prosperity of the Taiwan miracle. These ideological claims and cultural identities, however, have never been fully accepted in Southern Taiwan. This ethnography is the first to document from the ground level how those claims have been contested, and how a new Taiwanese identity has been constructed since democratization. Tanners of Taiwan provides more than a description of workplaces in Taiwan. Looking at the different perspectives of tanners, women managers, and workers, it demonstrates how cultural and other identities are constructed through dynamics of power and political economy. A small, affordable case studies book to be assigned with a core textbook in introductory anthropology courses. Shows how the US reader is connected to the seemingly distant lives of Taiwanese tanners. Simon follows hides from the US to tanneries in Taiwan, then elsewhere to be made into shoes and other leather goods, and then back to the consumer in the US - demonstrating concretely the notion of "global interconnectedness." Anchored in personal observation and ethnographic detail, the book makes very tangible such otherwise abstract notions as "national identity" and "global integration."

Is Taiwan Chinese?

The Impact of Culture, Power, and Migration on Changing Identities

Author: Melissa J. Brown

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520231821

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 7323

Annotation Melissa Brown looks at the issue of Tiawan - specifically whether or not the Taiwanese are of Chinese/Han ethnicity (as is claimed by the Chinese government) - or is there in fact a Taiwanese ethnicity that is in fact unique unto itself (as the Taiwanese claim).

Foundations of Chinese Psychology

Confucian Social Relations

Author: Kwang-Kuo Hwang

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461414391

Category: Psychology

Page: 378

View: 8558

Mainstream psychology emanated from European-American and Judeo-Christian philosophical and scientific traditions. The application of this viewpoint, which embeds colonial and imperialist concepts is less relevant to Asian and other indigenous cultures. Although it has been accepted by non-Western scholars in an attempt to emulate Western scientific practice, the mainstream viewpoint is in a process of transformation to accommodate geographically relevant perspectives. In this light, Foundations of Chinese Psychology, bridges the gap between western and eastern traditions and elaborates on theories based on local phenomena, findings, and experiences by research methods that are contextually appropriate. Using a guiding principle of cultural psychology – ‘one mind, many mentalities’, this book advocates the balancing of a global psychology concept without sacrificing that of a specific locality and people. It analyzes the basics of Confucionism and compares them to Western ethical thinking, arriving at a series of theories concerning social exchange, face, achievement motivation, organizational behaviors, and conflict resolution. Beyond the specifics of a particular culture, this book exemplifies the act of constructing autonomous social science that may be emulated in other non-Western settings. It also serves as an excellent guide for cross-cultural research as well as a caveat on the limitations of presumptive individualism and exclusionary perspectives.

The Margins of Becoming

Identity and Culture in Taiwan

Author: Carsten Storm,Mark Harrison

Publisher: Otto Harrassowitz Verlag

ISBN: 9783447054546

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 575

In recent years the question of identity has become paramount in public and academic discourse in and about Taiwan. The formation of a Taiwanese identity has to be undertaken vis-a-vis the Chinese mainland and within a pluralistic and highly heterogeneous society. Contesting images of what exactly Taiwanese identity is and of how people can put it into praxis are negotiated along a multitude of global, regional and local borders as well as competing political, economic, cultural, ethnic etc. interests. This book deals with a variety of facets of identity in Taiwan and explores processes of identity construction within different frameworks. It covers aspects of language, politics of memory, education, media, literature, and epistemology and delivers a critical account of the margins that delimit the process of Taiwanese identity formation on different levels, or in a positive reading, of chances and options in re-negotiating the Taiwanese subject. At the same time this endeavour is heavily influenced by discourses of marginalisation and resistance, which until now both foster the formation of Taiwanese identities rather than a homogeneous identity.

Latin American male homosexualities

Author: Stephen O. Murray

Publisher: Univ of New Mexico Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 5645

Offers historical and cultural analysis of indigenous conceptions of male homosexuality in South America.

Getting Saved in America

Taiwanese Immigration and Religious Experience

Author: Carolyn Chen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400824176

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 9285

What does becoming American have to do with becoming religious? Many immigrants become more religious after coming to the United States. Taiwanese are no different. Like many Asian immigrants to the United States, Taiwanese frequently convert to Christianity after immigrating. But Americanization is more than simply a process of Christianization. Most Taiwanese American Buddhists also say they converted only after arriving in the United States even though Buddhism is a part of Taiwan's dominant religion. By examining the experiences of Christian and Buddhist Taiwanese Americans, Getting Saved in America tells "a story of how people become religious by becoming American, and how people become American by becoming religious." Carolyn Chen argues that many Taiwanese immigrants deal with the challenges of becoming American by becoming religious. Based on in-depth interviews with Taiwanese American Christians and Buddhists, and extensive ethnographic fieldwork at a Taiwanese Buddhist temple and a Taiwanese Christian church in Southern California, Getting Saved in America is the first book to compare how two religions influence the experiences of one immigrant group. By showing how religion transforms many immigrants into Americans, it sheds new light on the question of how immigrants become American.

