Statistics Done Wrong

The Woefully Complete Guide

Author: Alex Reinhart

Publisher: No Starch Press

ISBN: 1593276206

Category: Mathematics

Page: 152

View: 9773

Statistics Done Wrong describes how researchers often go wrong and teaches you the best practices for avoiding their mistakes.

Statistics Done Wrong

The Woefully Complete Guide

Author: Alex Reinhart

Publisher: No Starch Press

ISBN: 1593276737

Category: Mathematics

Page: 176

View: 7538

Scientific progress depends on good research, and good research needs good statistics. But statistical analysis is tricky to get right, even for the best and brightest of us. You'd be surprised how many scientists are doing it wrong. Statistics Done Wrong is a pithy, essential guide to statistical blunders in modern science that will show you how to keep your research blunder-free. You'll examine embarrassing errors and omissions in recent research, learn about the misconceptions and scientific politics that allow these mistakes to happen, and begin your quest to reform the way you and your peers do statistics. You'll find advice on: –Asking the right question, designing the right experiment, choosing the right statistical analysis, and sticking to the plan –How to think about p values, significance, insignificance, confidence intervals, and regression –Choosing the right sample size and avoiding false positives –Reporting your analysis and publishing your data and source code –Procedures to follow, precautions to take, and analytical software that can help Scientists: Read this concise, powerful guide to help you produce statistically sound research. Statisticians: Give this book to everyone you know. The first step toward statistics done right is Statistics Done Wrong.

How to Lie with Statistics

Author: Darrell Huff

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393070873

Category: Mathematics

Page: 144

View: 1095

Over Half a Million Copies Sold--an Honest-to-Goodness Bestseller Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to inform.

Common Errors in Statistics (and How to Avoid Them)

Author: Phillip I. Good,James W. Hardin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118360117

Category: Mathematics

Page: 352

View: 7636

Praise for Common Errors in Statistics (and How to Avoid Them) "A very engaging and valuable book for all who use statistics in any setting." —CHOICE "Addresses popular mistakes often made in data collection and provides an indispensable guide to accurate statistical analysis and reporting. The authors' emphasis on careful practice, combined with a focus on the development of solutions, reveals the true value of statistics when applied correctly in any area of research." —MAA Reviews Common Errors in Statistics (and How to Avoid Them), Fourth Edition provides a mathematically rigorous, yet readily accessible foundation in statistics for experienced readers as well as students learning to design and complete experiments, surveys, and clinical trials. Providing a consistent level of coherency throughout, the highly readable Fourth Edition focuses on debunking popular myths, analyzing common mistakes, and instructing readers on how to choose the appropriate statistical technique to address their specific task. The authors begin with an introduction to the main sources of error and provide techniques for avoiding them. Subsequent chapters outline key methods and practices for accurate analysis, reporting, and model building. The Fourth Edition features newly added topics, including: Baseline data Detecting fraud Linear regression versus linear behavior Case control studies Minimum reporting requirements Non-random samples The book concludes with a glossary that outlines key terms, and an extensive bibliography with several hundred citations directing readers to resources for further study. Presented in an easy-to-follow style, Common Errors in Statistics, Fourth Edition is an excellent book for students and professionals in industry, government, medicine, and the social sciences.

Flaws and Fallacies in Statistical Thinking

Author: Stephen K. Campbell

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486140512

Category: Mathematics

Page: 208

View: 5315

Nontechnical survey helps improve ability to judge statistical evidence and to make better-informed decisions. Discusses common pitfalls: unrealistic estimates, improper comparisons, premature conclusions, and faulty thinking about probability. 1974 edition.

What is a P-value Anyway?

