Sports and the Racial Divide

African American and Latino Experience in an Era of Change

Author: Michael E. Lomax

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617030465

Category: African American athletes

Page: 220

View: 6880

With essays by Ron Briley, Michael Ezra, Sarah K. Fields, Billy Hawkins, Jorge Iber, Kurt Kemper, Michael E. Lomax, Samuel O. Regalado, Richard Santillan, and Maureen Smith This anthology explores the intersection of race, ethnicity, and sports and analyzes the forces that shaped the African American and Latino sports experience in post-World War II America. Contributors reveal that sports often reinforced dominant ideas about race and racial supremacy but that at other times sports became a platform for addressing racial and social injustices. The African American sports experience represented the continuation of the ideas of Black Nationalism--racial solidarity, black empowerment, and a determination to fight against white racism. Three of the essayists discuss the protest at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. In football, baseball, basketball, boxing, and track and field, African American athletes moved toward a position of group strength, establishing their own values and simultaneously rejecting the cultural norms of whites. Among Latinos, athletic achievement inspired community celebrations and became a way to express pride in ethnic and religious heritages as well as a diversion from the work week. Sports was a means by which leadership and survival tactics were developed and used in the political arena and in the fight for justice.Michael E. Lomax is associate professor of health and sport studies at the University of Iowa and the author of Black Baseball Entrepreneurs, 1860-1901: Operating by Any Means Necessary.Kenneth L. Shropshire is David W. Hauck Professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and director of the school's Sports Business initiative.

Darwin's Athletes

How Sport Has Damaged Black America and Preserved the Myth of Race

Author: John Hoberman

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547348541

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 2348

A “provocative, disturbing, important” look at how society’s obsession with athletic achievement undermines African Americans (The New York Times). Very few pastimes in America cross racial, regional, cultural, and economic boundaries the way sports do. From the near-religious respect for Sunday Night Football to obsessions with stars like Tiger Woods, Serena Williams, and Michael Jordan, sports are as much a part of our national DNA as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. But hidden within this reverence—shared by the media, corporate America, even the athletes themselves—is a dark narrative of division, social pathology, and racism. In Darwin’s Athletes, John Hoberman takes a controversial look at the profound and disturbing effect that the worship of sports, and specifically of black players, has on national race relations. From exposing the perpetuation of stereotypes of African American violence and criminality to examining the effect that athletic dominance has on perceptions of intelligence to delving into misconceptions of racial biology, Hoberman tackles difficult questions about the sometimes subtle ways that bigotry can be reinforced, and the nature of discrimination. An important discussion on sports, cultural attitudes, and dangerous prejudices, Darwin’s Athletes is a “provocative book” that serves as required reading in the ongoing debate of America’s racial divide (Publishers Weekly).

White Sports/Black Sports: Racial Disparities in Athletic Programs

Racial Disparities in Athletic Programs

Author: Lori Latrice Martin Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440800545

Category: Social Science

Page: 209

View: 8229

The racial makeup of sports in the United States serves as a classic example of racism in the 21st century. This book examines the racial disparities in sports and the continuing significance of race in 21st-century America, debunking the myth of a "postracial society." • Examines how race and sports are powerful social constructions • Presents examples of how sports can serve as both a liberating and an oppressive force • Explains how sports influence and are influenced by society and the ways in which institutional barriers and personal practices perpetuate racism in sports and in the society at large • Documents how historic racial stereotypes, such as the "brute" and "sapphire" caricatures, are alive and well in the world of sports

Soul Thieves

The Appropriation and Misrepresentation of African American Popular Culture

Author: T. Brown,B. Kopano

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137071397

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 5810

Considers the misappropriation of African American popular culture through various genres, largely Hip Hop, to argue that while such cultural creations have the potential to be healing agents, they are still exploited -often with the complicity of African Americans- for commercial purposes and to maintain white ruling class hegemony.

