Special Racing Cars and Hot Rods of the World

A Book Giving Construction Data, Mechanical and Design Information on Famous "specials" of All Countries

Author: Günther Molter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile racing

Page: 143

View: 440

Catalog of Copyright Entries. Third Series

1951

Author:

Publisher: Copyright Office, Library of Congress

ISBN:

Category: Copyright

Page: 1543

View: 655

Includes Part 1A: Books and Part 1B: Pamphlets, Serials and Contributions to Periodicals

Men to Boys

The Making of Modern Immaturity

Author: Gary Cross

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 720

Adam Sandler movies, HBO's Entourage, and such magazines as Maxim and FHM all trade in and appeal to one character the modern boy-man. Addicted to video games, comic books, extreme sports, and dressing down, the boy-man would rather devote an afternoon to Grand Theft Auto than plan his next career move. He would rather prolong the hedonistic pleasures of youth than embrace the self-sacrificing demands of adulthood. When did maturity become the ultimate taboo? Men have gone from idolizing Cary Grant to aping Hugh Grant, shunning marriage and responsibility well into their twenties and thirties. Gary Cross, renowned cultural historian, identifies the boy-man and his habits, examining the attitudes and practices of three generations to make sense of this gradual but profound shift in American masculinity. Cross matches the rise of the American boy-man to trends in twentieth-century advertising, popular culture, and consumerism, and he locates the roots of our present crisis in the vague call for a new model of leadership that, ultimately, failed to offer a better concept of maturity. Cross does not blame the young or glorify the past. He finds that men of the "Greatest Generation" might have embraced their role as providers but were confused by the contradictions and expectations of modern fatherhood. Their uncertainty gave birth to the Beats and men who indulged in childhood hobbies and boyish sports. Rather than fashion a new manhood, baby-boomers held onto their youth and, when that was gone, embraced Viagra. Without mature role models to emulate or rebel against, Generation X turned to cynicism and sensual intensity, and the media fed on this longing, transforming a life stage into a highly desirable lifestyle. Arguing that contemporary American culture undermines both conservative ideals of male maturity and the liberal values of community and responsibility, Cross concludes with a proposal for a modern marriage of personal desire and ethical adulthood.

American Auto Racing

The Milestones and Personalities of a Century of Speed

Author: J.A. Martin

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 231

View: 752

As soon as there were automobiles, there was racing. The first recorded race, an over road event from Paris to Rouen, France, was organized by the French newspaper Le Petit Journal in 1894. Seeing an opportunity for a similar event, Hermann H. Kohlsaat--publisher of the Chicago Times-Herald--sponsored what was hailed as the "Race of the Century," a 54-mile race from Chicago's Jackson Park to Evanston, Illinois, and back. Frank Duryea won in a time of 10 hours and 23 minutes, of which 7 hours and 53 minutes were actually spent on the road. Race cars and competition have progressed continuously since that time, and today's 200 mph races bear little resemblance to the event Duryea won. This work traces American auto racing through the 20th century, covering its significant milestones, developments and personalities. Subjects included are: Bill Elliott, dirt track racing, board track racing, Henry Ford, Grand Prix races, Dale Earnhardt, the Vanderbilt Cup, Bill France, Gordon Bennett, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the Mercer, the Stutz, Duesenberg, Frank Lockhart, drag racing, the Trans Am, Paul Newman, vintage racing, land speed records, Al Unser, Wilbur Shaw, the Corvette, the Cobra, Richard Petty, NASCAR, Can Am, Mickey Thompson, Roger Penske, Mario Andretti, Jeff Gordon, and Formula One. Through interviews with participants and track records, this text shows where, when and how racing changed. It describes the growth of each different form of auto racing as well as the people and technologies that made it ever faster.

AMC Muscle Cars : Muscle Car Color History

Author: Larry G. Mitchell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page:

View: 613

Anybody who wanted to go toe to toe with the Big Three in the 1960s had to produce credible muscle cars. American Motors Corporation did exactly that with the SC Rambler and the incredibly fast AMX. Some argue, however, that AMC's insistence on pouring its relatively limited resources into the "muscle wars" ultimately led to its demise. Illustrated throughout with modern photography of restored and factory-original cars, archival images, AMC concept drawings, period advertisements, and cutaway illustrations, this color history primarily focuses on the conception, development, production, and performance of the AMX, as well as the Javelin upon which it was based. Special models like the Mark Donohue Signature Edition Javelin, along with the less-than-well-received Marlin, Rebel, SST, Hornet 360, Gremlin X, and others are also included.

Middletown Pacemakers

The Story of an Ohio Hot Rod Club

Author: Ron Roberson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 168

View: 358

Hot Rodding began in Southern California in the 1930s and had spread throughout the United States by the mid 1950s, spawning the sport of drag racing and the advent of the Detroit "muscle cars" of the '60s and '70s. Hot Rod Magazine and the National Hot Rod Association promoted the formation of responsible car clubs to combat the delinquent reputation of hot rodders, earned through illegal street races and Hollywood's portrayal in "B" movies. And thus were born the Middletown Pacemakers in 1951. The Pacemakers brought southern Ohio its first reliability runs (1952), custom auto shows (1954), and drag racing competitions-setting national records (1958, '63, '64) and winning national championships (1963, '64, '65). When the hot rodders were not busy upgrading their drive train for more horsepower or "chopping" and "channeling" for improved performance, they could often be seen on the streets of Middletown feeding expired parking meters or rescuing motorists whose cars had broken down or run out of gas. By 1966, as was the fate of so many hot rod clubs, the mass production of Detroit muscle cars ushered the Pacemakers to fold.

Offenhauser

The Legendary Racing Engine and the Men Who Built It

Author: Gordon Eliot White

Publisher: MotorBooks International

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 200

View: 810

From the 1920s to through 1980, the Offenhauser and its descendants filled the grids and won race after race across the U.S. In the 1950s, entire Indy grids were made up exclusively of Offy-powered racers. Original hardcover received much acclaim, winner of the 1996 Thomas McKean Memorial award.

The Sports Book

Author: DK Publishing

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 448

View: 553

The Sports Book features a large and diverse range of over 200 sports, from basketball to bobsledding, karate to korfball, and synchronized swimming to ski-jumping. This up-to-date and authoritative guide presents information sourced from leading experts and sports governing bodies around the world to give you the most comprehensive book on sports to ever hit the market.