34 Stories to Help You Actually Understand Statistics

Author: Andrew Vickers

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mathematics

Page: 212

View: 1082

What is a p-value Anyway? offers a fun introduction to the fundamental principles of statistics, presenting the essential concepts in thirty-four brief, enjoyable stories. Drawing on his experience as a medical researcher, Vickers blends insightful explanations and humor, with minimal math, to help readers understand and interpret the statistics they read every day. Describing data; Data distributions; Variation of study results: confidence intervals; Hypothesis testing; Regression and decision making; Some common statistical errors, and what they teach us For all readers interested in statistics.

Regression Basics

Author: Leo H. Kahane

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483317102

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 9413

Using a friendly, nontechnical approach, the Second Edition of Regression Basics introduces readers to the fundamentals of regression. Accessible to anyone with an introductory statistics background, this book builds from a simple two-variable model to a model of greater complexity. Author Leo H. Kahane weaves four engaging examples throughout the text to illustrate not only the techniques of regression but also how this empirical tool can be applied in creative ways to consider a broad array of topics. New to the Second Edition • Offers greater coverage of simple panel-data estimation: Because the availability of panel data has increased over the past decade, this new edition includes coverage of estimation with multiple cross-sections of data across time. • Provides an introductory discussion of omitted variables bias: As a problem that frequently arises, this issue is important for those new to regression analysis to understand. • Includes up-to-date advances: Chapter 7 is expanded to include recent developments in regression. • Uses a diverse selection of examples: Engaging examples illustrate the wide application of regression analysis from baseball salaries to presidential voting to British crime rates to U.S. abortion rates and more. • Includes more end-of-chapter problems: This edition offers new questions at the end of chapters that are based on the new examples woven through the book. • Illustrates examples using software programs: Appendix B now includes screenshots to further aid readers working with Microsoft Excel® and SPSS. Intended Audience This is an ideal core or supplemental text for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as Regression and Correlation, Sociological Research Methods, Quantitative Research Methods, and Statistical Methods in the fields of economics, public policy, political science, sociology, public affairs, urban planning, education, and geography.

Spurious Correlations

Author: Tyler Vigen

Publisher: Hachette Books

ISBN: 0316339458

Category: Humor

Page: 208

View: 2427

"Spurious Correlations ... is the most fun you'll ever have with graphs."--Bustle Military intelligence analyst and Harvard Law student Tyler Vigen illustrates the golden rule that "correlation does not equal causation" through hilarious graphs inspired by his viral website. Is there a correlation between Nic Cage films and swimming pool accidents? What about beef consumption and people getting struck by lightning? Absolutely not. But that hasn't stopped millions of people from going to tylervigen.com and asking, "Wait, what?" Vigen has designed software that scours enormous data sets to find unlikely statistical correlations. He began pulling the funniest ones for his website and has since gained millions of views, hundreds of thousands of likes, and tons of media coverage. Subversive and clever, Spurious Correlations is geek humor at its finest, nailing our obsession with data and conspiracy theory.

The Essential Guide to Effect Sizes

Statistical Power, Meta-Analysis, and the Interpretation of Research Results

Author: Paul D. Ellis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521142466

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 173

View: 5768

A jargon-free introduction for students and researchers looking to interpret the practical significance of their results.

Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data

Author: Charles Wheelan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393089827

Category: Mathematics

Page: 302

View: 9372

“Brilliant, funny . . . the best math teacher you never had.”—San Francisco Chronicle Once considered tedious, the field of statistics is rapidly evolving into a discipline Hal Varian, chief economist at Google, has actually called “sexy.” From batting averages and political polls to game shows and medical research, the real-world application of statistics continues to grow by leaps and bounds. How can we catch schools that cheat on standardized tests? How does Netflix know which movies you’ll like? What is causing the rising incidence of autism? As best-selling author Charles Wheelan shows us in Naked Statistics, the right data and a few well-chosen statistical tools can help us answer these questions and more. For those who slept through Stats 101, this book is a lifesaver. Wheelan strips away the arcane and technical details and focuses on the underlying intuition that drives statistical analysis. He clarifies key concepts such as inference, correlation, and regression analysis, reveals how biased or careless parties can manipulate or misrepresent data, and shows us how brilliant and creative researchers are exploiting the valuable data from natural experiments to tackle thorny questions. And in Wheelan’s trademark style, there’s not a dull page in sight. You’ll encounter clever Schlitz Beer marketers leveraging basic probability, an International Sausage Festival illuminating the tenets of the central limit theorem, and a head-scratching choice from the famous game show Let’s Make a Deal—and you’ll come away with insights each time. With the wit, accessibility, and sheer fun that turned Naked Economics into a bestseller, Wheelan defies the odds yet again by bringing another essential, formerly unglamorous discipline to life.