Routledge Companion to Sports History

Author: S. W. Pope,John Nauright

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135978123

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 672

View: 5885

The field of sports history is no longer a fledgling area of study. There is a great vitality in the field and it has matured dramatically over the past decade. Reflecting changes to traditional approaches, sport historians need now to engage with contemporary debates about history, to be encouraged to position themselves and their methodologies in relation to current epistemological issues, and to promote the importance of reflecting on the literary or poetic dimensions of producing history. These contemporary developments, along with a wealth of international research from a range of theoretical perspectives, provide the backdrop to the new Routledge Companion to Sports History. This book provides a comprehensive guide to the international field of sports history as it has developed as an academic area of study. Readers are guided through the development of the field across a range of thematic and geographical contexts and are introduced to the latest cutting edge approaches within the field. Including contributions from many of the world’s leading sports historians, the Routledge Companion to Sports History is the most important single volume for researchers and students in, and entering, the sports history field. It is an essential guide to contemporary research themes, to new ways of doing sports history, and to the theoretical and methodological foundations of this most fascinating of subjects.

The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central

High School Basketball at the '68 Racial Divide

Author: Steve Marantz

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803234341

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 247

View: 5006

Nicknamed the "Rhythm Boys," provides a history of Omaha Central High School's all-black starting lineup in the spring of 1968, detailing the role of star center Dwaine Dillard, segregationist George Wallace, and the racial tensions following Wallace's visit in determining the Nebraska state high school basketball tournament champion in that tumultuous year.

Latinos in the End Zone

Conversations on the Brown Color Line in the NFL

Author: F. Aldama,C. González

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137403098

Category: Social Science

Page: 122

View: 2262

Frederick Luis Aldama and Christopher González offer a thought-provoking conversation on the history of Latinos in the pro football leagues. As they weave their way through significant points where culture, politics, and history congeal, Aldama and González thread together an alpha-to-omega, all-encompassing story of Latinos in the NFL.

Shut Out

A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston

Author: Howard Bryant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135297835

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 6096

Shut Out is the compelling story of Boston's racial divide viewed through the lens of one of the city's greatest institutions - its baseball team, and told from the perspective of Boston native and noted sports writer Howard Bryant. This well written and poignant work contains striking interviews in which blacks who played for the Red Sox speak for the first time about their experiences in Boston, as well as groundbreaking chapter that details Jackie Robinson's ill-fated tryout with the Boston Red Sox and the humiliation that followed.

Uninvited Neighbors

African Americans in Silicon Valley, 1769–1990

Author: Herbert G. Ruffin

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 080614582X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6034

In the late 1960s, African American protests and Black Power demonstrations in California’s Santa Clara County—including what’s now called Silicon Valley—took many observers by surprise. After all, as far back as the 1890s, the California constitution had legally abolished most forms of racial discrimination, and subsequent legal reform had surely taken care of the rest. White Americans might even have wondered where the black activists in the late sixties were coming from—because, beginning with the writings of Fredrick Jackson Turner, the most influential histories of the American West simply left out African Americans or, later, portrayed them as a passive and insignificant presence. Uninvited Neighbors puts black people back into the picture and dispels cherished myths about California’s racial history. Reaching from the Spanish era to the valley’s emergence as a center of the high-tech industry, this is the first comprehensive history of the African American experience in the Santa Clara Valley. Author Herbert G. Ruffin II’s study presents the black experience in a new way, with a focus on how, despite their smaller numbers and obscure presence, African Americans in the South Bay forged communities that had a regional and national impact disproportionate to their population. As the region industrialized and spawned suburbs during and after World War II, its black citizens built institutions such as churches, social clubs, and civil rights organizations and challenged socioeconomic restrictions. Ruffin explores the quest of the area’s black people for the postwar American Dream. The book also addresses the scattering of the black community during the region’s late yet rapid urban growth after 1950, which led to the creation of several distinct black suburban communities clustered in metropolitan San Jose. Ruffin treats people of color as agents of their own development and survival in a region that was always multiracial and where slavery and Jim Crow did not predominate, but where the white embrace of racial justice and equality was often insincere. The result offers a new view of the intersection of African American history and the history of the American West.

The New Jim Crow

Masseninhaftierung und Rassismus in den USA

Author: Michelle Alexander

Publisher: Antje Kunstmann

ISBN: 3956141598

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9479

Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.