Why Taiwan Matters

Small Island, Global Powerhouse

Author: Shelley Rigger

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442230029

Category: Political Science

Page: 228

View: 9079

Now in an updated paperback edition, Why Taiwan Matters offers a comprehensive but compact introduction to a country that exercises a role in the world far greater than its tiny size would indicate. Leading expert Shelley Rigger explains how Taiwan became such a key global player, highlighting economic and political breakthroughs so impressive they have been called "miracles." She links these accomplishments to Taiwan's determined society, vibrant culture, and unique history. Drawing on arts, economics, politics, and international relations, Rigger explores Taiwan's importance to China, the United States, and the world. Considering where Taiwan may be headed in its wary standoff with China, she traces how the focus of Taiwan's domestic politics has shifted to a Taiwan-centered strategy. All readers interested in Asia and international affairs will find this an accessible and entertaining overview, replete with human interest stories and colorful examples of daily life in Taiwan.

Literature, Modernity, and the Practice of Resistance

Japanese and Taiwanese Fiction, 1960-1990

Author: Margaret Hillenbrand

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004154787

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 357

View: 4196

This book is a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary study which compares responses to modernity in the literary cultures of contemporary Japan and Taiwan. Moving beyond the East-West paradigm that has traditionally dominated comparativism, the volume explores these literatures within the regional frame.

Notes of a Crocodile

Author: Miaojin Qiu

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 168137076X

Category: FICTION

Page: 242

View: 1390

Set in the post-martial-law era of 1990s Taipei, Notes of a Crocodiledepicts the coming-of-age of a group of queer misfits discovering love, friendship, and artistic affinity while hardly studying at Taiwan's most prestigious university. Told through the eyes of an anonymous lesbian narrator nicknamed Lazi, Qiu Miaojin's cult classic novel is a postmodern pastiche of diaries, vignettes, mash notes, aphorisms, exegesis, and satire by an incisive prose stylist and countercultural icon. Afflicted by her fatalistic attraction to Shui Ling, an older woman who is alternately hot and cold toward her, Lazi turns for support to a circle of friends that includes the devil-may-care, rich-kid-turned-criminal Meng Sheng and his troubled, self-destructive gay lover Chu Kuang, as well as the bored, mischievous overachiever Tun Tun and her alluring slacker artist girlfriend Zhi Rou. Bursting with the optimism of newfound liberation and romantic idealism despite corroding innocence, Notes of a Crocodileis a poignant and intimate masterpiece of social defiance by a singular voice in contemporary Chinese literature.

State and Society in the Taiwan Miracle

Author: Thomas B. Gold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317459407

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 3939

Explores the application of constructivist theory to international relations. The text examines the relevance of constructivism for empirical research, focusing on some of the key issues of contemporary international politics: ethnic and national identity; gender; and political economy.

Envisioning Taiwan

Fiction, Cinema, and the Nation in the Cultural Imaginary

Author: June Yip

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822333678

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 2199

DIVTraces the growth and evolution of a Taiwan's sense of itself as a separate and distinct entity by examining the diverse ways a discourse of nation has been produced in the Taiwanese cultural imagination./div

Citizenship Curriculum in Asia and the Pacific

Author: David L. Grossman,Wing On Lee,Kerry J. Kennedy

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402087454

Category: Education

Page: 268

View: 6466

Based on case studies of 11 societies in the world’s most dynamic region, this book signals a new direction of study at the intersection of citizenship education and the curriculum. Following their successful volume, Citizenship Education in Asia and the Pacific: Concepts and Issues (published as No. 14 in this series), the editors, widely regarded as leaders in the field in the Asia-Pacific region, have gone beyond broad citizenship education frameworks to examine the realities, tensions and pressures that influence the formation of the citizenship curriculum. Chapter authors from different societies have addressed two fundamental questions: (1) how is citizenship education featured in the current curriculum reform agenda in terms of both policy contexts and values; and (2) to what extent do the reforms in citizenship education reflect current debates within the society? From comparative analysis of these 11 case studies the editors have found a complex picture of curriculum reform that indicates deep tensions between global and local agendas. On one hand, there is substantial evidence of an increasingly common policy rhetoric in the debates about citizenship education. On the other, it is evident that this discourse does not necessarily extend to citizenship curriculum, which in most places continues to be constructed according to distinctive social, political and cultural contexts. Whether the focus is on Islamic values in Pakistan, an emerging discourse about Chinese ‘democracy’, a nostalgic conservatism in Australia, or a continuing nation-building project in Malaysia – the cases show that distinctive social values and ideologies construct national citizenship curricula in Asian contexts even in this increasingly globalized era. This impressive collection of case studies of a diverse group of societies informs and enriches understanding of the complex relationship between citizenship education and the curriculum both regionally and globally.