Willful Ignorance

The Mismeasure of Uncertainty

Author: Herbert I. Weisberg

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118593790

Category: Mathematics

Page: 452

View: 2847

An original account of willful ignorance and how this principle relates to modern probability and statistical methods Through a series of colorful stories about great thinkers and the problems they chose to solve, the author traces the historical evolution of probability and explains how statistical methods have helped to propel scientific research. However, the past success of statistics has depended on vast, deliberate simplifications amounting to willful ignorance, and this very success now threatens future advances in medicine, the social sciences, and other fields. Limitations of existing methods result in frequent reversals of scientific findings and recommendations, to the consternation of both scientists and the lay public. Willful Ignorance: The Mismeasure of Uncertainty exposes the fallacy of regarding probability as the full measure of our uncertainty. The book explains how statistical methodology, though enormously productive and influential over the past century, is approaching a crisis. The deep and troubling divide between qualitative and quantitative modes of research, and between research and practice, are reflections of this underlying problem. The author outlines a path toward the re-engineering of data analysis to help close these gaps and accelerate scientific discovery. Willful Ignorance: The Mismeasure of Uncertainty presents essential information and novel ideas that should be of interest to anyone concerned about the future of scientific research. The book is especially pertinent for professionals in statistics and related fields, including practicing and research clinicians, biomedical and social science researchers, business leaders, and policy-makers.

Teaching Statistics

A Bag of Tricks

Author: Andrew Gelman,Deborah Nolan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191088641

Category: Mathematics

Page: 384

View: 6077

Students in the sciences, economics, social sciences, and medicine take an introductory statistics course. And yet statistics can be notoriously difficult for instructors to teach and for students to learn. To help overcome these challenges, Gelman and Nolan have put together this fascinating and thought-provoking book. Based on years of teaching experience the book provides a wealth of demonstrations, activities, examples, and projects that involve active student participation. Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and has chapters such as 'First week of class'— with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then descriptive statistics, graphics, linear regression, data collection (sampling and experimentation), probability, inference, and statistical communication. Part II gives tips on what works and what doesn't, how to set up effective demonstrations, how to encourage students to participate in class and to work effectively in group projects. Course plans for introductory statistics, statistics for social scientists, and communication and graphics are provided. Part III presents material for more advanced courses on topics such as decision theory, Bayesian statistics, sampling, and data science.

Statistics in a Nutshell

Author: Sarah Boslaugh

Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."

ISBN: 1449316824

Category: Mathematics

Page: 569

View: 5541

A clear and concise introduction and reference for anyone new to the subject of statistics.

Cartoon Guide to Statistics

Author: Larry Gonick

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062731025

Category: Study Aids

Page: 240

View: 4041

If you have ever looked for P-values by shopping at P mart, tried to watch the Bernoulli Trails on "People's Court," or think that the standard deviation is a criminal offense in six states, then you need The Cartoon Guide to Statistics to put you on the road to statistical literacy. The Cartoon Guide to Statistics covers all the central ideas of modern statistics: the summary and display of data, probability in gambling and medicine, random variables, Bernoulli Trails, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence interval estimation, and much more—all explained in simple, clear, and yes, funny illustrations. Never again will you order the Poisson Distribution in a French restaurant!

