Sovereignty, Property and Empire, 1500-2000

Author: Andrew Fitzmaurice

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107076498

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 8809

Adopting a global approach, Fitzmaurice analyses the laws that shaped modern European empires from medieval times to the twentieth century.

Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World

The Legal Foundations of Empire, 1576-1640

Author: Ken MacMillan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521870097

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 6219

How did English notions of sovereignty, empire and law impact their methods of settlement in the Americas?

Justice for Earthlings

Essays in Political Philosophy

Author: David Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107028795

Category: Philosophy

Page: 254

View: 6288

David Miller explores what justice means for real people and challenges philosophical theories that ignore the facts of human life.

European Conquest and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Moral Backwardness of International Society

Author: Paul Keal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521531795

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 1958

An examination of the rights and representation of indigenous peoples in the expansion of international society.

Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain

Author: Mark Bevir

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316738949

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 5430

Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain explores the rise and nature of historicist thinking about such varied topics as life, race, character, literature, language, economics, empire, and law. The contributors show that the Victorians typically understood life and society as developing historically in a way that made history central to their intellectual inquiries and their public culture. Although their historicist ideas drew on some Enlightenment themes, they drew at least as much on organic ideas and metaphors in ways that lent them a developmental character. This developmental historicism flourished alongside evolutionary motifs and romantic ideas of the self. The human sciences were approached through narratives, and often narratives of reason and progress. Life, individuals, society, government, and literature all unfolded gradually in accord with underlying principles, such as those of rationality, nationhood, and liberty. This book will appeal to those interested in Victorian Britain, historiography, and intellectual history.

The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism

Author: Edward Cavanagh,Lorenzo Veracini

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134828470

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 588

The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism examines the global history of settler colonialism as a distinct mode of domination from ancient times to the present day. It explores the ways in which new polities were established in freshly discovered ‘New Worlds’, and covers the history of many countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Japan, South Africa, Liberia, Algeria, Canada, and the USA. Chronologically as well as geographically wide-reaching, this volume focuses on an extensive array of topics and regions ranging from settler colonialism in the Neo-Assyrian and Roman empires, to relationships between indigenes and newcomers in New Spain and the early Mexican republic, to the settler-dominated polities of Africa during the twentieth century. Its twenty-nine inter-disciplinary chapters focus on single colonies or on regional developments that straddle the borders of present-day states, on successful settlements that would go on to become powerful settler nations, on failed settler colonies, and on the historiographies of these experiences. Taking a fundamentally international approach to the topic, this book analyses the varied experiences of settler colonialism in countries around the world. With a synthesizing yet original introduction, this is a landmark contribution to the emerging field of settler colonial studies and will be a valuable resource for anyone interested in the global history of imperialism and colonialism.

Nature, Action and the Future

Political Thought and the Environment

Author: Katrina Forrester,Sophie Smith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108196233

Category: Political Science

Page: 254

View: 5225

Climate change is one of the great challenges of modern politics. In this volume, leading political theorists and historians investigate how the history of political ideas can help us make sense of it. The contributors add a historical perspective to contemporary debates in political theory. They also show that the history of political thought offers new directions for thinking about the environment today. By situating the relationship between humans and nature within a wider history of ideas, the essays provide alternative ways of thinking about the most intractable problems of environmental politics - the status of science in modern democracies, problems of collective action, and the challenges of fatalism. This volume will create new avenues of research for scholars and students in the history of political thought. It is essential reading for undergraduate students interested in environmental challenges: both those in politics seeking a historical perspective, and those in history who want to link their studies to the present.

Rage for Order

Author: Lauren Benton,Lisa Ford

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674972805

Category: Law

Page: 264

View: 3299

Lauren Benton and Lisa Ford find the origins of international law in empires, especially in the British Empire’s sprawling efforts to refashion the imperial constitution and reorder the world. These attempts touched on all the issues of the early nineteenth century, from slavery to revolution, and changed the way we think about the empire’s legacy.

Imperial Sceptics

British Critics of Empire, 1850–1920

Author: Gregory Claeys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139492551

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 2838

Imperial Sceptics provides a highly original analysis of the emergence of opposition to the British Empire from 1850–1920. Departing from existing accounts, which have focused upon the Boer War and the writings of John Hobson, Gregory Claeys proposes a new chronology for the contours of resistance to imperial expansion. Claeys locates the impetus for such opposition in the late 1850s with the British followers of Auguste Comte. Tracing critical strands of anti-imperial thought through to the First World War, Claeys then scrutinises the full spectrum of socialist writings from the early 1880s onwards, revealing a fundamental division over whether a new conception of 'socialist imperialism' could appeal to the electorate and satisfy economic demands. Based upon extensive archival research, and utilising rare printed sources, Imperial Sceptics will prove a major contribution to our understanding of nineteenth-century political thought, shedding new light on theories of nationalism, patriotism, the state and religion.