Culture and Customs of Taiwan

Author: Gary Marvin Davison,Barbara E. Reed

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313302985

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 554

Discusses the traditions, culture, religion, media, literature, and arts of Taiwan.

The SSCI Syndrome in Higher Education

A Local or Global Phenomenon

Author: Chuing Prudence Chou

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9462094071

Category: Education

Page: 156

View: 596

As a result of the world class university rankings, many governments adopt public incentives and sanctions to push universities to excel. Above all, the better faculty research publication in SSCI and SCI journals, the more resources and social prestige universities will obtain. This timely book attempts to relate these dilemmas in Taiwan to many non-English speaking counterparts which also struggle with the worldwide SSCI syndrome. As Taiwan’s higher education system, similar to that of some other countries, has been recently devastated by the SSCI-based quantitative evaluations of academic performance in terms of its adverse impacts on the balances between teaching vs. research; qualitative vs. quantitative evaluations; globally oriented, English vs. locally oriented, non-English publications; and publications in academic journals vs. books, The SSCI Syndrome in Higher Education is a long overdue study that offers a systematic, comprehensive coverage of the above-mentioned SSCI syndrome on the dynamics of Taiwan’s academe. This book definitely helps fill an important gap in the literature on Taiwan’s higher education system. Tsung Chi Professor of Politics, Occidental College, USA Prudence Chou’s book addresses an academy on crisis caused by the ceaseless hype over university rankings. It further confirms that who comes out on top depends on who is doing the ranking. To save the heart and soul out of the Taiwanese academy, this book makes a cogent argument for culturally-responsive research in the social sciences and humanities. Gerard A. Postiglione Professor and Head, Division of Policy, Administration and Social Sciences Director, Wah Ching Center of Research on Education in China, The University of Hong Kong A spectre is haunting almost all universities in the world, including Taiwan — the spectre of “indexization.” Academics, particularly social scientists are panting from the pressure of globally spread neoliberal ideology and market-based principles. Collegiality on campus in the good old days has declined, and managerialism gained power instead. Competitive funding and university rankings are excessively emphasized, and research results are required to be internationalized, i.e., published in English. Although this book is a case study of so-called SSCI syndrome in Taiwan, the problems and challenges as well as prescription contained here are common to all academics, especially those in the non-English speaking countries positioned as “peripheral.” Yutaka Otsuka Professor of Hiroshima University, President of Japan Comparative Education Society The danger with SSCI syndrome is that it encourages social studies in nonwestern societies to dissociate themselves from local contexts, reflecting a particular view of what is claimed to be ‘universal’ that is informed only by the Western (especially English-speaking) world. It raises the question of what counts as ‘scholarship’ and defines what knowledge is and who may claim competence in it. This volume serves us well as a timely reminder of such a great danger. Rui Yang Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong

Taiwan's Democracy

Economic and Political Challenges

Author: Robert Ash,John W. Garver,Penelope Prime

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113667277X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 216

View: 811

Taiwan’s rapid industrialization during the 1960s and 1970s, combined with the democratic revolution that began with the lifting of martial law in 1987 were of deep historic importance. Over the next decade Taiwan’s "political miracle" matched its earlier "economic miracle" creating a vibrant liberal democracy complete with freedom of speech, association and assembly, rule of law, and competitive and fair multi-party elections. The continuation of these achievements and the new challenges that have surfaced are addressed in rich detail in the chapters of this volume by an international team of experts. One of the biggest such challenges is Mainland China’s economic success, which has added to the complexity of Taiwan’s economic and political policy options. A number of the contributors to this volume consider Taiwan’s response to China’s economic rise and show how Taiwanese companies have strategically taken advantage of the changing economic environment by moving up the value chain of production within Taiwan while also taking the opportunity to invest overseas. With chapters covering a wealth of topics including: Constitutional reform National identity Party politics Taiwan's development model Industrial policy Trade and investment Globalization Sustainable development Taiwan's Democracy will be of huge interest to students and scholars of Taiwan studies, Chinese politics and economics, international politics and economics, and development studies.