Wounds That Will Not Heal

Affirmative Action and Our Continuing Racial Divide

Author: Russell Nieli

Publisher: Encounter Books

ISBN: 1594035830

Category: Political Science

Page: 456

View: 8667

Racial preference policies first came on the national scene as a response to black poverty and alienation in America as dramatically revealed in the destructive urban riots of the late 1960s. From the start, however, preference policies were controversial and were greeted by many, including many who had fought the good fight against segregation and Jim Crow to further a color-blind justice, with a sense of outrage and deep betrayal. In the more than forty years that preference policies have been with us little has changed in terms of public opinion, as polls indicate that a majority of Americans continue to oppose such policies, often with great intensity. In Wounds That Will Not Heal political theorist Russell K. Nieli surveys some of the more important social science research on racial preference policies over the past two decades, much of which, he shows, undermines the central claims of preference policy supporters. The mere fact that preference policies have to be referred to through an elaborate system of euphemisms and code words— "affirmative action," "diversity," "goals and timetables," "race sensitive admissions"— tells us something, Nieli argues, about their widespread unpopularity, their tendency to reinforce negative stereotypes about their intended beneficiaries, and their incompatibility with core principles of American justice. Nieli concludes with an impassioned plea to refocus our public attention on the "truly disadvantaged" African American population in our nation's urban centers—the people for whom affirmative action policies were initially instituted but whose interests, Nieli charges, were soon forgotten as the fruits of the policies were hijacked by members of the black and Hispanic middle class. Few will be able to read this book without at least questioning the wisdom of our current race-based preference regime, which Nieli analyses with a penetrating gaze and an eye for cant that will leave few unmoved.

Sportsex

Author: Toby Miller

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1592138209

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 192

View: 8180

How people perform their sexual identities as athletes and spectators.

Fair and Foul

Beyond the Myths and Paradoxes of Sport

Author: D. Stanley Eitzen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0742564703

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 300

View: 1385

Stan Eitzen explores America's love of sport just as he reveals sport's darker side-the influence of big business, corruption, price gouging, political maneuvering, parental meddling and media grandstanding.

Beer, Babes, and Balls

Masculinity and Sports Talk Radio

Author: David Nylund

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791472385

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 190

View: 556

Looks at contemporary sports talk radio and its relations to both traditional and newer forms of masculinity.

Black Planet

Facing Race During an NBA Season

Author: David Shields

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN: 0307767108

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 4456

The National Basketball Association is a place where, without ever acknowledging it, white fans and black players enact and quietly explode virtually every racial issue and tension in the culture at large. In Black Planet, David Shields explores how, in a predominantly black sport, white fans--including especially himself--think about and talk about black heroes, black scapegoats, black bodies. During the 1994-95 NBA season, Shields went to the Seattle SuperSonics' home games; watched their away games on TV; listened to interviews and call-in shows; talked, or tried to talk, to players, coaches, and agents; attended charity events; corresponded with members of the Sonics newsgroup on the Web. He kept a journal and over the next few years transformed that journal into this book, which is focused sharply on white spectators' relationship to black athletes, in particular Shields' own identification with Gary Payton, the team's language-besotted point-guard. Through the apparently simple vehicle of a daily diary running from November 5, 1994 to May 5, 1995, and ranging from a dispute between two fans over the sale of a ticket to the national media frenzy surrounding Charles Barkley's jest "That's why I hate white people," David Shields confronts the nature of racism (including his own)--the otherness in ourselves that we project onto strangers. He takes us via sports passion deep into the American racial divide. From the Hardcover edition.

Diversity and Social Justice in College Sports

Sport Management and the Student Athlete

Author: Dana D. Brooks,Ronald C. Althouse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781885693778

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 431

View: 444

Each of the well-researched chapters in this comprehensive volume makes a singular contribution to understanding the complexities of diversity and social justice in college sports. Chapters are grouped into sections that address major components: Historical Analysis; Social Justice and Cultural Concerns; African American Coaching and Other Leadership Opportunities; Media, Media Images, and Stereotyping; Intersection of Race, Sport, and Law; Sport Administration/Management: Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender; Looking Toward the Future. This volume makes a valuable contribution to the literature on American sports.