The Politics of the Governed

Reflections on Popular Politics in Most of the World

Author: Partha Chatterjee

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023150389X

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 3434

Often dismissed as the rumblings of "the street," popular politics is where political modernity is being formed today, according to Partha Chatterjee. The rise of mass politics all over the world in the twentieth century led to the development of new techniques of governing population groups. On the one hand, the idea of popular sovereignty has gained wide acceptance. On the other hand, the proliferation of security and welfare technologies has created modern governmental bodies that administer populations, but do not provide citizens with an arena for democratic deliberation. Under these conditions, democracy is no longer government of, by, and for the people. Rather, it has become a world of power whose startling dimensions and unwritten rules of engagement Chatterjee provocatively lays bare. This book argues that the rise of ethnic or identity politics—particularly in the postcolonial world—is a consequence of new techniques of governmental administration. Using contemporary examples from India, the book examines the different forms taken by the politics of the governed. Many of these operate outside of the traditionally defined arena of civil society and the formal legal institutions of the state. This book considers the global conditions within which such local forms of popular politics have appeared and shows us how both community and global society have been transformed. Chatterjee's analysis explores the strategic as well as the ethical dimensions of the new democratic politics of rights, claims, and entitlements of population groups and permits a new understanding of the dynamics of world politics both before and after the events of September 11, 2001. The Politics of the Governed consists of three essays, originally given as the Leonard Hastings Schoff Lectures at Columbia University in November 2001, and four additional essays that complement and extend the analyses presented there. By combining these essays between the covers of a single volume, Chatterjee has given us a major and urgent work that provides a full perspective on the possibilities and limits of democracy in the postcolonial world.

Property and Dispossession

Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America

Author: Allan Greer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107160642

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 6155

Offers a new reading of the history of the colonization of North America and the dispossession of its indigenous peoples.

Ancient Wisdom in the Age of the New Science

Histories of Philosophy in England, c. 1640–1700

Author: Dmitri Levitin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316395545

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4710

Seventeenth-century England has long been heralded as the birthplace of a so-called 'new' philosophy. Yet what contemporaries might have understood by 'old' philosophy has been little appreciated. In this book Dmitri Levitin examines English attitudes to ancient philosophy in unprecedented depth, demonstrating the centrality of engagement with the history of philosophy to almost all educated persons, whether scholars, clerics, or philosophers themselves, and aligning English intellectual culture closely to that of continental Europe. Drawing on a vast array of sources, Levitin challenges the assumption that interest in ancient ideas was limited to out-of-date 'ancients' or was in some sense 'pre-enlightened'; indeed, much of the intellectual justification for the new philosophy came from re-writing its history. At the same time, the deep investment of English scholars in pioneering forms of late humanist erudition led them to develop some of the most innovative narratives of ancient philosophy in early modern Europe.

English as a Global Language

Author: David Crystal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107611806

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 212

View: 3306

David Crystal's classic English as a Global Language considers the history, present status and future of the English language, focusing on its role as the leading international language. English has been deemed the most 'successful' language ever, with 1500 million speakers internationally, presenting a difficult task to those who wish to investigate it in its entirety. However, Crystal explores the subject in a measured but engaging way, always backing up observations with facts and figures. Written in a detailed and fascinating manner, this is a book written by an expert both for specialists in the subject and for general readers interested in the English language.

The English and Their History

Author: Robert Tombs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874775

Category: History

Page: 1040

View: 8079

A New York Times 2016 Notable Book Robert Tombs’s momentous The English and Their History is both a startlingly fresh and a uniquely inclusive account of the people who have a claim to be the oldest nation in the world. The English first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. They have lasted as a recognizable entity ever since, and their defining national institutions can be traced back to the earliest years of their history. The English have come a long way from those first precarious days of invasion and conquest, with many spectacular changes of fortune. Their political, economic and cultural contacts have left traces for good and ill across the world. This book describes their history and its meanings from their beginnings in the monasteries of Northumbria and the wetlands of Wessex to the cosmopolitan energy of today’s England. Robert Tombs draws out important threads running through the story, including participatory government, language, law, religion, the land and the sea, and ever-changing relations with other peoples. Not the least of these connections are the ways the English have understood their own history, have argued about it, forgotten it and yet been shaped by it. These diverse and sometimes conflicting understandings are an inherent part of their identity. Rather to their surprise, as ties within the United Kingdom loosen, the English are suddenly embarking on a new chapter. The English and Their History, the first single-volume work on this scale for more than half a century, and which incorporates a wealth of recent scholarship, presents a challenging modern account of this immense and continuing story, bringing out the strength and resilience of English government, the deep patterns of division and also the persistent capacity to come together in the face of danger.