The Seven Pillars of Statistical Wisdom

Author: Stephen M. Stigler

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674970217

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 7480

What gives statistics its unity as a science? Stephen Stigler sets forth the seven foundational ideas of statistics—a scientific discipline related to but distinct from mathematics and computer science and one which often seems counterintuitive. His original account will fascinate the interested layperson and engage the professional statistician.

Math on Trial

How Numbers Get Used and Abused in the Courtroom

Author: Leila Schneps,Coralie Colmez

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465037941

Category: Mathematics

Page: 272

View: 3737

In the wrong hands, math can be deadly. Even the simplest numbers can become powerful forces when manipulated by journalists, politicians or other public figures, but in the case of the law your liberty—and your life—can depend on the right calculation. Math on Trial tells the story of ten trials in which mathematical arguments were used—and disastrously misused—as evidence. Despite years of math classes, most people (and most jurors) fail to detect even simple mathematical sophistry, resulting in such horrors as a medical expert’s faulty calculation of probabilities providing the key evidence for a British mother’s conviction for the murder of her two babies. The conviction was later overturned, but three years in prison took its toll—Sally Clark died of acute alcohol intoxication in March of 2007. Mathematicians Leila Schneps and Coralie Colmez use a wide range of examples, from a mid-19th-century dispute over wills that became a signal case in the forensic use of mathematics, to the conviction and subsequent exoneration of Amanda Knox, to show how the improper application of mathematical concepts can mean the difference between walking free and life in prison. The cases discussed include: -The Case of Amanda Knox (How a judge’s denial of a second DNA test may have destroyed a chance to reveal the truth about Meredith Kercher’s murder) -The Case of Joe Sneed (How a fabricated probability framed a son for his parents’ grisly killing) -The Case of Sally Clark (How multiplying non-independent probabilities landed an innocent mother in jail for the murder of her children) -The Case of Janet Collins (How unjustified estimates combined with a miscalculated probability convicted an innocent couple of violent robbery) A colorful narrative of mathematical abuse featuring such characters as Charles Ponzi, Alfred Dreyfus, Hetty Green, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Math on Trial shows that legal expertise isn’t everything when it comes to proving a man innocent.

Dicing with Death

Chance, Risk and Health

Author: Stephen Senn

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139438999

Category: Mathematics

Page: N.A

View: 5910

If you think that statistics has nothing to say about what you do or how you could do it better, then you are either wrong or in need of a more interesting job. Stephen Senn explains here how statistics determines many decisions about medical care, from allocating resources for health, to determining which drugs to license, to cause-and-effect in relation to disease. He tackles big themes: clinical trials and the development of medicines, life tables, vaccines and their risks or lack of them, smoking and lung cancer and even the power of prayer. He entertains with puzzles and paradoxes and covers the lives of famous statistical pioneers. By the end of the book the reader will see how reasoning with probability is essential to making rational decisions in medicine, and how and when it can guide us when faced with choices that impact on our health and even life.

Bayes' Rule

A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Analysis

Author: James V. Stone

Publisher: Sebtel Press

ISBN: 0956372848

Category: Bayesian statistical decision theory

Page: 170

View: 6149

In this richly illustrated book, a range of accessible examples are used to show how Bayes' rule is actually a natural consequence of commonsense reasoning. The tutorial style of writing, combined with a comprehensive glossary, makes this an ideal primer for the novice who wishes to become familiar with the basic principles of Bayesian analysis.

100 Statistical Tests

Author: Gopal K Kanji

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412923767

Category: Mathematics

Page: 242

View: 3290

This expanded and updated Third Edition of Gopal K. Kanji’s best-selling resource on statistical tests covers all the most commonly used tests with information on how to calculate and interpret results with simple datasets. Each entry begins with a short summary statement about the test’s purpose, and contains details of the test objective, the limitations (or assumptions) involved, a brief outline of the method, a worked example, and the numerical calculation. 100 Statistical Tests, Third Edition is the one indispensable guide for users of statistical materials and consumers of statistical information at all levels and across all disciplines.