Sovereignty, International Law, and the French Revolution

Author: Edward James Kolla

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316843823

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5928

The advent of the principle of popular sovereignty during the French Revolution inspired an unintended but momentous change in international law. Edward James Kolla explains that between 1789 and 1799, the idea that peoples ought to determine their fates in international affairs, just as they were taking power domestically in France, inspired a series of new and interconnected claims to territory. Drawing on case studies from Avignon, Belgium, the Rhineland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Italy, Kolla traces how French revolutionary diplomats and leaders gradually applied principles derived from new domestic political philosophy and law to the international stage. Instead of obtaining land via dynastic inheritance or conquest in war, the will of the people would now determine the title and status of territory. However, the principle of popular sovereignty also opened up new justifications for aggressive conquest, and this history foreshadowed some of the most controversial questions in international relations today.

Lords of All the World

Ideologies of Empire in Spain, Britain and France C.1500-c.1800

Author: Anthony Pagden

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300074499

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 4836

This book, the first to compare theories of empire as they emerged in, and helped to define, the great colonial powers-Spain, Britain, and France-describes the different ways and arguments these countries used to legitimate the seizure and subjugation of aboriginal lands and peoples."Learned, wide-ranging and important. . . . Pagdens willingness to examine the three empires in tandem is as rewarding as it is innovative."-Linda Colley, London Review of Books"An impressive book, erudite and lively. . . .The book succeeds as an exercise in drawing together the interpretive treatises of three empires over three centuries and showing, often subtly but at times explicitly, their similarity."-William D. Phillips, Jr., American Historical Review"This volume . . . provides an excellent commentary on the imperial ideologies of three major European powers during the early modern era. . . . This is a book to which scholars will return time and again. I certainly found it intellectually stimulating."-Chandra R. de Silva, Sixteenth Century JournalAnthony Pagden is Harry C. Black professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. He is also the author of European Encounters with the New World: From Renaissance to Romanticism and Spanish Imperialism and the Political Imagination, both published by Yale University Press.

Sovereignty and Territorial Temptation

Author: Christopher Rossi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107183537

Category: Law

Page: 354

View: 5609

This powerful reworking of the liberal tradition of international law uses Grotius as the vehicle for understanding coming challenges to the global commons. Fundamental problems of scarcity, sovereignty, anachronistic thinking, and territorial temptation are interwoven in historical and contemporary contexts to illuminate the tendency among states to share resources, but only when necessary.

Once Within Borders

Author: Charles S. Maier

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674973917

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 6297

At a time when the technologies of globalization are eroding barriers to communication, transportation, and trade, Charles Maier explores the fitful evolution of territories—politically bounded regions whose borders define the jurisdiction of laws and the movement of peoples—as a worldwide practice of human societies.

The Emergence of Modern Aesthetic Theory

Religion and Morality in Enlightenment Germany and Scotland

Author: Simon Grote

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107110920

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 6756

This new study of eighteenth-century aesthetic theory situates it in theological contexts that are crucial to explaining why it arose.

Ideology and Empire in Eighteenth-Century India

The British in Bengal

Author: Robert Travers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139464167

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7863

Robert Travers' analysis of British conquests in late eighteenth-century India shows how new ideas were formulated about the construction of empire. After the British East India Company conquered the vast province of Bengal, Britons confronted the apparent anomaly of a European trading company acting as an Indian ruler. Responding to a prolonged crisis of imperial legitimacy, British officials in Bengal tried to build their authority on the basis of an 'ancient constitution', supposedly discovered among the remnants of the declining Mughal Empire. In the search for an indigenous constitution, British political concepts were redeployed and redefined on the Indian frontier of empire, while stereotypes about 'oriental despotism' were challenged by the encounter with sophisticated Indian state forms. This highly original book uncovers a forgotten style of imperial state-building based on constitutional restoration, and in the process opens up new points of connection between British, imperial and South Asian history.